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Mapping Gun Homicides in California

August 10, 2023

Thanks to the meaningful investment and support from Kaiser Permanente, the California Gun Homicides 2014 - 2022 dashboard was built to visualize and conceptualize the available data of reported gun homicides; and is part of a larger effort by Hope and Heal Fund and RomoGIS Enterprises  to raise awareness about where and when gun-related homicides have occurred in California communities.The team harnessed the collective power of gun violence prevention community stakeholders, data-gathering processes, and technology to publicize near real-time and accurate gun-related homicide data, which is needed in order to create actionable change to improve the safety and quality of life throughout California's communities. This project is an example of the strategic approach of Hope and Heal Fund, and we are hopeful that this challenges our field and contributes to furthering efforts to reduce gun violence in our state and across the country.Our goal for this mapping project is to better contextualize and visualize current gun homicide data in California. Our efforts are intentionally aligned with the  Violence Policy Center 's recommendations "...to make current public databases more easily accessed and understood to increase their utility" (June 2019). We understand the available gun violence data is currently difficult for communities to utilize for actionable change. That is why we built both a filter by year and/or by county buttons along with an interactive chart in the dashboard, as well as made county-specific visualization tools, so that users of the dashboard can easily see and interact with available gun violence data for the state of California. With generous funding from Kaiser Permanente, Hope and Heal Fund and RomoGIS are able to do this work to better understand how to support California communities impacted by gun violence. This effort initially set out to counter inaccurate assumptions regarding urban centers being the primary drivers of gun homicides in California. The map clearly illustrates that non-urban settings are being impacted and contribute heavily to the total firearm homicides. Despite achieving our initial goal, this map has led to larger questions that we are currently investigating and attempting to map. Additionally, we hope communities, philanthropic organizations, the nonprofit sector, governmental stakeholders, and other key partners will utilize and benefit from this information. Specifically, we ask partners and stakeholders to consider the implications of this information and how it can be leveraged to develop opportunities that are strategic, focused, and surgical in reducing gun violence across the state.

High Stakes High Reward: How All Funders Can Make Critical Catalytic Contributions to Investing in the Financial Security of Youth and Young Adults

August 2, 2023

To support movement toward a country where all young people can thrive, this brief provides:An explanation of what financial security means for youth and young adults and what allows them to experience it now and in later adulthood.An analysis of the state of young adults' financial well-being today and barriers to it.A vision for what it will take to provide the necessary foundations of financial well-being for all young adults and the policy solutions that could move the needle.High impact recommendations for philanthropy to catalyze a whole-of-society approach to investing in young people.

Social Insurance during the Pandemic: Successes, Shortcomings, and Policy Options for the Future

June 1, 2023

In June, 2023, the National Academy of Social Insurance (the Academy) published the report, Social Insurance during the Pandemic: Successes, Failures, and Policy Options for the Future. The report describes and evaluates the ways in which our nation's social insurance system performed during the pandemic, highlights the successes and shortcomings, and provides lessons that can be applied in anticipation of future crises.The good news is that the study found that the U.S. social insurance system, including programs like Social Security and Medicare, performed well during the pandemic. The significant drop in economic activity during the crisis did not undercut the Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds as had been feared. However, the pandemic did result in reductions in the number of people who received important benefits such as Supplemental Security Income and Disability Insurance due to the closing of Social Security field offices and employees' transition to remote work. The pandemic also exacerbated inequalities across race and ethnicity and took a disproportionate toll on the lives of older people, particularly those residing in nursing homes. This comprehensive report provides 44 policy options that fall into three categories: options that would make permanent or automatically trigger new programs established during the pandemic such as automatic increases in the federal share of Medicaid spending and lowering administrative burdens for programs like Supplemental Security Income and SNAP during economic downturns; new policies where the pandemic uncovered a need for improvements such as closing the digital divide; and recommended improvements in data collection and research to understand the consequences and shortcomings of the pandemic.The Academy launched the report first with its members this summer at a webinar in which RRF made opening remarks. The Academy will follow up this fall with webinars for advocates and policymakers to roll out a series of fact sheets and a toolkit for their use in seeking policy reforms. The Academy's members include 1,200 elected social insurance experts, affiliated with universities, think tanks, business, labor, legislative and executive branches of federal or state government, and advocacy and interest groups. Its work is widely regarded as unbiased and authoritative, and its members are often called upon by journalists and citizen groups to explain issues that come up in policy debates.RRF is proud to be a funding partner with the Academy on this seminal work. Click "Download" to access this resource.

Evaluation of the Baltimore Health Corps Pilot: An Economic and Public Health Response to the Coronavirus

