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Voices of Partners: Findings from the Community/Stakeholder Engagement Study

September 29, 2017

Building Healthy Communities has brought significant value and impact in the fights for health equity and health justice in our communities and across our state, and we need to continue this work and this journey. We have contributed to a new narrative for community health—we appreciate the emphasis on inclusion, justice, and equity, and we have seen real policy and systems improvements in several key areas. But in order for us to optimize the potential impact of Building Healthy Communities, The California Endowment (TCE) must do better on certain fronts. We need more humility from TCE, and less arrogance; we need more true partnership, and less top-down; we need more input into decisions, and not merely communications about decisions that have been made; we need more of an emphasis from TCE on building our capacity to lead change, and less 'doing and directing' from TCE staff. Finally, we need a combination of stronger alignment of efforts, improved communications about efforts, and more private sector resources rallying to the vision of BHC. So, stay in the fight—we want to own BHC, and this is how we'd like to see you raise your game.

Heard, Not Judged: Insights Into the Talents, Realities and Needs of Young Men of Color

May 24, 2016

This report provides detailed findings about what boys and young men of color need in order to help them overcome the challenges and obstacles they face in their day-to-day lives. The report highlights the voices of young men in Oakland, New York City, Baltimore, Atlanta, New Orleans and Detroit as they opened up and shared what is on their minds and in their hearts. Among other things, the report focuses on four main areas: Values; Success and Optimal Health; Competition/Winning/Skills and Creative Talents; and Existing Resources for African-American Males.

A New Power Grid: Building Healthy Communities at Year 5

May 10, 2016

This document communicates our progress, lessons learned and key changes. We do so in the spirit of accountability to three sets of audiences: the community leaders with whom we work, the fields of philanthropy and public health, and ourselves as an organization. It has been five years since we first launched Building Healthy Communities (BHC) at a celebratory event in City Heights with First Lady Michelle Obama. And during that time our Board, staff and BHC partners have been working hard to catalyze the kind of changes needed to bring us closer to the goal of health and justice for all.

The Social and Economic Impacts of FreshWorks: An Examination of Three Northgate Gonzalez Grocery Store Investments

May 1, 2016

In order to better understand and maximize FreshWorks' impact, TCE commissioned a two-year evaluation of the program's food access, social, and economic outcomes. The evaluation also sought to document the development and implementation of FreshWorks while identifying key lessons and insights. Given that FreshWorks is an early example of a statelevel fresh food financing initiative, the evaluation provides an opportunity to inform the greater healthy food movement going forward. The evaluation was led by a team of researchers experienced in evaluating health, social and economic outcomes. The team consists of the Sarah Samuels Center for Public Health Research and Evaluation, PCV InSight, Dr. Allison Karpyn of the University of Delaware, and Dr. Karen Glanz of the University of Pennsylvania.This report, one component of the evaluation, focuses on the economic and social impacts of the three Northgate González stores funded by FreshWorks. It seeks to answer two key research questions: * How does FreshWorks impact employment and job quality of workers in local communities, particularly in underserved communities? * What broader economic impacts do FreshWorks investments have in the communities where they are located?

California FreshWorks Food Access Report: An Examination of Three Northgate Gonzalez Grocery Store Investments

May 1, 2016

In order to better understand and maximize FreshWorks' impact, The California Endowment commissioned a two-year evaluation of the program's food access, social, and economic outcomes. The evaluation focused on the impact of three FreshWorks investments made with the purpose of increasing access to healthy food. The evaluation examined three new Northgate González Markets which received New Markets Tax Credit financing through FreshWorks.To understand the influence of FreshWorks on increasing access to healthy food and changing food purchase and consumption patterns in underserved communities, the evaluation team examined two key questions: 1. Are the new retail food stores meeting unmet need for grocery services? 2. How do community members perceive the benefits and/or negative consequences of the new stores?

California FreshWorks: A Case Study Examining the Development and Implementation of FreshWorks

May 1, 2016

TCE commissioned a two-year evaluation of FreshWorks to better understand the impact of the program on fresh food access, as well as social and economic outcomes. The evaluation also sought to document the development and implementation of FreshWorks while identifying key lessons and insights. Given that FreshWorks is an early example of a state-level healthy food financing initiative, the evaluation offers an opportunity to inform the broader healthy food movement going forward.This case study focuses on the development and implementation of FreshWorks, as well as key challenges encountered and lessons learned during the program's first years of operation. The evaluation team conducted interviews with FreshWorks investors, advisors, and other stakeholders in order to collect qualitative data documenting the Fund's origins and implementation process. These interviews formed the basis for the findings presented herein.

