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Cultivating Investment Opportunities in Fragile Contexts: Catalysing Market-Driven Solutions to Strengthen Community and Economy Resilience

May 24, 2022

The need to find new ways to help those affected by fragility, conflict, violence, extreme hunger and natural disasters has never been as urgent as it is today. Meanwhile, new opportunities are emerging for corporates and investors to expand involvement in humanitarian contexts beyond philanthropy and charity. This discussion paper outlines the pivotal support functions stakeholders across sectors have along the development stages of market-driven solutions on their pathway to scale, and the transformational dynamics that can take place if these forces act together in a more coordinated way to reach greater impact in fragile contexts. It is a call to action for a new form of collaboration between humanitarian and development organizations, businesses, investors and entrepreneurs to make a difference to the lives of the nearly 1 billion people living in fragile and conflict-affected settings worldwide.

The Ukraine Support Tracker: Which countries help Ukraine and how?

May 20, 2022

This paper presents the "Ukraine Support Tracker", which lists and quantifies military, financial and humanitarian aid to Ukraine in the context of the Russia-Ukraine war. This third version covers government commitments between January 24 and May 10, 2022. We now track support by 37 governments, including all G7 and European Union member countries, plus the support by EU institutions (thus including 38 donors). We also added a section estimating government cost of hosting Ukrainian refugees. Private donations and aid through non-governmental organizations are still not included due to a lack of systematic data. To value in-kind support like military equipment or weapons, we rely on government statements as well as own calculations using market prices. We find significant differences in the scale of support across countries, both in absolute terms and as percent of donor country GDP. In billions of Euros, by far the largest bilateral supporter of Ukraine is the United States, followed by Poland, the United Kingdom, and the EU institutions. In percent of donor GDP, Eastern European countries stand out as particularly generous, and this is even more so once we account for refugee costs.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #14

May 12, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 14 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 7,256 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,496 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In Ukraine, conflict remains concentrated in eastern and southern regions. According to OCHA, before 2022 eastern Ukraine was among the most minecontaminated regions in the world. Since the invasion, the State Emergency Service (SES) of Ukraine has disposed of more than 102,000 explosive devices and more than 1,900 aerial bombs. The Interior Minister announced the launch of the International Coordination Centre for Humanitarian Demining, which SES will work in collaboration with, to reduce casualties from explosive remnants of war.Since the invasion, almost 6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 12, at least 3,251,955 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 889,674 had entered Romania, 458,242 had entered Moldova, 577,820 had entered Hungary and 406,833 had entered Slovakia, while 772,121 had entered Russia and 27,108 had entered Belarus. According to Poland's Office for Foreigners, more than 1 million Ukrainian nationals--47% of whom are children--have registered for a national PESEL number, allowing them to access services such as health and social support.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #13

May 5, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 13 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 6,635 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,238 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In addition to widespread conflict in the southeast, Russian attacks have targeted Ukrainian infrastructure throughout the country, in an attempt to thwart efforts from the west to provide Ukrainians with weapons and supplies. Recent missile strikes on railway stations caused damage to the stations, as well as to surrounding infrastructure, but the impact of the attacks is not expected to have a significant impact on the ability to deliver aid.Since the invasion, more than 5.7 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 5, at least 3,119,196 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 854,292 had entered Romania, 450,797 had entered Moldova, 545,311 had entered Hungary and 388,282 had entered Slovakia, while 714,713 had entered Russia and 25,852 had entered Belarus.

Rapid Gender Analysis Ukraine: May Update

May 3, 2022

The lives of people across Ukraine have been profoundly impacted by the humanitarian crisis brought on by the invasion on 24 February 2022. As of 29 April, 5.5 million refugees have already fled Ukraine, and the number of internally displaced people (IDPs) has reached 7.7 million. Of those who have fled the country, it is estimated that 90 per cent are women and children, while most men aged 18–60 are required to stay behind under martial law. Based on current data from the International Organization for Migration, 60 per cent of the adult internally displaced population are female, while 40 per cent are male. As the crisis quickly evolves, so do the needs and priorities of women and men across Ukraine.This Rapid Gender Analysis (RGA), carried out by UN Women and CARE International, seeks to draw attention to the gender dynamics in the humanitarian crisis resulting from the war in Ukraine. The RGA also proposes recommendations for humanitarian leadership, actors and donors to ensure consideration of the gendered dimensions of risk, vulnerability and capabilities in response to this crisis.The RGA is a progressive publication based on both primary and secondary data sources that compares pre-crisis data with up-to-date information as the situation evolves. This RGA builds upon the RGA Ukraine Brief developed by CARE International during the first week of the war and on the UN Women and CARE RGA published 29 March based on an analysis of secondary data. For this report, the RGA team reviewed English, Ukrainian and Russian sources and interviewed 179 women and men from local communities across Ukraine, as well as representatives from civil society organizations (CSOs), UN agencies and government bodies. Particular effort was made to ensure that the voices of women and men in vulnerable situations and from different marginalized groups were included.

