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Deepening the Divide: Abortion Bans Further Harm Immigrant Communities

August 15, 2023

Immigrants, especially undocumented individuals and those in mixed-status families, are particularly vulnerable to the harmful impacts of abortion bans due to their unique barriers to care and increased risk of criminalization based on immigration status. Immigrants' barriers to abortion care include arbitrary Customs and Border Protection (CBP) checkpoints, a five-year waiting period for legal permanent residents to enroll in public health insurance programs, and agreements between local law enforcement and federal immigration authorities. Individuals in immigrant detention face additional threats to their reproductive health and overall well-being, including denial of abortion care and medically unnecessary gynecological procedures like forced hysterectomies. This factsheet highlights how the overturn of Roe v. Wade exacerbated pre-existing barriers to abortion care for immigrants. We propose a set of concrete recommendations for Congress and the Administration to support immigrant access to abortion.

The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act: Mental Health Wins Undermined for Black and Brown Youth

January 12, 2023

Passed in June 2022, the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act (BSCA) came at a time in our country when legislation on both mental health and gun violence prevention was overdue. While generally upheld as a major legislative victory that expands federal investments in mental health supports, the BSCA also includes a series of provisions that will disproportionately harm the mental health of young people who are Black, brown, disabled, low income, and LGBTQIA+.This brief provides an overview of the key mental health provisions in the act, gives a timeline of expected implementation, and offers recommendations for mental health policies that center equity.

Poor Job Quality Keeps Women of Color from Economic Opportunity

July 8, 2022

More than two years into the public health emergency, individuals and families continue to experience the ongoing economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recent job numbers show that the U.S. economy is on a path to recovery as jobs return and labor force participation increases at a steady pace. However, even with these positive trends, women of color continue to face disproportionate challenges.To create an equitable path forward in economic recovery, we must ensure that the quality of jobs grows alongside the number of people employed. Building a resilient and sustainable recovery for women of color requires addressing the lack of benefits, worker protections, and well-paying jobs so that women of color can thrive.

Disproportionately Impacted: Closing the Racial Wealth Gap through Student Loan Cancellation, Payment Reforms, and Investment in College Affordability

June 8, 2022

In this paper, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and the National Consumer Law Center (NCLC) explore the disproportionate impact of student debt on Black borrowers. We also make recommendations to address the dual student loan and college affordability crises through federal policies and executive action. These steps include administrative action to extend the student loan payment pause; ensure a smooth transition of loan accounts to new servicers; provide increased protections for borrowers, particularly those who are victims of predatory lending and for-profit colleges; improve existing repayment options, including Income-Driven Repayment (IDR); and invest in college affordability through federal grants like the Pell Grant, a federal free community college program, and support for student basic needs.

Designing Equitable Community Violence Intervention Strategies with Employment and Workforce Supports

April 26, 2022

On January 4, 2022, the U.S. Department of Labor issued a Training and Employment Notice[1] providing local workforce boards, American Job Centers (AJCs), workforce development partners, and grantees with information on supporting community violence intervention (CVI) strategies that include an employment or workforce component.In this brief, the Center for Law and Social Policy offers recommendations for supporting the design and implementation of community violence interventions based on research and practice evidence.

Subsidized Jobs for People Experiencing or At-Risk of Homelessness

May 27, 2021

This advocacy resource makes the case for why Congress must enact an equity-centered national subsidized employment program as a part of COVID-19 economic recovery legislation, with a special focus on how subsidized employment strategies can benefit jobseekers experiencing or at-risk of homelessness. This resource was produced in partnership among Heartland Alliance, the Center for Law & Social Policy (CLASP), and the National Youth Employment Coalition. Subsidized employment advocates can use this resource to inform visits with elected officials about why subsidized employment must be a part of building back a better, stronger, and more inclusive and equitable economy in the wake of the COVID-19 recession. 

Subsidized Employment: A Proven Strategy for Supporting Rapid Economic Recovery

May 13, 2021

This advocacy resource makes the case for why Congress must enact an equity-centered national subsidized employment programas a part of COVID-19 economic recovery legislation, as called for in the White House's proposed American Jobs Plan. This resource was produced in partnership among Heartland Alliance, the Center for Law & Social Policy (CLASP), and the National Youth Employment Coalition. Subsidized employment advocates can use this resource to inform visits with elected officials about why subsidized employment must be a part of building back a better, stronger, and more inclusive and equitable economy in the wake of the COVID-19 recession. 

Parents And Children Thriving Together: A Framework For Two-Generation Policy And System Reform

January 1, 2020

This brief explores the lessons learned from the 2016 Parents and Children Thriving Together: Two Generation State Policy Network (PACTT Network), a collaboration between the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) with funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Through this initiative, five states explored how to use the two-generation approach to improve their state systems that serve children and parents. This brief summarizes the lessons learned from the two-year initiative and provides a framework to help guide state leaders trying to implement two-generation strategies.

State and Federal Policy Opportunities to Improve the Lives of Infants and Toddlers and their Families

December 11, 2018

As a nation, we are failing our youngest children. Too many infants and toddlers in the United States lack the resources they need to thrive during this formative period, putting them at risk of poor health, material hardship, and chronic stress. The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and ZERO TO THREE call on federal and state policymakers to embrace a bold policy agenda—one that invests in and optimizes proven programs and seizes new opportunities to make policies work better for families with young children. For such policies to be successful, increased state and federal resources are vital. Current investments are insufficient to meet the needs of families with young children, hampering the effectiveness and accessibility of public policies and programs. The following brief summarizes a number of policy considerations for legislators and program administrators.

Michigan’s Infant and Toddler Action Agenda: A Policy and Opportunity Profile for Michigan’s Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

November 7, 2018

Michigan has over 330,000 infants and toddlers. Current policies aren't meeting their needs. Children's growth and development are shaped by early life experiences. Good health, secure and stable families, and positive early learning environments foster children's physical, intellectual, and social-emotional development. This profile providesdemographic information about Michigan's infants and toddlers and their families. It also explains the current policy landscape, including threats and opportunities at the state level, as well as proposed policy actions to improve wellbeing.

Building Strong Foundations: Racial Inequity in Policies that Impact Infants, Toddlers, and Families

November 1, 2018

Infants and toddlers of color and their families have been systematically denied opportunities and access to resources. Addressing disparities will require an expanded investment in public programs for families with low incomes, along with public policy reforms that reduce structural inequality.

Eliminating Asset Limits: Creating Savings for Families and State Governments

April 20, 2018

This paper examines how asset limits run counter to the goals of TANF and SNAP of supporting recipients in work and enabling them to advance economically.