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Ending Street Homelessness in Vanguard Cities Across the Globe: An International Comparative Study

April 5, 2022

Street homelessness is one of the most extreme, and visible, manifestations of profound injustice on the planet, but often struggles to achieve priority attention at international level. The Institute of Global Homelessness (IGH's) A Place to Call Home initiative, launched in 2017, represented a concerted effort to support cities across the globe to eradicate street homelessness. A first cohort of 13 'Vanguard Cities' committed to a specific target on ending or reducing street homelessness by December 2020. Our independent evaluation of this initiative found that:Two Vanguard Cities – Glasgow and Sydney – fully met their self-defined target reductions for end 2020. In addition, Greater Manchester, while it did not meet its exceptionally ambitious goal of 'ending all rough sleeping', recorded an impressive 52% reduction against baseline.Overall, there was evidence of reductions in targeted aspects of street homelessness in over half of the Vanguard Cities. In most of the remaining cities data limitations, sometimes as a result of COVID, meant that it was not possible to determine trends. In only one Vanguard City – Edmonton – was there an evidenced increase in street homelessness over baseline levels.Key enablers of progress in reducing street homelessness included the presence of a lead coordinating agency, and coordinated entry to homelessness services, alongside investment in specialized and evidence-based interventions, such as assertive street outreach services, individual case management and Housing First.Key barriers to progress included heavy reliance on undignified and sometimes unsafe communal shelters, a preoccupation with meeting immediate physiological needs, and sometimes perceived spiritual needs, rather than structural and system change, and a lack of emphasis on prevention. Aggressive enforcement interventions by police and city authorities, and documentary and identification barriers, were also counter-productive to attempts to reduce street homelessness.A key contextual variable between the Vanguard Cities was political will, with success in driving down street homelessness associated with high-level political commitments. An absolute lack of funds was a major challenge in all of the Global South cities, but also in resource-poor settings in the Global North. Almost all Vanguard Cities cited pressures on the affordable housing stock as a key barrier to progress, but local lettings and other policies could make a real difference.The impact of the COVID-19 crisis differed markedly across the Vanguard Cities, with people at risk of street homelessness most effectively protected in the UK and Australian cities. Responses were less inclusive and ambitious in the North American and Global South cities, with more continued use of 'shared air' shelters, albeit that in some of these contexts the pandemic prompted better coordination of local efforts to address street homelessness.IGH involvement was viewed as instrumental in enhancing the local profile, momentum and level of ambition attached to reducing street homelessness in the Vanguard Cities. IGH's added value to future cohorts of cities could be maximised via a focus on more tailored forms of support specific to the needs of each city, and also to different types of stakeholders, particularly frontline workers.

Untapped Opportunities for Climate Action: An Assessment of Food Systems in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)

March 22, 2022

A summary report providing a synthesis of the 14 country assessments with recommendations and priority actions.

Environmental Funding by European Foundations: Volume 5

April 1, 2021

This report is the most comprehensive study to date into support for environmental initiatives provided by European philanthropic foundations. It builds on the four earlier editions, increasing the number of foundations and grants being analysed, along with the total value of these grants.This 5th edition features a detailed analysis of the environmental grants of 127 European public-benefit foundations, who provided 5358 grants in 2018, worth a combined total of €745.6 million. These 127 foundations include many of Europe's largest providers of philanthropic grants for environmental initiatives.

New perspectives on an old fishing practice: Scale, context and impacts of bottom trawling

March 1, 2021

This report seeks to provide new perspectives on this historical controversy by presenting the most up-todate synthesis of available data and evidence on bottom trawling's extent, impacts, and solutions in order to inform constructive policy-making. Specifically, it uses novel data analysis from Sea Around Us to map the global extent of bottom trawling; a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature to elucidate environmental, social, and climate impacts; and insights from more than 40 global experts on what a constructive future might look like that manages or severely. limits the worst impacts of this practice, while also ensuring a just and equitable society and a healthy food system.

2017/2018 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities

June 22, 2020

We are pleased to present The 2017–2018 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, a comprehensive report on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report documents data on 19,764 grants awarded by 800 foundations, intermediary NGOs, and corporations and by 15 donor government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2017–2018. The report provides detailed data on the distribution of LGBTI funding by geography, issue, strategy, and population focus, offering a tool for identifying trends, gaps, and opportunities in the rapidly changing landscape of LGBTI funding.The 2017–2018 Global Resources Report builds on two previous editions, which focused on grantmaking in the calendar years 2013–2014 and 2015–16. With this third edition, we have now documented comprehensive data through six calendar years of grantmaking, allowing us to conduct a deeper analysis of LGBTI funding trend lines over time. In many sections of this report, we offer a comparison with the previous report documenting 2015–16, and in some key places we share analysis across the full six-year period.This third report represents a continuing and evolving collaboration between two philanthropic networks, Global Philanthropy Project and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. The trust developed between these networks has enabled us to adjust the report development process over time as we identify opportunities to activate the unique competencies and assets of both networks. In this iteration of the process, Global Philanthropy Project coordinated development and analysis of the data from foundations and corporations based outside of the United States (U.S.) and from all government and multilateral institutions. Funders for LGBTQ Issues coordinated development and analysis of the data from foundations and corporations based in the U.S., and provided generous overall guidance based on more than a decade of experience producing the comprehensive annual U.S. domestic tracking report on LGBTQI funding.

