Clear all

11 results found

reorder grid_view

Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Evaluation

December 9, 2015

This report documents the outcomes of veterans served by the Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration program (VHPD), one element of the Obama administration's signature initiative to end veteran homelessness. It describes the housing, employment, and health of veterans before they entered VHPD and 6 months after leaving the program. It discusses the lessons learned through VHPD, strongly emphasizing how important it is to reach out to veterans in ways that appeal to them (including peer-to-peer outreach and having veterans on staff) and the benefits of bringing together housing assistance, case management, and employment services.

Emergency Preparedness Coordinator: User Guide

October 12, 2015

A disaster can strike anytime, anywhere. When it does, a poorly-managed response can put the safety and well-being of residents at risk and expose housing owners to unnecessary costs, problems and liabilities. Having the right plan in place before a disaster will help you manage an effective, coordinated response across staff, departments, partner agencies and sites.The Ready to Respond: Disaster Staffing Toolkit will help your organization prepare for and respond to a disaster. The Toolkit is based on the Incident Command System (ICS), a planning framework used by federal, state and local first responder agencies to help structure the command, control and coordination of emergency response. It includes guidance on staff roles and responsibilities and the disaster-related protocols and systems which will enable you to mount an effective emergency response.The Toolkit is designed to support three vital goals—building protection, resident engagement and business continuity. This will allow your organization to minimize building damage and ensure quick return to service; support the safety, preparedness and recovery of your residents, and maintain key business operations throughout a disaster.

Food Systems Assessment Report

July 29, 2014

This report was produced by ASAP (Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project) with CEFS (Center for Environmental Farming Systems) and CFSA (Carolina Farm Stewardship Association) to inform the food systems development work of the CONNECT Our Future project in Charlotte, North Carolina, and 14 surrounding counties: Anson, Cabarrus, Cleveland, Gaston, Iredell, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, Rowan, Stanly, and Union counties in North Carolina, and Chester, Lancaster, Union, and York counties in South Carolina. (These counties will be referred to throughout this report as the "CONNECT Our Future project region" or "project region.") This report documents current food and farm conditions, raises awareness of local food system opportunities emerging in the project region, and contributes to the CONNECT Our Future goal to develop a blueprint for regionally directed economic growth. The Food Systems Assessment Report summarizes major findings from the assessment research and discusses key opportunities and actions for the region based on these findings. The research conducted for this report included a thorough inventory of existing food production and consumption data by county, as well as investigations into regional food system assets including infrastructure, markets, accessibility, and the food waste stream. The Food Systems Assessment Report also identifies the significant data indicators for local food systems throughout the CONNECT Our Future project region and can be used as a resource for the region's communities to conduct their own assessments based on community-specific needs.

Granite State Future: Regional Themes

April 5, 2013

This executive summary provides an overview of the process and results of an extended public engagement process conducted by New Hampshire Listens of the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire and the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, on behalf of the nine Regional Planning Commissions (RPCs) in New Hampshire. The work was carried out under contract with the Nashua RPC, using Sustainable Communities RegionalPlanning Grant funds administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The primary purpose of the public engagement process was to elicit a wide range of views from diverse residents of New Hampshire, representing all geographic regions of the state, to the question: How can we make our community the best place to live, learn, work, and play?

Seeking A Sustainable Journey to Work: Findings from the National Bridges to Work Demonstration

July 11, 2005

The Bridges to Work demonstration was designed to test whether efforts to help inner-city job seekers overcome barriers to accessing suburban jobs would result in better employment opportunities and earnings for these workers. This report examines outcomes for more than 1,800 applicants to Bridges to Work, half of whom were randomly selected to receive the programs transportation, job placement and supportive services for up to 18 months and half who were not offered these services. The researchers found that Bridges to Work did not positively impact participants employment and earnings, results that were consistent across cities and across various strategies for providing transportation services. Given the programs implementation challenges, costs and lack of results, the report concludes that the Bridges model is not a viable policy response to the mismatch between the location of jobs and the location of unemployed workers. However, the models lack of success does not diminish the importance of improving transportation options to increase workers access to employment, and the authors derive a number of important lessons from the demonstrations experience to inform future mobility efforts.