A New Power Grid: Building Health Communities at Year 5

January 1, 2016

We now have five years of implementation under our belt, plus a year or more of planning. We commissioned three independent reviews of our progress, lessons and mistakes. Over the past year, we reviewed the reports with our Board and staff, we listened to and learned from our community partners and we got busy making needed adjustments.This document communicates our progress, lessons learned and key changes. We do so in the spirit of accountability to three sets of audiences: the community leaders with whom we work, the fields of philanthropy and public health, and ourselves as an organization. Thanks for listening in.

Beyond Almonds and Blond Lawns: Investing in Non-Profit Organizations To Sustain Central Valley Communities Beyond the Drought

September 1, 2015

California and the San Joaquin Valley are in the midst of the worst drought in state history. Due to record low rainfall and snowpack, in January 2015 Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought State of Emergency and introduced drastic water cuts, including a 25% reduction of water use by all cities. The drought has caused significant disruption and distress in urban and rural water use, agricultural livelihoods, the larger economy, and day-to-day activities of residents across the state.The San Joaquin Valley is particularly hard-hit, with rural and low-income communities especially hurt by the drought, in the context of long-term changes in the agricultural economy, historically low economic development, poor infrastructure, and a frayed social-safety net.In spring 2015, the Fresno Regional Foundation began examining the impacts of the drought on San Joaquin Valley non-profit organizations that have been at the forefront of helping struggling individuals, families, and communities. This project focuses on community-benefit organizations (CBOs) to highlight the often hidden community-level impacts of the drought, since non-profits have not been the focus of previous studies, and because these organizations provide the critical link between philanthropic strategy and lasting social impact.The project gathered information and feedback from nonprofits through an on-line survey of San Joaquin Valley organizations, a series of stakeholder interviews, and four workshops with CBO leaders in Fresno, Merced, Visalia, and Bakersfield. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for how foundations and other investors can best assist CBOs to improve their impact and better serve vulnerable populations in the Valley.

Communications Strategies That Fast Track Policy Change

September 5, 2014

Partnering with Media Impact Funders for Communications Strategies that Fast Track Policy Change, The California Endowment aims to identify and share examples that use media and communications grantmaking to create a more receptive environment for dialogue about potential solutions, build public momentum and generate political will for policy change.

The California Endowment: How Can This Leading Health Equity Funder Bolster Its Community Impact?

June 20, 2014

The California Endowment (TCE) is actively moving the needle toward health equity through its support of national health reform, changes in school discipline policies and focused attention on the urgent needs of boys and men of color. Its primary grantmaking strategy, Building Healthy Communities (BHC), funds both statewide policy advocacy and targeted investments in 14 communities across California. By investing in efforts to build community power and also directly engaging in advocacy, TCE exemplifies strategic, social justice philanthropy at its best. However, some of TCE's grantmaking practices limit its grantees' effectiveness. To expand its impact, TCE could provide more general operating support, build nonprofit advocacy capacity and better align the large foundation's many efforts.

A Time for Action: Mobilizing Philanthropic Support for Boys and Young Men of Color

June 5, 2014

This executive summary provides a plan to maximize the potential of the private sector to work collectively with the public sector to improve life outcomes for America's boys and young men of color. The report outlines goals, identifies strategies for achieving those goals, and announces key initiatives and funding partnerships. [KEY FINDINGS]Goal 1: All boys and young men of color are health--socially, emotionally, mentally, behaviorally, and physically.Goal 2: All boys and young men of color are taught in rigorous, effective, culturally relevant, engaging, and supportive school environment.Goal 3: All boys and young men of color graduate from high school and postsecondary education prepared for success in their careers.Goal 4: Boys and young men of color's exposure to harm from the juvenile and criminal justice systems is dramatically reduced.Cross-sector strategies to improve outcomes for boys and young men of color include promoting youth leadership; changing harmful stereotypes; expanding place-based efforts; and building a pipeline of data, research, and innovation.

The Right to Dream: Promising Practices Improve Odds for Latino Men and Boys

March 1, 2014

This report is organized around five experiences that define social and economic equity for men and boys of color, which in turn highlight nine priorities that require our attention and investments in order to remove structural barriers to success and allow young Latino men to see a clear path toward a positive future.