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Global Resources Report

June 8, 2022

This report documents over 15,000 grants awarded by499 foundations, intermediary NGOs, and corporations and by 17 donorgovernment and multilateral agencies. The report provides details on thedistribution of LGBTI funding by geography, issue, strategy, populationfocus, and donor type. It is a tool for identifying trends, gaps, andopportunities in the rapidly changing philanthropic and developmentlandscapes

Where Are the Global COVID-19 Resources for LGBTI Communities?

January 1, 2021

In September 2020, Global Philanthropy Project conducted a second-phase survey of the leading government, multilateral, and philanthropic funders of global LGBTI issues, receiving responses from a group of funders who account for just under half of all global LGBTI funding. The findings from that survey, as well as a review of COVID-19 global humanitarian response funding, inform Where are the Global COVID-19 Resources for LGBTI Communities?The report found that in 2020, many LGBTI organizations across the world responded by shifting from human rights-focused programs to providing local humanitarian relief. Despite this, LGBTI communities have been largely excluded from COVID-19 humanitarian resources. The report outlines the potential long-term implications of the pandemic on global LGBTI movement resources.

Meet the Moment: A Call for Progressive Philanthropic Response to the Anti-Gender Movement

November 12, 2020

In early 2020, Global Philanthropy Project worked with our member organizations and philanthropic partners to develop two related pieces of private research: 1) a report mapping the funding of the global "anti-gender ideology" or "anti-gender" movement, and 2) a report mapping the progressive philanthropic response. We offer the following public document in order to share key learning and to offer additional analysis gained in the comparison of the two reports. Additionally, we share insights based on comparing global and regional LGBTI funding data as documented in the 2017-2018 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities.These findings offer a clear call to action: progressive movements and their philanthropic partners are being outspent by hundreds of millions of dollars each year, and the institutions providing that opposition funding have developed sophisticated and coordinated systems to learn, co-fund, and expand their influence. The philanthropic community is called to recognize the scale of the fight and to be both rigorous and creative in our response. Let us seize this remarkable opportunity to work together and engage our collective learning, spending power, and institutional knowledge to help transform the conditions of our communities. Together we can leverage the collective power that this generational crisis demands. 

2017/2018 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities

June 22, 2020

We are pleased to present The 2017–2018 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, a comprehensive report on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report documents data on 19,764 grants awarded by 800 foundations, intermediary NGOs, and corporations and by 15 donor government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2017–2018. The report provides detailed data on the distribution of LGBTI funding by geography, issue, strategy, and population focus, offering a tool for identifying trends, gaps, and opportunities in the rapidly changing landscape of LGBTI funding.The 2017–2018 Global Resources Report builds on two previous editions, which focused on grantmaking in the calendar years 2013–2014 and 2015–16. With this third edition, we have now documented comprehensive data through six calendar years of grantmaking, allowing us to conduct a deeper analysis of LGBTI funding trend lines over time. In many sections of this report, we offer a comparison with the previous report documenting 2015–16, and in some key places we share analysis across the full six-year period.This third report represents a continuing and evolving collaboration between two philanthropic networks, Global Philanthropy Project and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. The trust developed between these networks has enabled us to adjust the report development process over time as we identify opportunities to activate the unique competencies and assets of both networks. In this iteration of the process, Global Philanthropy Project coordinated development and analysis of the data from foundations and corporations based outside of the United States (U.S.) and from all government and multilateral institutions. Funders for LGBTQ Issues coordinated development and analysis of the data from foundations and corporations based in the U.S., and provided generous overall guidance based on more than a decade of experience producing the comprehensive annual U.S. domestic tracking report on LGBTQI funding.

2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities

April 24, 2018

Funders for LGBTQ Issues and Global Philanthropy Project are pleased to share with you The 2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, the most comprehensive report to date on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report captures data on 12,964 grants awarded by 511 foundations, intermediaries, and corporations and by 15 government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2015-2016. It builds upon the first edition of the Global Resources Report, which was released two years ago and focused on grantmaking in the calendar years 2013-2014. With this second volume, we now have comprehensive data on four calendar years of grantmaking, allowing us to conduct a deeper analysis of the trendlines for LGBTI funding over time. In several sections of this report, we offer not only a snapshot of funding for 2015-2016, but also an analysis of how funding has shifted over a four-year period. 