How Are HOPE VI Families Faring? Health

October 7, 2004

While the primary goal of the HOPE VI program is to improve the living environment of public housing residents, it also aims to help residents move toward self-sufficiency by helping them find new or better jobs (see page 6). The program's Community Support Services (CSS) component can help identify what residents need, such as job training or placement, to make them more likely to find employment. Relocation itself might help residents find employment if they move to less poor neighborhoods with more job opportunities and better job information networks. Residents who move back to new mixed-income developments on the HOPE VI sites could experience similar improved job networks. However, whether these expectations of increased employment and self-sufficiency are realistic for HOPE VI residents is unclear. For both employed and nonemployed residents, the gap between household income and the income needed for housing and other costs of living is wide. The HOPE VI Panel Study is tracking the well-being of residents from five HOPE VI sites (see page 7). These respondents, mostly African American women, were extremely poor at baseline.[1] The vast majority reported household incomes below the poverty level, and over a third (35 percent) reported annual incomes of less than $5,000. Less than half (45 percent) of respondents were employed, and those who were working earned low wages (Popkin et al. 2002). This brief discusses income and employment findings for working-age adults under 62 years old two years after relocation started at the five HOPE VI Panel Study sites.[2] It examines various barriers to employment for respondents, and considers both expectations for future employment and the services and support systems that might best mitigate those barriers. Future research will examine how residents' employment experiences are affected as relocation is completed and some residents return to the revitalized developments. Brief #4 from the series "Metropolitan Housing and Communities: A Roof Over Their Heads".Notes from this section1. Because many health problems vary significantly by gender and race, and because over 90 percent of the adults in the HOPE VI Panel Study are women and 89 percent are African American, a sample of black women nationally is used as the comparison group. The national data cited in this brief are published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, calculated from the National Health Interview Survey in 2001.National Health Interview Survey data are broken down by sex and race, but not further by poverty status. Nationally, approximately one-third of all black women live in households with incomes below the poverty level. Therefore, the comparison data are biased slightly upward in terms of better health because of the relatively better economic well-being of the national population of black women compared to the HOPE VI sample. Even limiting the comparisons to similar gender, race, and age groups, adults in the HOPE VI study experience health problems more often than other demographically similar groups.

How Are HOPE VI Families Faring? Income and Employment

October 7, 2004

While the primary goal of the HOPE VI program is to improve the living environment of public housing residents, it also aims to help residents move toward self-sufficiency by helping them find new or better jobs (see page 6). The program's Community Support Services (CSS) component can help identify what residents need, such as job training or placement, to make them more likely to find employment. Relocation itself might help residents find employment if they move to less poor neighborhoods with more job opportunities and better job information networks. Residents who move back to new mixed-income developments on the HOPE VI sites could experience similar improved job networks. However, whether these expectations of increased employment and self-sufficiency are realistic for HOPE VI residents is unclear. For both employed and nonemployed residents, the gap between household income and the income needed for housing and other costs of living is wide. The HOPE VI Panel Study is tracking the well-being of residents from five HOPE VI sites (see page 7). These respondents, mostly African American women, were extremely poor at baseline.[1] The vast majority reported household incomes below the poverty level, and over a third (35 percent) reported annual incomes of less than $5,000. Less than half (45 percent) of respondents were employed, and those who were working earned low wages (Popkin et al. 2002). This brief discusses income and employment findings for working-age adults under 62 years old two years after relocation started at the five HOPE VI Panel Study sites.[2] It examines various barriers to employment for respondents, and considers both expectations for future employment and the services and support systems that might best mitigate those barriers. Future research will examine how residents' employment experiences are affected as relocation is completed and some residents return to the revitalized developments. Notes from this section 1. Among respondents under 62 years old, 82 percent were non-Hispanic African American women and 9 percent were Hispanic women. 2. A future brief in the "A Roof Over Their Heads" series will examine income and employment findings for adults over 62 years old.

Facing Homelessness: A Study of Homelessness in Chicago and the Suburbs

December 16, 2002

The Regional Roundtable on Homelessness (Regional Roundtable) is a forum that works toimprove strategies for understanding and addressing homelessness throughout northeastern Illinois. Within this forum, local governmental administrators and funders share the challenges of assessing and planning for the needs of people who are homeless within their communities, and of understanding and addressing homelessness. Specifically, the Regional Roundtable discusses best practices, funding opportunities, strategies, and undertakes projects to improve the Continuum of Care process within each jurisdiction and across the region.

In the Driver's Seat

April 30, 2001

In the mid-1990s, P/PV launched the Bridges to Work demonstration to test the idea that improved access to suburban jobs might benefit low-income urban residents. The project sought to measure the impact of reverse-commuting initiatives in five major cities: Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Milwaukee and St. Louis. While the project was carefully planned, program staff still faced numerous unforeseen events that required program directors to adapt the design to meet local needs, impediments, and opportunities, while maintaining the quality of the original design. In the Drivers Seat examines the experiences of five project directors and their ability to address the challenges that arose, including discrimination in the workplace, ethical issues with random assignment, and difficulties in recruitment and placement.

Overcoming Roadblocks on the Way to Work: Bridges to Work Field Report

June 12, 1999

While many low-income, inner-city job seekers are isolated from economic opportunities in the suburbs, transportation alone is unlikely to improve their employment prospects, according to the authors of this report. Based on the lessons of P/PV's $17 million five-city Bridges to Work demonstration, the report indicates that while transportation was certainly critical, much of the sites' success depended more on their ability to recruit, prepare and support job seekers, the essential components of any workforce development program.

Getting from Here to There: The Bridges to Work Demonstration First Report to the Field

March 2, 1997

In response to the increase in inner-city joblessness and the growing suburbanization of employment in the early 1990s, P/PV's developed the Bridges to Work initiative. Bridges provided transportation to allow inner-city residents to reach suburban jobs while also offering limited support services aimed at mitigating problems created or exacerbated by the longer daily commutes. This report examines the challenges and achievements pilot sites experienced in trying to build partnerships between cities and suburbs agencies during the planning and implementation phases.