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Bipartisan Support for Early In-Person Voting, Voter ID, Election Day National Holiday

February 7, 2024

Americans generally believe that voting is an effective way to bring about positive change in the country. But in recent years, there have been contentious debates in a number of states over the rules around voting and elections.A new national survey finds deep partisan divisions over some voting policies, especially voting by mail.Yet other proposals draw widespread public support, including from majorities in both partisan coalitions:Requiring paper ballot backups for electronic voting machines (82% favor this),Requiring people to show government-issued photo identification to vote (81%),Making early voting available for two weeks prior to Election Day (76%),Making Election Day a national holiday (72%) andAllowing convicted felons to vote after serving their sentences (69%).The Pew Research Center survey, conducted Jan. 16-21 among 5,140 adults, also finds smaller majorities supporting allowing anyone to vote by mail if they want to (57%), as well as automatic and Election Day voter registration (57% each).Americans are more divided on whether groups should be banned from collecting completed ballots to return to official voting centers (47% favor, 50% oppose) and whether people should be removed from registration lists if they have not voted recently or confirmed their registration (44% favor, 55% oppose).

Teens, Social Media and Technology 2023: YouTube, TikTok, Snapchat and Instagram remain the most widely used online platforms among U.S. teens

December 11, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand teens' use of digital devices, social media and other online platforms.The Center conducted an online survey of 1,453 U.S. teens from Sept. 26 to Oct. 23, 2023, through Ipsos. Ipsos recruited the teens via their parents, who were part of its KnowledgePanel. The KnowledgePanel is a probability-based web panel recruited primarily through national, random sampling of residential addresses. The survey was weighted to be representative of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 who live with their parents by age, gender, race and ethnicity, household income, and other categories.This research was reviewed and approved by an external institutional review board (IRB), Advarra, an independent committee of experts specializing in helping to protect the rights of research participants.

How Americans View Future Harms From Climate Change in Their Community and Around the U.S.

October 25, 2023

A new Pew Research Center survey finds a majority of Americans think climate change is causing harm to people in the United States today and 63% expect things to get worse in their lifetime.When it comes to the personal impact of climate change, most Americans think they'll have to make at least minor sacrifices over their lifetime because of climate change, but a relatively modest share think climate impacts will require them to make major sacrifices in their own lives.July 2023 was hotter than any other month in the global temperature record, and the United Nations climate panel has warned of growing impacts from climate change barring major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.The Center survey of 8,842 U.S. adults conducted Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2023, finds that 43% of Americans think climate change is causing a great deal or quite a bit of harm to people in the U.S. today. An additional 28% say it is causing some harm.

Americans’ Dismal Views of the Nation’s Politics

September 19, 2023

Americans have long been critical of politicians and skeptical of the federal government. But today, Americans' views of politics and elected officials are unrelentingly negative, with little hope of improvement on the horizon.Majorities say the political process is dominated by special interests, flooded with campaign cash and mired in partisan warfare. Elected officials are widely viewed as self-serving and ineffective.A comprehensive new Pew Research Center study of the state of the nation's politics finds no single focal point for the public's dissatisfaction. There is widespread criticism of the three branches of government, both political parties, as well as political leaders and candidates for office. 

For Most U.S. Gun Owners, Protection Is the Main Reason They Own a Gun

August 16, 2023

Gun owners in the United States continue to cite protection far more than other factors, including hunting and sport shooting, as a major reason they own a gun.And while a sizable majority of gun owners (71%) say they enjoy having a gun, an even larger share (81%) say they feel safer owning a gun.A Pew Research Center survey, conducted June 5-11 among 5,115 members of the Center's nationally representative American Trends Panel, finds:72% of U.S. gun owners say protection is a major reason they own a gun. That far surpasses the shares of gun owners who cite other reasons.

Gun Violence Widely Viewed as a Major – and Growing – National Problem

June 28, 2023

With total gun-related deaths reaching new highs in recent years, growing shares of Americans view both gun violence and violent crime as very big national problems.Looking ahead, twice as many Americans expect the level of gun violence to increase rather than stay about the same over the next five years (62% vs. 31%). Just 7% say it will decrease.

Majorities of Americans Prioritize Renewable Energy, Back Steps to Address Climate Change

June 25, 2023

A new Pew Research Center survey finds large shares of Americans support the United States taking steps to address global climate change and back an energy landscape that prioritizes renewable sources like wind and solar. At the same time, the findings illustrate ongoing public reluctance to make sweeping changes to American life to cut carbon emissions. Most Americans oppose ending the production of gas-powered vehicles by 2035 and there's limited support for steps like eliminating gas lines from new buildings.This report comes about a year after the 2022 Inflation Reduction Act introduced policies and incentives meant to dramatically reduce the country's reliance on fossil fuels, a signature part of the Biden administration's efforts on climate change. The survey takes stock of how Americans feel about related questions on climate, energy and environmental policy, including proposed changes to how Americans power their homes and cars and what to do about the impacts communities face from extreme weather.

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Workplace

May 17, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand how adults in the United States think about diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in the workplace. This analysis is based on survey responses from 4,744 U.S. adults who are working part time or full time, are not selfemployed, have only one job or have multiple jobs but consider one their primary job, and whose company or organization has 10 or more people. The data was collected as part of a larger survey of workers conducted Feb. 6-12, 2023. Everyone who took part is a member of Pew Research Center's American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP's methodology.

Diverse Cultures and Shared Experiences Shape Asian American Identities

May 8, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this analysis to understand the rich diversity of people of Asian origin or ancestry living in the United States and their views of identity. The study is part of the Center's multiyear, comprehensive, in-depth quantitative and qualitative research effort focused on the nation's Asian population. Its centerpiece is this nationally representative survey of 7,006 Asian adults exploring the experiences, attitudes and views of Asians living in the U.S. The survey sampled U.S. adults who self-identify as Asian, either alone or in combination with other races or Hispanic ethnicity. It was offered in six languages: Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), English, Hindi, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese. Responses were collected from July 5, 2022, to Jan. 27, 2023, by Westat on behalf of Pew Research Center.

Nearly a Year After Roe’s Demise, Americans’ Views of Abortion Access Increasingly Vary by Where They Live

April 26, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand Americans' views on the legality of abortion, as well as their perceptions about abortion access. For this analysis, we surveyed 5,079 adults from March 27 to April 2, 2023. Everyone who took part in this survey is a member of the Center's American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories.

In a Growing Share of U.S. Marriages, Husbands and Wives Earn About the Same

April 13, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand the role women and men play as economic providers in opposite-sex marriages and how this relates to the way spouses divide their time between paid work, leisure, caregiving and housework. We also looked at public attitudes about gender roles in marriages today to put the findings in a broader context.The analysis in this report is based on three separate data sources. The earnings data comes from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the U.S. Census Bureau's Current Population Survey. The findings on hours devoted to paid work, household responsibilities and leisure are based on data from the American Time Use Survey. The data on public attitudes was collected as part of a larger Center survey of 5,152 U.S. adults conducted Jan. 18-24, 2023. Everyone who took part in the latter is a member of Pew Research Center's American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories.

Parenting in America Today

January 24, 2023

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand how American parents approach parenting. This analysis is based on 3,757 U.S. parents with children under age 18. The data was collected as part of a larger survey of parents with children younger than 18 conducted Sept. 20 to Oct. 2, 2022. Most of the parents who took part are members of the Center's American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This survey also included an oversample of Black, Hispanic and Asian parents from Ipsos' KnowledgePanel, another probability-based online survey web panel recruited primarily through national, random sampling of residential addresses.