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Limits on Access to Asylum After Title 42: One Month of Monitoring U.S.-Mexico Border Ports of Entry

June 23, 2023

Following the end of Title 42 and the implementation of new restrictions, a working group of U.S., Mexican, and international NGOs that provide humanitarian and legal support to asylum seekers and migrants in the border region conducted targeted in-person monitoring at ports of entry to understand the impact of these policy shifts on access to asylum. Between May 11 and June 12, 2023, observations took place at six ports of entry in California (San Ysidro and Otay Mesa), Arizona (Dennis DeConcini), and Texas (Bridge of the Americas, Paso Del Norte and Ysleta) that adjoin the Mexican cities of Tijuana, Nogales, and Ciudad Juárez.The monitors' key findings include practices by U.S. and Mexican authorities that restricted asylum seekers without CBP One appointments from physically reaching ports of entry; limited processing or metering of asylum seekers without CBP One appointments; and a lack of adequate and accurate information for asylum seekers.

Maternal and Newborn Health in Humanitarian Settings

May 1, 2023

A brochure about the IRC's work to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes across the humanitarian and fragile settings where we work.

Community-Based Maternal and Newborn Health Care

May 1, 2023

A brief about IRC's multi-pronged initiative to expand access to care by bring life-saving MNH services closer to women and newborns within their homes and communities.

Empowering Frontline Staff to Enable the Participation of Crisis-Affected People: Learning Report

April 19, 2023

Frontline staff play a critical role in enabling the participation of crisis-affected people in the design and delivery of humanitarian assistance. They are frequently described as the 'bridge' between the organization and the communities they serve, helping to build understanding, trust, and safe access.In response to the global humanitarian community's recognition that we have made limited progress on accountability to affected populations (AAP), the BHA-funded Empower to Enable project aims to share knowledge and create practical solutions that will advance our commitments to AAP by more effectively utilizing frontline staff to enable the participation of crisis-affected people.The Empower to Enable project has produced a Learning Report that offers insight into some of the factors that empower frontline staff to enable the participation of crisis- affected people; the barriers that limit their potential; and changes that humanitarian organizations can make to better support their frontline staff to enable the participation of crisis-affected people.

She Pays the Highest Price: The Toll of Conflict on Sexual and Reproductive Health in Northwest Syria

March 14, 2023

Targeted violence against health care has impacted the availability of and access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care, including basic and specialized services. This has resulted in:SRH services are insufficient due to limited staff, facilities, equipment, supplies, and medication across northwest Syria.SRH care provision is limited, among other things, by the fact that many health care facilities have been built in, or relocated to, geographic areas far from the front lines, limiting access to SRH services for communities close to conflict zones. Because of the large population and demand in safer areas, these facilities experience significant overcrowding.In areas where SRH services are largely unavailable, respondents reported harmful coping practices, including postponing essential SRH visits and forgoing medication.When required SRH services are not available or practically inaccessible, there are far-reaching, negative consequences for women's health, including for both their psychosocial well-being and that of their children.The most marginalized people, including women residing in camps, those with a disability, those with limited income, and those married at a young age, are most adversely impacted by the paucity of SRH care.

The Toll of Conflict on Sexual and Reproductive Health in Northwest Syria (Arabic)

March 14, 2023

Targeted violence against health care has impacted the availability of and access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care, including basic and specialized services. This has resulted in:SRH services are insufficient due to limited staff, facilities, equipment, supplies, and medication across northwest Syria.SRH care provision is limited, among other things, by the fact that many health care facilities have been built in, or relocated to, geographic areas far from the front lines, limiting access to SRH services for communities close to conflict zones. Because of the large population and demand in safer areas, these facilities experience significant overcrowding.In areas where SRH services are largely unavailable, respondents reported harmful coping practices, including postponing essential SRH visits and forgoing medication.When required SRH services are not available or practically inaccessible, there are far-reaching, negative consequences for women's health, including for both their psychosocial well-being and that of their children.The most marginalized people, including women residing in camps, those with a disability, those with limited income, and those married at a young age, are most adversely impacted by the paucity of SRH care.

Economic Experience of Afghans Who Arrived Through Operation Allies Welcome

August 11, 2022

The Economic Empowerment Team for U.S. Programs at the IRC worked on this report to illustrate the economic experiences and potential projected impact of Afghans who arrived through Operations Allies Welcome. This study revealed that Afghan parolees in the United States could contribute up to $200 million in taxes and $1.4 billion in earnings in their first year of employment alone. 