September 30, 2022

The Baltimore Health Corps was a city-run pilot launched in June 2020 and concluding in December, 2021. The pilot simultaneously addressed two issues: the spread of COVID-19 and the resulting employment crisis faced by Baltimore residents.The Baltimore City Health Department and the Mayor's Office of Employment Development led the Baltimore Health Corps, drawing on their experiences with equitable recruitment and hiring practices, workforce-supporting activities and public health worker training. Together, they led a team of public and private partners that included the Baltimore Civic Fund, Baltimore Corps, HealthCare Access Maryland (HCAM), Jhpiego and the Mayor's Office of Performance and Innovation.The initiative tracked those who contracted the virus at the height of the pandemic and connected COVID-19-positive individuals with testing, resources and other assistance. In doing so, the Baltimore Health Corps also placed unemployed workers on a path to high-quality, lasting careers via temporary positions as community health workers with the Baltimore City Health Department and HealthCare Access Maryland (HCAM). The program hired from a pool of Baltimore residents who reflected the city's racial and ethnic demographics and were unemployed, underemployed or furloughed because of the pandemic. By September 2021, 336 health workers had received training and took on roles within either the Health Corps' contact tracing and outreach program or the care coordination and access program.While these health worker positions were intended to last just eight months, as the pandemic persisted, the jobs were extended thanks to funding from the American Rescue Plan Act. As of May 2022, 126 Baltimore Health Corps workers remain employed with either the health department or HCAM, while 119 former staff members have since moved on to other employment opportunities.This is the Final Report to follow the Early Lessons Report for the Baltimore Health Corps Pilot Study. Readers are encouraged to review the Early Lessons Report for a detailed description of the formation of the Pilot Study, the role of each partner, as well as findings from the first year of the Pilot Study.

Tackling the Dual Economic and Public Health Crises Caused by Covid-19 in Baltimore: Early Lessons from the Baltimore Health Corps Pilot

April 13, 2022

On March 12, 2020, the first case of Covid-19 was diagnosed in Baltimore City. Its infection rate increased rapidly through March and into April and May, proving to be 4 times higher among Latino residents and 1.5 times higher among Black residents than the city's White population. At the same time, the city's unemployment rate surged from 4.9 percent in March to a peak of 11.6 percent in April 2020. In June, The Rockefeller Foundation supported the Baltimore City government in launching the Baltimore Health Corps (BHC), a pilot program to recruit, train, and employ 275 new community health workers who were unemployed, furloughed, or underemployed, living in neighborhoods hardest hit by the health crisis and especially those residents unemployed as a result of Covid-19. BHC used equitable recruitment and hiring practices to employ contact tracers, care coordinators, and support staff, with a focus on good jobs, fair pay, training, skill-building, and support to improve career trajectories. This report, compiling data and interviews midway through the project, is a look at some of the early successes and the challenges ahead.

Together We Protect: Vaccine Equity Fund Report 2021

October 20, 2021

In early 2021, the hope of ending the pandemic became a reality with new vaccines available to protect people from COVID-19. The challenge then became how to vaccinate the entire world knowing that many barriers existed in achieving this goal. In response, thirteen funding partners, Immunize Colorado and the Colorado Vaccine Equity Task Force formed a unique partnership to provide rapid funding into communities highly impacted by COVID-19 to ensure communities of color and those who face systemic barriers have the best possible information about the COVID-19 vaccine and can access the vaccine through low-barrier opportunities. Together We Protect – Colorado's COVID-19 Vaccine Equity Fund (TWP) was launched in March 2021, with Caring for Colorado Foundation serving as the coordinating entity. This report examines the impact of the program so far.

Big Cities Health Coalition Annual Report 2020

April 2, 2021

Big city health departments made a huge impact in 2020. Faced with a once-in-a-century pandemic, funding shortages, and political pressures, public health leaders worked tirelessly to protect the health of their jurisdictions. In our 2020 Annual Report, we highlight just a few of the countless ways that we worked with members to advance equity and health in our cities.

Fostering Physical Activity for Children and Youth: Opportunities for a Lifetime of Health

July 22, 2019

Provides background research about the current state of physical activity in the nation and highlights organizational practices and public policies to improve physical activity among children and youth. The report serves as a launching pad for action for practitioners and advocates who are interested in engaging in systems and environmental change approaches in four key arenas: schools, early childcare and education settings, out-of-school-time programs, and communities.Commissioned by the Convergence Partnership, a national collaborative of health funders in the U.S., the report was informed by research and key informant interviews. Reflecting the Convergence Partnership's vision, the report's analysis of policy opportunities at the federal, state and local level emphasizes ways to ensure that health equity is at the forefront of collaborative efforts.This document is part of a larger strategy to identify high-impact approaches that will move the Convergence Partnership closer to the vision of healthy people in healthy places. In addition to this document, the Partnership has released other policy briefs on topics such as the built environment and access to healthy food.

State ESSA Plans to Support Student Health and Wellness: A Framework for Action

March 1, 2017

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) recognizes the vital role that health and wellness play in education. This document focuses on supporting advocates who are interested in working with statelevel policymakers to develop state ESSA plans. It provides practical resources and emphasizes several key areas with the greatest potential impact on student health.

The Raising of America: Action Toolkit

January 1, 2015

The Raising of America seeks to encourage a national conversation that links early child relationships and environments to their impact on the biology of young children, and how these in turn influence adult outcomes as well as the future of the nation.The series was created in the context of a national public engagement campaign, with partners across the nation at the national, state and local level committed to using the series to generate dialogue about what we can—and should—do to make a strong start the birthright of every infant in the United States.Ultimately, the success of The Raising of America will be measured by how effectively educators, providers, organizers, parents, public officials, advocates, and people like you use the series to educate, organize and advocate for change.

New Graduate RN Transition Program Evaluation and Replication

May 25, 2012

Evaluates the impact of pilot programs to improve new nurses' self-confidence, competencies in acute and non-acute specialties and advanced generalist skills, and employment outcomes. Includes best practices and recommendations for future programs.

Healthy Parks, Schools and Communities: Green Access and Equity in Orange County

March 16, 2011

Analyzes children's fitness, obesity, and park access by race/ethnicity, district, and poverty. Outlines the health, community, cultural, and environmental benefits of as well as equal justice issues related to green access. Makes recommendations.