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Health of Those Who Have Served Report 2016

November 10, 2016

America's Health Rankings, in partnership with MOAA, released the Health of Those Who Have Served Report to develop a holistic study of the heath of those who have served in the U.S. military compared with the health of civilians in the same age and demographic groups. The report focuses on the health of those who have ever served on active duty in the United States Armed Forces, either in regular military or in a National Guard or military reserve unit. Within the sample, the age distribution of those who have served and those who have not was adjusted to reflect the U.S. population and provide comparisons for the same age and demographic groups of both populations. The Health of Those Who Have Served Report establishes a national baseline portrait of the health of those who have ever served in active duty, analyzing 24 health measures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) – the world's largest, annual population-based telephone survey of over 400,000 people. The measures include indicators of health behaviors, health outcomes and utilization of key health care services. United Health Foundation also produces the annual America's Health Rankings Annual Report and has recently expanded its reporting series to include a number of spotlight reports focused on important markers of the nation's health, including prevention and the impacts of unhealthy behaviors, and population reports on the health of seniors and the health of women and children.

Health of Those Who Have Served Report 2016, Executive Summary

November 1, 2016

United Health Foundation is committed to helping communities across the country understand the similarities and differences between the health of those who have served and those who have not served (hereafter referred to as "civilians" for the purposes of this document). America's Health Rankings Health of Those Who Have Served Report reflects United Health Foundation's commitment to offering data-driven insights that can stimulate dialogue and action that continues to advance the health of those who have served, and builds upon the United Health Foundation's philanthropic initiatives to support members of the U.S. Armed Forces, veterans, and their families across the country.America's Health Rankings, in partnership with Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), collaborated with an advisory steering group of leading military and veterans and public health organizations to develop a holistic study of the health of those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces compared with the health of civilians. The report establishes a baseline portrait of the health of those who have served, analyzing 24 health measures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)–the world's largest, annual population-based telephone survey of more than 400,000 people.

America's Health Rankings Senior Report: A Call to Action for Individuals and Their Communities, 2016 Edition

May 24, 2016

The 2016 America's Health Rankings® Senior Report provides a comprehensive analysis of senior population health on a national and state-by-state basis across 35 measures of senior health. Now in its fourth year, it continues to serve as a resource for individuals, community leaders, policymakers, public health officials, and the media to benchmark each state's performance on key measures of health and wellness for the senior population.

America's Health Rankings: A Call to Action for Individuals and Their Communities - 25th Anniversary Edition 2014

December 7, 2014

While we celebrate America's Health Rankings and our nation's significant health gains, we also don't want to lose sight of the sobering challenges we face. Regarding gains, Americans have made significant progress in several key lifespan measures, including life expectancy, which, at 78.8 years, is the highest ever. We have seen significant declines in premature death, infant mortality, cancer and cardiovascular deaths. Also, the steady decline in smoking stands out as a major health accomplishment. Regarding challenges, Americans have yet to achieve widespread, uniform success in preventing chronic health conditions such as obesity and diabetes. Obesity -- a leading contributor to death in the US -- has risen at a troubling pace. Since 1990, obesity has increased 153%, from 11.6% to 29.4% of adults. After improving slightly in 2013, obesity rates rose again last year. Also, since it emerged as a metric 20 years ago, self-reported diabetes has more than doubled and is at 9.6% of the adult population. Another challenge: Physical inactivity remains high with 23.5% of adults reporting they've done no physical activity or exercise in the last 30 days; that level of inactivity has not changed appreciably for the last decade.

America's Health Rankings Senior Report: A Call to Action for Individuals and Their Communities, 2013 Edition

May 13, 2013

The 2012 Edition of America's Health Rankings revealed that Americans are now living longer lives, but with increased rates of preventable chronic disease. If our nation's seniors are unhealthy, can we be healthy as a society? Today, 1 in 8 Americans are aged 65 or older. By the year 2050, this age group is projected to more than double in size, from 40.3 million to 88.5 million. The increasing number of older adults combined with increasing rates of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases are on track to overwhelm our health care system. In no other aspect is this more true than the cost of health care. Adults aged 65 and older spend nearly twice as much as 45 to 64 year olds on health care each year. They spend 3 to 5 times more than all adults younger than 65.3. The health needs of older adults are not only more costly but also differ greatly from the younger population. Nearly 80 percent of seniors have already been diagnosed with at least 1 chronic condition and half have been diagnosed with at least 2.4. The increased burden of chronic disease among older adults affects not only the number of visits to a health professional and the number of medications they take, but also their overall well-being. As seniors age, challenges such as limited mobility, social isolation, and the need for long-term care become increasingly common. These issues extend far beyond the health care system because they encompass the ability of communities to accommodate limited-mobility residents and the ability of families and communities to provide long-term care needs. This report includes the following commentaries:"Senior Report -- Working Together to Care for an Aging Nation", authored by Jennie Chin Hansen, RN, MSN, FAAN, CEO of the American Geriatrics Society, who discusses the importance of geriatricians and geriatric specialists in treating the multiple and complex medical needs of older adults."Preparing for the Future as Millions of Baby Boomers Continue to Age", authored by Gail Gibson Hunt, President and CEO, National Alliance for Caregiving, who discusses the important role of family caregivers in caring for seniors."Rx for Health -- Invest in America's Senior Centers to Promote Health and Prevent Disease",authored by James Firman, Ed.D., President and CEO, and Richard Birkel, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, National Council on Aging, who recommend further investing in the capacity of senior centers to more fully leverage the role they play in improving the health of seniors."Senior Hunger: A National Problem, A Local Problem", authored by Enid A. Borden, Founder, President and CEO, and Margaret B. Ingraham, Executive Vice President, National Foundation to End Senior Hunger, who highlight the growing issue of senior hunger."The Environment of Care: A Community's Journey to Become America's Healthiest Hometown", authored by Elliot Sussman, MD, MBA, Chairman, and Joseph Hildner, MD, Chief Medical Of?cer, The Villages Health, and Stephen Klasko, MD, MBA, CEO, USF Health and Dean, Morsani College of Medicine, who discuss health care transformation in The Villages, a retirement community in central Florida.