Hunger fallout: How the G7 can prevent the war in Ukraine from escalating the global hunger crisis

May 17, 2022

The devastating impact of the war in Ukraine is being felt by crisis-affected communities around the world. People living in low-income, food import-dependent countries already impacted by conflict, COVID-19 and climate change are now suffering from the ripple effects of food supply chain disruptions, skyrocketing food prices and rising inflation.Drawing on the IRC's work in food insecure contexts, this report outlines how the ripple effects of the war in Ukraine are compounding a pre-existing hunger crisis, and how the G7 and wider international community can prevent the war from pushing other vulnerable communities closer to famine.

IRC assessment of humanitarian needs of refugees fleeing Ukraine in Poland

April 1, 2022

Months of escalating hostility towards Ukraine have culminated in an estimated 4 million refugees having fled the country. As of March 26, 2022, 2.2M people have fled to neighbouring Poland.Many have been welcomed by the Ukrainian diaspora in Poland, many more are being hosted by Polish families, and the rest reside in recently established shelters and reception centers. While the Polish government, Polish NGOs, UN agencies, and local civil society actors have provided multisectoral relief across the country, this rapid needs assessment aims to better understand the priority needs, vulnerabilities, and barriers to accessing information, services, and humanitarian support that people fleeing the conflict in Ukraine face in Poland, including those experienced by groups with heightened vulnerability. This assessment will be used to inform the IRC's strategic response to these displaced populations in Poland and will be widely shared with the overall humanitarian community, including with Polish civil society and governmental bodies who have provided rapid and much needed relief to people fleeing the conflict in Ukraine. 

Protection Denied: Humanitarian Consequences at the U.S. Southern Border One Year Into the Biden Administration

January 14, 2022

On February 2, 2021, less than two weeks after taking office, the Biden administration issued a series of presidential actions regarding immigration, including an executive order to provide safe and orderly processing of asylum seekers at the United States border. The executive order promised to restore and strengthen the U.S. asylum system through safe, orderly, and humane reception and processing of asylum seekers at the border, noting that immigrants have made the U.S. stronger and better for generations and that policies enacted under the Trump administration contravened U.S. values and caused needless suffering.One year into the Biden administration, however, some of the most severe Trump-era policies that have decimated access to asylum — commonly known as "Title 42" and "Remain in Mexico" — remain in force. These measures effectively "externalize" asylum beyond U.S. borders, making U.S. territory unreachable to foreign nationals who do not have permission to enter – even if they are exercising their human right to seek asylum – and require Mexico and other countries to carry increasingly challenging burdens to meet humanitarian needs.This report provides an update on continued externalization of asylum and the resulting humanitarian impacts at the U.S.-Mexico border. The first year of the Biden administration has demonstrated the real dangers of border externalization — both to vulnerable migrants in need of protection and to the humanitarian organizations working to protect their rights and meet their basic needs.

A Toolkit for Integrating Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) Into Humanitarian Response: The Full Guide

October 6, 2017

The menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in Emergencies project is a collaboration between the International Rescue Committee and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and is supported by Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC). The aim of this project is to improve the guidance available to humanitarian responders who need to incorporate MHM into their programming during emergencies. Formative assessments were conducted in two humanitarian response settings (Myanmar and Lebanon) at the onset of the project in addition to interviews with global humanitarian experts, a major meeting of specialists across sectors and agencies, and a desk review. The toolkit was then piloted in an on-going emergency context (refugee camps in Tanzania) where it was evaluated and further improved upon.The toolkit looks at MHM from a multi-sectoral perspective and aims to give practical, streamlined guidance to humanitarian workers. The toolkit is co-published by 27 leading organizations that work in the humanitarian sphere. 

More than Six Months Stranded - What Now? A Joint Policy Brief on the Situation for Displaced Persons in Greece

April 3, 2017

This briefing paper is the result of a joint effort by 12 national and international organizations operating in Greece. The aim is to explain the current situation for those stranded in Greece for over six months since the closure of the northern border and introduction of the European Union (EU) - Turkey deal.These events changed Greece from a transit country to a country hosting tens of thousands of displaced persons for a still undefined, yet long-term, period. The briefing and recommendations presented are based on programmatic assessments as well as daily work and interaction with the displaced throughout Greece. Our hope is that this briefing and our joint recommendations will be of use to all actors engaged in addressing the situation and improving the response for those in need of protection in Greece.