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Advancing Economic Justice for People with Disabilities

May 25, 2023

More than 41 million people in the United States (12.7% of the population) have disabilities that affect their ability to work or engage in major life activities. Helping this population achieve economic security, build assets, and achieve economic mobility—by removing systemic barriers, shifting discriminatory attitudes, and providing needed tools—is a core part of an economic justice agenda.

Laal (2019-2020 Annual Report)

September 9, 2020

In the same spirit of striving for change within one's community, Laal conducted a thorough needs-based assessment in Norwood, from March to August of 2019, where we surveyed 200 Bangladeshi and South Asian womxn. These surveys asked qualitative and quantitative questions to determine what resources the community needed and what the most prominent problems facing the community were. These surveys were also imperative in establishing a rapport with the local community members and laying a foundation within a community that has historically been overlooked and underserved for over 30 years. Through programming and resources, Laal aims to create an active community of womxn who can empower themselves and one another through direct action and deliberative dialogue. Historically, immigrant Bangladeshi womxn in New York City have lacked the necessary space and resources to learn English, obtain a job, or vote because they have been treated as second-class citizens-- culturally, systematically, and institutionally. Laal is eradicating a stigma that has been culturally, traditionally, and religiously interwoven into this community's foundation; in following Septima Clark's legacy, we too, believe that Bangladeshi womxn will find liberation through literacy. 

The Status of Women in the South

February 24, 2016

The southern United States is a dynamic and influential region marked by innovation and economic opportunities for women, yet also a region where inequalities persist and many women -- especially women of color and those who are immigrants -- face challenges such as high unemployment, a large gender wage gap, abuse of their reproductive rights, and low levels of political representation. This complex picture of the South as a region where both opportunities and disparities exist is often lost by those who either romanticize the South's positive qualities or exaggerate its negative aspects. Between these two views of the southern United States -- both of which are at least partially based in reality -- this report relies on empirical data to provide a balanced understanding of the status of women in the South today.

Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women

July 1, 2015

Say Her Name sheds light on Black women's experiences of police violence in an effort to support a gender-inclusive approach to racial justice that centers all Black lives equally. It is our hope that this document will serve as a tool for the resurgent racial justice movement to mobilize around the stories of Black women who have lost their lives to police violence.

Closing the Window of Opportunity: The Impact of the Governor's Proposed 2013-14 New York State Budget on New York City's Women, Youth and Families

February 16, 2013

A budget is one of the principal ways in which governments express their priorities and values. With this in mind, each year The New York Women's Foundation, in partnership with the FiscalPolicy Institute, reviews the proposed Governor's Budget to determine its impact on New York City's women, youth and families.When viewed with a gender lens, the Governor's 2013-2014 budget impacts New York City's low-income women and their families in many ways, from decreased resources for low-income women seeking to get a foothold in the job market, to reduced funding for a wide range of essential support services, including access to child care.

A Harder Struggle, Fewer Opportunities: The Impact of the Governor's Proposed Budget on Women, Children and Families

March 23, 2011

Examines how proposed cuts to human services programs and public sector employment will affect women, who make up a majority of single parents, the poor, and the elderly, as well as their children; their chances of moving out of poverty; and the economy.

Doing the Work that Makes All Work Possible: A Research Narrative of Filipino Domestic Workers in the Tri-state Area - Executive Summary

October 23, 2010

DAMAYAN Migrant Workers Association, in partnership with the Community Development Project of the Urban Justice Center, engaged in this multi-year study to understand the plight of Filipino domestic workers living in the tri-state area. The study utilized a community-based participatory action research approach (CBPAR). From inception to release, domestic workers, their children, staff members and volunteers have been involved in multiple levels of this research. Domestic workers were purposefully involved in the analyzing, writing and designing of the report. While there are volumes of literature written about the conditions of Filipino domestic workers worldwide, few studies focus on the migration and labor of Filipino domestic workers in the US; and none have made Filipino domestic workers comprehensively integral to the CBPAR process such as this one.

A Fabulous Attitude: Low Income LGBTGNC People Surviving and Thriving on Love, Shelter, and Knowledge

January 1, 2010

The Welfare Warriors Research Collaborative was a participatory action research project of Queers for Economic Justice that convened from 2007 to 2010. We came together to investigate the disturbing and infuriating poverty-related violences low income LGBTGNC people navigate every day. Trained in research by a graduate student at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and in documentary video production by the founder of Wapinduzi Productions, we videotaped 10 storytelling interviews and conducted 171 surveys with low income LGBTGNC people of color and white folks in the NYC area. Our findings show that the majority of low income LGBTGNC people are strongly involved in their communities and use many strategies to fight for justice. We deal with continual discrimination and violence at the hands of police as well as staff and guards at government and nonprofit institutions. Those in our research also create personal and community projects that make their lives richer and stronger. Still, the struggles low income LGBTGNC people face are harsh and isolating 69% of survey takers have been homeless at some point in their lives and 40% use isolation as a means to avoid being targeted. Our work shows how racism, transphobia, and homophobia entangle with economic injustice to create such conditions.

The Use of Raids to Fight Trafficking in Persons

January 9, 2009

This report summarizes the findings of a human rights documentation project conducted by the Sex Workers Project in 2007 and 2008 to explore the impacts and effectiveness of current anti-trafficking approaches in the US from a variety of perspectives. It is among the first efforts since the passage of the TVPA to give voice to the perspectives of trafficked persons and sex workers who have experienced anti-trafficking raids. A total of 46 people were interviewed for this report, including immigrant sex workers and trafficked persons who have experienced raids or otherwise had contact with law enforcement, along with service providers, attorneys, and law enforcement personnel. The data collected from this small to medium-sized sample is extremely rich, and suggests that vice raids conducted by local law enforcement agencies are an ineffective means oflocating and identifying trafficked persons. Our research also reveals that vice raids and federal anti-trafficking raids are all too frequently accompanied by violations of the human rights of trafficked persons and sex workers alike, and can therefore be counterproductive to the underlying goals of anti-trafficking initiatives.Our findings suggest that a rights-based and "victim-centered" approach to trafficking in persons requires the development and promotion of alternate methods of identifying and protecting the rights of trafficked persons which prioritizethe needs, agency, and self-determination of trafficking survivors.They also indicate that preventative approaches, which address the circumstances that facilitate trafficking in persons, should be pursued over law enforcement based responses.

The Economic Status of Women in New York State

June 26, 2008

Assesses the employment and earnings, as well as the social and economic autonomy, of the state's women by race/ethnicity compared with men and with other states. Analyzes barriers to equality and makes policy recommendations.

The Governor's Proposed 2012-13 New York State Budget: Continued Scarce Funding for Women, Families and Youth in a Weak Recovery

January 1, 2000

A budget is one of the principal ways in which governments express their priorities and values. With this in mind, each year The New York Women's Foundation, in partnership with the FiscalPolicy Institute, reviews the proposed Governor's Budget to determine its impact on New York City's women, youth and families.When viewed with a gender lens, the Governor's 2013-2014 budget impacts New York City's low-income women and their families in many ways, from decreased resources for low-income women seeking to get a foothold in the job market, to reduced funding for a wide range of essential support services, including access to child care.