Navigating humanitarian dilemmas in the Ukraine crisis

May 3, 2022

The Ukraine crisis presents heightened tensions and dilemmas for humanitarian actors – some familiar, others new. These are informed by a fraught geopolitical context and a rapid series of developments. What are these dilemmas, and what are the five determinants that are likely to play a key role in raising a number of critical questions?This paper presents an introduction to these questions, which all humanitarian actors engaged in the Ukraine crisis will face – and, indeed, have already come up against.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #12

April 28, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 12 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 5,840 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 2,729 killed.Now, two months since the conflict began, 24 million people are estimated to be in need of humanitarian assistance. The most recent needs assessment conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) reveals that one in three Ukrainian households have at least one person with a chronic disease who is unable to easily access healthcare. Such challenges are expected to be exacerbated as the conflict continues.Since the invasion, more than 5.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 28, at least 2,944,164 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 783,420 had entered Romania, 437,362 had entered Moldova, 502,142 had entered Hungary and 360,458 had entered Slovakia, while 627,512 had entered Russia and 24,719 had entered Belarus.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #14

April 22, 2022

The conflict in Ukraine has now displaced 7.1 million Ukrainians to date. The most pressing needs among this population are cash and financial support, transportation, food, shelter, and hygiene items. Many are also in need of medicines and health services. The humanitarian conditions for those who remain in their homes are also severe: Over 1.4 million people are without running water in Eastern Ukraine and an additional 1.6 million across the country are in immediate risk of losing their access. Many others face significant protection, food, and health risks.Project HOPE's support to health facilities and IDPs in Ukraine continues to scale up in response to the overwhelming needs. We are establishing focus on three hubs of support in West Ukraine, East Ukraine, and the Kyiv area with potential expansion to Odessa and Kherson and other areas as security allows.We have also imported more than 150 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.We are also establishing a trauma care training model to roll out to medical professionals on the front lines.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #11

April 21, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the war began, at least 5,264 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 2,345 killed.Nearly two months since the invasion, fighting continues throughout Ukraine, with the heaviest conflicts in the eastern part of the country, in Donetska, Luhanska and Kharkivska oblasts, in both government- and non-governmentcontrolled areas. Last week, the southern city of Mykolaic came under attack. Ukrainians in the affected area have been without access to water since April 17. Attacks have also moved toward western Ukraine, with an attack on April 18 causing 18 civilian casualties in Lviv.The country's Ministry for Reintegration of Ukraine reported the evacuation of more than 4,300 civilians from communities affected by hostilities. Evacuations remain difficult to execute, and many Ukrainians are still hard to reach, as shelling and ongoing conflict have thwarted efforts to safely move people.Since the invasion, more than 5 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 21, at least 2,825,463 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 757,047 had entered Romania, 426,964 had entered Moldova, 471,080 had entered Hungary and 342,813 had entered Slovakia, while 549,805 had entered Russia and 23,759 had entered Belarus. Of refugee arrivals surveyed at border crossings, 89% have been female. 78% of respondents report traveling with children under 18, 11% traveling with elderly persons and 5% traveling with persons with disabilities.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #13

April 15, 2022

Project HOPE continues to scale up operations in Eastern Europe to respond to the ongoing humanitarian crisis. Our teams in Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Ukraine bring technical knowledge on health, mental health, protection, and other sectors with considerable field experience, and a strong relationship with local and international actors to forge a targeted and comprehensive response.This week, more than 7,900 doses of insulin reached Project HOPE's warehouse in Lviv and are now en route to Kharkiv. Project HOPE has imported more than 100 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to six hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.In Moldova, Project HOPE has procured more than 300 wheelchairs to be distributed to a local organization serving Ukrainian refugees. We also continue to support  SAMU's Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) to serve refugees crossing the Ukraine/Moldova border as per the request of the WHO and Moldovan Ministry of Health. The most prevalent diagnoses have included hypertension, upper respiratory infections, and acute mental health issues.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #10

April 14, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the crisis began, at least 4,521 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 1,932 killed, with actual numbers likely much higher.Attacks continue on the cities of Kharkiv and Mariupol, with shelling also reported in Luhansk, Kharkiv, Donetsk and southern Kherson oblasts. The situation in Mariupol remains catastrophic, with 130,000 people still trapped in the city. Though the security situation in northern Ukraine is reportedly improving, 96,000 people across the east are still without electricity, and water has been cut off in Popasna, Rubizhne and Sievierodonetsk. Many people trapped in affected areas face security risks, a lack of information on where to find accommodation and safety, and a lack of basic needs such as food, water and medicines.The State Emergency Service of Ukraine (SESU) reports that nearly half of Ukraine requires de-mining as a result of the invasion. The Department of Pyrotechnic Works and Humanitarian Demining is removing and neutralizing 2,000 to 6,000 explosive devices each day. The mines and other explosive devices, including unexploded ordinance and IEDs left by the Russians, pose a serious risk to civilians and increased need for emergency and traumarelated health supplies.Since the invasion, more than 4.6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 14, at least 2,669,637 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 709,219 had entered Romania, 415,850 had entered Moldova, 434,342 had entered Hungary, 323,020 had entered Slovakia, 433,083 had entered Russia and 21,852 had entered Belarus.

The Long Tail of Afghan Relocation and Resettlement: Achievements, Obstacles, and Opportunities

April 12, 2022

The Evacuate Our Allies (EOA) Coalition was formed in the wake of President Biden's announcement of the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan in April 2021. Its mission is two-fold: to ensure the rapid relocation and rescue of vulnerable Afghans who are at risk of persecution from the Taliban, and to ensure a prompt and dignified resettlement in the United States. Its focus includes, but is not limited to, supporting those eligible for the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program.In addition to its legislative efforts, the EOA Coalition also serves as the primary engagement vehicle for the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Unified Coordination Group (UCG) to work with civil society through Operation Allies Welcome. Through its five main liaison working groups, the coalition has hosted over 20 engagements with dozens of experts and officials representing over 12 federal agencies since September 2021 and has presented hundreds of policy and process recommendations to more humanely, efficiently, and generously support newly arrived Afghans and those that remain abroad in need of protection. This report is a compilation of feedback collected from Afghan American community leaders, veterans groups, on-the-ground experts, and liaison working groups: The report focuses on areas of advancement and achievement in our partnership with the UCG and federal agencies, identifies challenges that prevent successful relocation and resettlement, and presents recommendations for policy changes that should be prioritized as Operation Allies Welcome enters its next phase.