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Achieving Behavioral Health Care Integration in Rural America

May 25, 2023

Integrating primary care services and treatment for mental health and substance use conditions not only enhances patients' access to needed care but also improves health outcomes in a cost-effective way. Yet the barriers to integrated care are substantial, and it is even more difficult to achieve in rural and frontier communities, which are home to 1 in 7 Americans.Our current work focuses on breaking down the barriers to integration in rural America, where the health care infrastructure and provider composition vary in distinct ways from urban and suburban areas. Americans in rural areas face significant shortages of psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, and other behavioral health specialists. More than 60% of nonmetropolitan counties lack a psychiatrist, and almost half of nonmetropolitan counties do not have a psychologist, compared with 27% and 19% of urban counties, respectively. These gaps in specialty care force rural residents to rely heavily on primary providers for much of their care.

Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy 2020: Data to Drive Decisions

November 12, 2020

Each year, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy and Candid analyze global disaster-related funding from foundations, bilateral and multilateral donors, U.S. government agencies, corporations, and donations through donor-advised funds and online platforms. We analyze this funding according to a taxonomy that classifies giving by type of disaster and disaster assistance strategy. Philanthropic funding for disasters and humanitarian crises is situated within a large ecosystem of global aid. While assistance from governments far surpasses funding from foundations, institutional philanthropy still plays an important role. For example, foundations can choose to fill funding gaps and support underfunded areas of the disaster life cycle. Support for disaster risk reduction and preparedness can mitigate the impact of disasters, and many communities need sustained funding for the long road to recovery. We hope this analysis will aid donors in considering how to maximize the impact of their disaster-related giving. 

Financing Project ECHO: Options for State Medicaid Programs

September 20, 2017

Project ECHO, a unique model for expanding access to specialty health care services, can bolster state Medicaid program efforts to improve care in underserved areas. With a handful of states using Medicaid funds to support Project ECHO, more states are interested in pursuing ECHO models to enhance services for at-risk populations.This brief outlines an array of financing options, including approaches currently in use as well as new options, and highlights how four states — California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Oregon — leveraged Medicaid support for ECHO. It outlines design considerations for specific delivery system environments as well as broad considerations for long-term sustainability of Project ECHO approaches. The brief was developed by the Center for Health Care Strategies as part of the Project ECHO Medicaid Learning Collaborative, a multi-state learning collaborative to promote long-term Medicaid policy and financing strategies for Project ECHO in states across the country.

Comprehensive Capacity Building to Strengthen Regional Marine Conservation Efforts

June 2, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, examines what a group of marine conservation funders did when questions about grantee capacity came up. It shares the David and Lucile Packard Foundation's perspective on how it joined forces with four other funders— the Marisla Foundation, Sandler Family Foundation, Walton Family Foundation, and The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust—to create the Pescadero Program, a fiveyear, comprehensive capacity building program for marine conservation NGOs in Northwest Mexico.

A Human Touch to Ocean Funding

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the Helmsley Charitable Trust took a humanistic approach in their due diligence processes with grantees in Madagascar. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees, Blue Ventures, and how they worked together locally to establish a campaign to rebuild tropical fishing communities in Madagascar while sustainaing natural resources and biodiversity.

Flipping the Fishing Business Model on its Head

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, encouraged collaboration in U.S. West Coast groundfish fishing communities. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees in the area, The Nature Conservancy, and how they worked together locally to address declining groundfish populations and improve the livelihoods of local fishermen.

Embedding Ocean Conservation into California's DNA

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how The Campbell Foundation, a supporter of marine conservation in California, helped implement a state law calling for the creation of marine protected areas in the state. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees helping with this initiative, the Resources Legacy Fund, and how they worked together with other foundations and grantees to enact and implement California's Marine Life Protection Act.

Making Sustainable Seafood Also Good for Business

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the Walton Family Foundation, isusing a systems approach to make the seafood business more sustainable. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees in the area, the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership, and how they worked together with industry and private partners to create a tipping point in the business practices of fisheries producing seafood commodity products.

Democratizing Philanthropy Using Technology

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the SunLight Time Foundation is transforming worldwide marine conservation efforts through communications and data access. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees in the area, Marine Watch International, and how they're working to leverage technology as a means to level the ocean conservation funding field.

Saving the Vaquita from Imminent Extinction

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the Marisla Foundation stepped outside of its traditional grantmaking role to help save the vaquita from extinction. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees in the area, World Wildlife Fund Mexico, and how they worked together to change fishing regulations and behaviours in the Gulf of Mexico to protect the species from further decline. 

Making the Political Win to Save Bristol Bay Permanent

March 31, 2017

This GrantCraft case study, developed for Foundation Center's FundingtheOcean.org portal, explores how the Oak Foundation, a supporter of marine conservation in Alaska, responded when national policy lifted protections from Bristol Bay. It includes the perspective of one of it's grantees in the area, the Alaska Marine Conservation Council, and how they worked together locally to establish a campaign to continue protecting Bristol Bay.

The Transfer Playbook: Essential Practices For Two- And Four-year Colleges

May 17, 2016

Recognizing the critical need to help millions of community college students failed by current transfer practices and policies.  A new report provides a detailed guide for two- and four-year colleges on how to improve bachelor's degree outcomes for students who start at community college.Every year, millions of students aiming to attain a bachelor's degree attend community colleges because of their affordability and accessibility. Most will not realize their goals. While the vast majority of students report they want to earn a bachelor's degree, only 14 percent of degree-seeking students achieve that goal within six years, according to recent research from CCRC, Aspen, and the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. The odds are worse for low-income students, first-generation college students, and students of color—those most likely to start at a community college.