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Pandemic Relief & Recovery: Emergency Funding & The Bay Area Arts Community

October 1, 2021

An analysis of the COVID-19 relief support grantmakers provided to Bay Area artists and cultural organizations, how it helped mitigate the crisis, and what the regional arts community needs now to recover.

Analysis to Inform Philanthropic Investment in Children's Mental Health

January 1, 2018

In March 2017, on behalf of the Zellerbach Family Foundation, i.e. communications organized a convening of statewide funders, advocates, and providers to discuss how to move California forward in meeting the mental health needs of California's most vulnerable youth. i.e. also created a literature/research review in collaboration with meeting participants, as well as a meeting summary. This evaluation report intends to provide an inventory and better understanding of organizations currently working to improve children's mental health in California, and to inform more coordinated and strategic investments in this area.

CalYOUTH Survey of Young Adults' Child Welfare Workers

May 13, 2016

This report presents the results of the CalYOUTH Survey of Young Adults' Child Welfare Workers, a survey of case workers supervising youth in extended foster care who are participating in the CalYOUTH Youth Survey. The report shares the county child welfare workers' views on how these young people are faring with the transition to adulthood, as well as their preparedness and service needs in a wide range of areas. The report also shares workers' perceptions of the availability and helpfulness of services within their county, their perceptions of court personnel's supportiveness of extended care, their satisfaction with collaboration with other systems of potential support for youth, and their views of challenges to effective implementation of extended foster care in California. The survey results highlight areas of progress and opportunities for continued improvement as California continues its development of foster care for young adults.

Findings from the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH): Conditions of Youth at Age 19

May 9, 2016

The "CalYOUTH Wave 2 Youth Survey", conducted when the young people participating in CalYOUTH were 19 years old, follows up on a survey of the same young people when they were approaching the age of majority in California's foster care system. More than 80 percent of the youth who took part in the baseline interviews participated in the Wave 2 survey. The report provides the most comprehensive view to date of young adults making the transition to adulthood from foster care in California, highlighting differences between young people participating in extended foster care and young people who had left care. The report provides feedback for all parties interested in improving youth's transitions from foster care to adulthood.

Active Citizens, Stronger Communities: Helping Lawful Permanent Residents Become Citizens

September 9, 2013

This resource explains the process and barriers to citizenship and discusses how local officials can support the naturalization process in a way that creates better community engagement. California is home to about 2.5 million "lawful permanent residents" who are eligible to become citizens.

Providing Foster Care for Young Adults: Early Implementation of California's Fostering Connections Act

April 29, 2013

This report examines the planning process for implementing California's Fostering Connections to Success Act, as well as the new law's early implementation. It is based on data collected from in-depth interviews with key informants who played a critical role in passage of the law, in implementation planning, or in early implementation at the county and state level and from focus groups with young people who stood to benefit directly from the legislation. Although extended foster care is likely to look different in different states, California's experience offers many lessons from which other states might learn.

SFCIPP - From Rights to Realities

January 1, 2012

The San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership works to improve the lives of children of incarcerated parents by increasing awareness of their needs, strengths and rights both within the public systems that most affect them and among the broader public. This ten-year anniversary report presents an overview of SFCIPP's efforts, examining changes in systems, policies and practices, and addressing the needs of children with incarcerated parents.

Collaborative Strategies for Day Labor Centers

September 16, 2011

This guide is designed to assist local officials, immigrant serving organizations, day labor center planners and leadership, and others to understand how collaborative relationships and partnerships can help communities to effectively establish, support and sustain day labor centers.

ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

February 28, 2011

This is the final performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. Over three years from 2008 to 2010, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 63 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

September 30, 2010

This is the third of three performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residences emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2009-2010 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 18 classrooms from four schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Just the Financial Facts Please! A Secret Survey of Financial Services in San Francisco's Mission District

September 1, 2010

Examines the costs and dynamics of borrowing $1,000 from various financial service providers in a historic immigrant community. Proposes Financial Facts labels and a Responsible Lending and Borrowing Checklist to increase residents' financial capability.

Child and Youth Emergency Mental Health Care: A National Problem

July 1, 2008

Analyzes the increased use of emergency mental health care by children and youth, and the challenges and concerns this trend implies for access to adequate care. Recommends policy actions to improve emergency care and promote community-based services.