Data Protection, Immigration Enforcement and Fundamental Rights: What the EU's Regulations on Interoperability Mean for People with Irregular Status

November 18, 2019

This report was written by Chris Jones, Researcher at Statewatch, as a background document for a legal seminar organised on 14-15 November 2019 in Brussels by PICUM, the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) and European Migration Law.It examines the EU's justice and home affairs databases and information systems, the changes that have been introduced by recent legislation seeking to make those systems 'interoperable' and the potential implications of those changes for fundamental rights, in particular in relation to undocumented migrants.

Building at the Crossroads of Royale and Treurenberg

November 6, 2019

30 years. 30 contributors. 30 takes on the future of philanthropy.With so many complex and urgent challenges facing contemporary society, clearly treading water isn't enough. How can philanthropy adapt to tackle these challenges head on? How can the EFC be the catalyst in this process?The answers to these questions are going to be critical.This commemorative book, marking 30 years since the establishment of the European Foundation Centre, turns to some of the most influential thought leaders on philanthropy from around the world to have their say on the future of the EFC and the wider philanthropic sector.

Using harmonized historical catch data to infer the expansion of global tuna fisheries

September 13, 2019

Despite worldwide demand for tuna products and considerable conservation interest by civil society, no single global dataset exists capturing the spatial extent of all catches from fisheries for large pelagic species across all ocean basins. Efforts to spatially quantify the historical catch of global tuna fisheries have been restricted to the few taxa of major economic interest, creating a truncated view of the true extent of the fisheries for tuna and other large pelagic fishes. Individual Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) have given varying degrees of attention to minor taxa and non-target species only in more recent years. Here, we compiled and harmonized public datasets of nominal landed catches, as well as spatial data on reported catches of large pelagic taxa reported for the industrial tuna and large pelagic fisheries by tuna RFMOs for the last 60+ years. Furthermore, we provide a preliminary estimate of marine finfishes discarded by these fisheries. We spatialized these data to create a publicly available, comprehensive dataset presenting the historical reported landed catches plus preliminary discards of these species in space for 1950–2016. Our findings suggest that current public reporting efforts are insufficient to fully and transparently document the global historical extent of fisheries for tuna and other large pelagic fishes. Further harmonization of our findings with data from small-scale tuna fisheries could contribute to a fuller picture of global tuna and large pelagic fisheries.

On the Creeping Increase of Vessels’ Fishing Power

September 1, 2019

This contribution presents a synthesis, via a semilogarithmic regression, of estimates of the slow increase of technological efficiency, or "creep factor," as estimated by various authors for a number of demersal and pelagic fisheries. This factor is used in fisheries science to adjust for the gradual increase in the effectiveness of fishing gear resulting from the successive introduction of technological improvement to fishing gear and vessels. Altogether, 51 estimates of this creep factor, mostly around 2–4%/yr and covering periods from 4 to 129 yr, were assembled or newly calculated from secondary data and shown to decrease as the period covered increased. This finding is compatible with the hypothesis that creep factors are usually estimated and published to correct for the introduction of an effective new technology over a short period of time. We suggest that estimates obtained in this fashion cannot be applied to long-term analyses and propose instead our empirical relationship, derived from estimates of creep factor and the number of years covered in a study. Also, our study confirms that technology creep must be included in all analyses involving time series of fishing effort, particularly if they exceed one decade in temporal coverage.Key words: effectiveness of fishing gear; fishing power; technological efficiency; technology creep factor

Re-Claiming the Narrative for Social Change : Mapping a Philanthropic Response

March 1, 2019

This report provides the results of a broad stroke mapping of initiatives supported by various European and American philanthropic bodies. These initiatives aim to leverage the power of strategic communications, and in particular, effective narratives, to counter the closing of civic space and to achieve positive social change. It is intended as a real-time snapshot of ideas and approaches to capture what is being done and where, identify gaps, and share learning on new pathways and solutions for narrative change. The mapping includes some initiatives that fall outside the philanthropic community but which have potential for further exploration and/or adoption.

Environmental Funding by European Foundations: Volume 4

March 1, 2019

This report is the most comprehensive study to date into support for environmental initiatives provided by European philanthropic foundations. It builds on the three earlier editions, increasing the number of foundations and grants being analysed, along with the total value of these grants.This 4th edition features a detailed analysis of the environmental grants of 87 European public-benefit foundations, as compared to 75 in the previous edition. These 87 foundations include many of Europe's largest providers of philanthropic grants for environmental initiatives.

2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities

April 24, 2018

Funders for LGBTQ Issues and Global Philanthropy Project are pleased to share with you The 2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, the most comprehensive report to date on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report captures data on 12,964 grants awarded by 511 foundations, intermediaries, and corporations and by 15 government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2015-2016. It builds upon the first edition of the Global Resources Report, which was released two years ago and focused on grantmaking in the calendar years 2013-2014. With this second volume, we now have comprehensive data on four calendar years of grantmaking, allowing us to conduct a deeper analysis of the trendlines for LGBTI funding over time. In several sections of this report, we offer not only a snapshot of funding for 2015-2016, but also an analysis of how funding has shifted over a four-year period.