2013-2014 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Communities

July 6, 2016

The 2013-2014 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian,Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, is the most comprehensive report to date on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This first-of-its-kind report captures data on 9,632 grants awarded by 415 foundations, intermediaries, and corporations and by 16 government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2013-2014. It provides detailed data on the distribution of LGBTI fundingby geography, issue, strategy, and population focus, offering a baseline for identifying trends, gaps, and opportunities in the rapidly changing landscape of LGBTI funding.

The Perfect Storm: The Closing Space for LGBT Civil Society in Kyrgyzstan, Indonesia, Kenya, and Hungary

April 22, 2016

While the late 20th century saw a blossoming of civil society organizations, the beginning of the 21st century has been a period of upheaval. In response to both the threat of terrorism and to growing populist pressure for democracy, transparency, and government accountability, states have used new laws and tactics to restrict freedom of association and freedom of expression. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) organizations have always faced such barriers, ranging from criminalization of same-sex sexuality, to refusal of the right to register organizations or hold public events, to the shutdown of websites. In recent years, some countries have also ratified new laws that explicitly prohibit groups engaged in "LGBT propaganda." In other countries, politicians have mobilized resurgent nationalism by publicly scapegoating LGBT groups as representing "foreign values." These overlapping trends have created a "perfect storm" for LGBT civil society organizations caught in simultaneous waves of political pressure. This report examines how these forces are affecting LGBT groups in four countries: Kyrgyzstan, Indonesia, Hungary, and Kenya. The report also highlights these groups' resilience, and how many have found ways to survive and thrive in restrictive and often threatening environments.

SOGI-Related Forced Migration in East Africa: Fleeing Uganda After the Passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act

July 1, 2015

Over the past decade, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Ugandans have sought safety and asylum in various countries, but never in such numbers or with such a high degree of visibility as following the passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act in December 2013. When reports of LGBT Ugandans seeking refuge in Kenya began to surface in the months following, many international donors and LGBT activists in the region felt at a loss for how to respond. Stories of LGBT Ugandans in the Kakuma refugee camp and Nairobi highlighted difficult living conditions, harassment, arrests and violence. Refugee service providers, including the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), struggled to respond to the unexpected influx, one that coincided with a government crackdown on refugees in Kenya. It seemed that the Ugandans had left one hostile and insecure environment for another, yet the numbers continued to grow. Instead of slowing, following the Anti-Homosexuality Act's nullification in August 2014, the stream of asylum seekers from Uganda continued and even increased. Donors and activists alike felt that they lacked the full picture of what was occurring, why, and what the range of possible and appropriate interventions could be. This research sought to gain a greater understanding of the LGBT Ugandans who fled their country following the bill's passage, to determine (to the extent possible) their numbers and characteristics, and to capture some of their experiences of asylum seeking. It examines the constellation and interaction of push and pull factors underlying this unprecedented outflow. It also looks at the impacts of this migration on service providers, pre-existing refugee communities, LGBT led organizations and the LGBT rights movements in Uganda and Kenya. The research engaged more than 100 respondents from a broad cross-section of stakeholders. These included LGBT Ugandan asylum seekers in Kenya and abroad; LGBT-led organizations in Uganda, Kenya and the Ugandan diaspora; organizations focused on legal aid, protection and security, and refugee service provision; UNHCR in Kenya; international funders and other actors providing emergency assistance. It is important to note that this is not an exhaustive examination of all the contexts in which LGBT Ugandans are seeking refuge. Because the greatest number of LGBT Ugandan forced migrants appears to have sought safety in Kenya, much of the research focused there. Many individuals have fled to other places, particularly in North America and Europe, and some limited information on these situations has been integrated into the report. The findings of the research are intended to inform the individuals and organizations who have been responding or wish to respond to this complex situation; to help strengthen protection mechanisms within Uganda and Kenya; and to support proactive and sustainable interventions to address LGBT forced migration. While the recommendations are focused on the situation related to Uganda, it is hoped that they have relevance to the region more broadly and wherever similar situations may arise.