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US Sustainable, Responsible and Impact Investing Trends 2016

November 3, 2016

US sustainable, responsible and impact (SRI) investing continues to expand. The total US-domiciled assets under management using SRI strategies grew from $6.57 trillion at the start of 2014 to $8.72 trillion at the start of 2016, an increase of 33 percent, as shown in Figure A. These assets now account for more than one out of every five dollars under professional management in the United States.The individuals, institutions, investment companies, money managers and financial institutions that practice SRI investing seek to achieve long-term competitive financial returns. Some investors embrace SRI strategies to manage risk and fulfill fiduciary duties; many also seek to help contribute to advancements in social, environmental and governance practices. SRI investing strategies can be applied across asset classes to promote stronger corporate social responsibility, build long-term value for companies and their stakeholders, and foster businesses or introduce products that will yield community and environmental benefits.Through a survey and research undertaken in 2016, the US SIF Foundation identified:* $8.10 trillion in US-domiciled assets at the beginning of 2016 held by 477 institutional investors, 300 money managers and 1,043 community investment institutions that apply various environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria in their investment analysis and portfolio selection, and* $2.56 trillion in US-domiciled assets at the beginning of 2016 held by 225 institutional investors or money managers that filed or co-filed shareholder resolutions on ESG issues at publicly traded companies from 2014 through 2016. After eliminating double counting for assets involved in both strategies and for assets managed by money managers on behalf of institutional investors, the overall total of SRI assets at the beginning of 2016 was $8.72 trillion, as shown in Figure C. Throughout this report, the terms sustainable, responsible and impact investing, sustainable investing, responsible investing, impact investing and SRI are used interchangeably to describe these investment practices.After eliminating double counting for assets involved in both strategies and for assets managed by money managers on behalf of institutional investors, the overall total of SRI assets at the beginning of 2016 was $8.72 trillion. Throughout this report, the terms sustainable, responsible and impact investing, sustainable investing, responsible investing, impact investing and SRI are used interchangeably to describe these investment practices.The assets engaged in sustainable, responsible and impact investing practices at the start of 2016 represent nearly 22 percent of the $40.3 trillion in total assets under management tracked by Cerulli Associates. From 1995, when the US SIF Foundation first measured the size of the US sustainable and responsible investing market, to 2016, the SRI universe has increased nearly 14-fold, a compound annual growth rate of 13.25 percent.

Restoring Voter Choice: How Citizen-Led Redistricting Can End the Manipulation of Our Elections

October 26, 2016

This report examines the 2016 primary and general elections for Congress and state legislatures. It concludes that voters in a shocking number of campaigns have been left without choices at the polls this year. In states where legislators drew maps, voters have fewer choices than in states where maps were drawn by individuals with no personal stake in the outcome. And when voters have real choices on Election Day, our democracy is strengthened because citizens can hold elected officials accountable.

Climate Justice and Women's Rights: A Guide to Supporting Grassroots Women's Action

March 19, 2015

This Guide emerged from a "Summit on Women and Climate" in Bali, Indonesia, and aims to increase timely and appropriate funding for worldwide climate action initiatives led by women and their communities. The Guide is not a comprehensive resource on climate change or women's rights. Instead, it addresses an urgent need within the funding community and offers concrete, practical guidance that: Orients grantmakers to the importance of funding at the intersection of climate justice and women's rights.Draws lessons from specific examples of funding for women's climate change initiatives.Provides guidance on how funders can collaborate to direct timely and appropriate funding to women and their communities.Advocates for bringing women's voices into climate change policy discussions.Highlights the strong impact that small (less than $10,000) to medium-sized ($10,000-$50,000) grants can make in women-organized efforts to address climate change at the community level, across geographic boundaries and in global climate policy. Grassroots women's climate activism is becoming increasingly critical to women's collective and individual rights, freedom and survival.

Justicia Climática y Derechos de las Mujeres: Una Guía para Apoyar la Acción Comunitaria de Mujeres

March 19, 2015

This Guide emerged from a "Summit on Women and Climate" in Bali, Indonesia, and aims to increase timely and appropriate funding for worldwide climate action initiatives led by women and their communities. The Guide is not a comprehensive resource on climate change or women's rights. Instead, it addresses an urgent need within the funding community and offers concrete, practical guidance that:Orients grantmakers to the importance of funding at the intersection of climate justice and women's rights.Draws lessons from specific examples of funding for women's climate change initiatives.Provides guidance on how funders can collaborate to direct timely and appropriate funding to women and their communities.Advocates for bringing women's voices into climate change policy discussions.Highlights the strong impact that small (less than $10,000) to medium-sized ($10,000-$50,000) grants can make in women-organized efforts to address climate change at the community level, across geographic boundaries and in global climate policy. Grassroots women's climate activism is becoming increasingly critical to women's collective and individual rights, freedom and survival.

The New Politics of Judicial Elections 2009-10

October 31, 2011

Examines trends in the impact of special interest groups' spending on judicial elections, TV advertising, and implications such as threats of impeachment for unpopular decisions, attacks on merit selection systems, and danger to public election financing.

Voting Law Changes in 2012

October 3, 2011

Analyzes trends in state legislation that make voter registration and voting difficult, including requiring proof of citizenship, eliminating same-day registration, restricting early and absentee voting, and stricter rules for restoring voting rights.

Green Revolving Funds in Action: California Institute of Technology

July 25, 2011

Presents a case study of the California Institute of Technology's use of green revolving funds to finance energy efficiency upgrades. Outlines the GRF's incorporation into an existing endowment fund, operations, and performance as well as lessons learned.

Financial Risks of Investments in Coal

June 15, 2011

Analyzes the regulatory, commodity, and construction risks of investing in coal mining and coal-fired power plants. Examines industry analysts' consensus on viable alternatives to coal, including natural gas, solar, wind, and energy efficiency.

Small Donor Matching Funds

September 17, 2010

Outlines New York City's small donor multiple match public financing as a model for reform and its effect on the democratization of campaign fundraising, including the number and impact of small donors, voter outreach, competition, and candidate pools.

Justice Denied: America's Continuing Neglect of Our Constitutional Right to Counsel

April 30, 2009

Presents the legal foundation, requirements, and relevance of the right to counsel; the states of indigent defense and the need for reform; and lessons learned from and recommendations for using litigation, legislation, and commissions to achieve reform.

The Changing Racial Dynamics of the War on Drugs

April 14, 2009

Examines the decrease in African Americans and increase in whites among those in state prisons for drug offenses and discusses possible factors, including trends in drug use, sales, arrests, drug courts, and sentencing policies. Considers implications.

Drug Courts: A Review of the Evidence

April 2, 2009

Provides an overview of drug courts designed to integrate drug treatment into the criminal justice system in cases of low-level defendants and reviews research on their operation, efficacy, and concerns about its impact on the prison population.