Clear all

11 results found

reorder grid_view

Global Philanthropy Tracker 2020

October 22, 2020

The Global Philanthropy Tracker (GPT) details the magnitude of cross-border philanthropic contributions globally. By capturing contributions made by individual and institutional donors to support charitable causes across national borders, this report aims to offer a more complete picture of global philanthropic flows. The 2020 GPT provides an updated estimate of the amount of cross-border philanthropy that occurred in 2018 or the most recent year for which data are available. It further compares cross-border philanthropy to three other cross-border resource flows: official development assistance (ODA), remittances, and private capital investment.

Index of Philanthropic Freedom 2015

June 15, 2015

The Index of Philanthropic Freedom 2015 is the first analysis of philanthropic freedom across the world. By examining barriers and incentives for individuals and organizations to donate money and time to social causes, CGP has measured, ranked, and compared countries on their ease of giving. The research is a major step in identifying the public policy actions to encourage private giving which, in turn, can increase generosity.

Economic Analysis of Climate Change Adaptation Strategies in Selected Coastal Areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

January 1, 2013

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards. It employed a variety of techniques, ranging from participatory based approaches such as community hazard mapping and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) to regression techniques, to analyze the impact of climate change and the behavior of affected communities and households.

Artisans Must Adapt to Reach New Markets

September 30, 2009

This case study, published in September 2009, is the second in a series focusing on our Investment Climate and Business Environment Research Fund. It reflects on recent findings that Kenyan potters must learn to think like entrepreneurs, developing new products and marketing them far and wide.

Fishing for Solutions in the Great Lakes Region

September 19, 2009

This case study, published in September 2009, is the first in a series focusing on our Investment Climate and Business Environment Research Fund. It reflects on recent findings that the adoption of sustainable fishing practices could save the Nile perch, lift incomes, and preserve livelihoods among Uganda's poor

Riding the Ups and Downs of Foreign Exchange

September 1, 2009

This case study, published in October 2009, is the third in a series focusing on our Investment Climate and Business Environment Research Fund. It reflects on recent findings that for Tanzania's importers and exporters, limiting exposure to currency fluctuations may spell the difference between failure and success.

Fishery Co-management: A Practical Handbook

January 1, 2006

For many years, Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has maintained an active portfolio of projects examining co-management and community-based management in fisheries and other resource systems. Since the publication of Managing Small-scale Fisheries (Berkes et al., 2001), there has been an increasing demand for guidance on what IDRC has learned about co-management, particularly across different geographical settings, socio-economic conditions, and histories of operation; and how it could apply to other types of fishing, link to other livelihoods, relate to other dynamic processes (such as the migration of fishermen), and respond to the seasonal nature of fish resources. This book attempts to respond to this demand by compiling recent experience from as wide a cross section of research as possible. During the development of this book, both IDRC and the authors wrestled with the concept of co-management. Given the evolving nature of this science, for example, what does co-management cover and how widely is the concept accepted? Importantly, there has been increasing acceptance of the idea that co-management is not an end point but rather a process -- a process of adaptive learning. Recognizing the diversity of both local contexts (ecological and social) and factors depleting the fishery (such as overfishing and habitat destruction), however, would it even be possible to put together a book of lessons learned? As you will soon discover, IDRC and the authors felt that it was neither possible nor desirable to produce a blueprint for fishery co-management. Rather, we agreed that it would be more useful to document the co-management process, as undertaken by both IDRC partners and others, and to put this experience into a form that could be shared with anyone interested in learning more about co-management and what others have learned. This shared and adaptive approach to learning is what this book is all about. In the pages that follow, you will find a complete picture of the co-management process: strengths, weaknesses, methods, activities, checklists and so on.

Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean: Resilience, Adaptation, and Community Diversity

January 1, 2006

The Caribbean Sea is the second largest sea in the world, including more than 30 insular and continental countries with an approximate population of 35 million. In addition to its highly fractionalized territory, it is characterized by a great linguistic and cultural diversity, a phenomenon enhanced by increasing internal migrations and the expansion of tourism. The implementation of coastal management programs, often embedded in top-down approaches, is therefore faced with a series of ecological and social constraints, explaining why they have had only limited success. This book presents an alternative look at existing coastal management initiatives in the North America (Caribbean); focusing on the need to pay more attention to the local community. Emphasizing the great heterogeneity of Caribbean communities, the book shows how the diversity of ecosystems and cultures has generated a significant resilience and capacity to adapt, in which the notion of community itself has to be re-examined. The concluding chapter presents lessons learned and a series of practical recommendations for decision-makers.

The Fluid Mosaic: Water Governance in the Context of Variability, Uncertainty and Change, A Synthesis Paper

January 1, 2003

This report summarises five years of collaborative investigation by Indian and Nepali researchers on water management needs and options in Gujarat, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu and parts of Nepal. The sections focus on the specific water management issues and challenges in case study areas. The core messages, however, relate to the fluid mosaic of water governance -- how society may be able to address the sharp edged, immediate constraints present at local levels and shaped by local conditions but ordered within a larger, changing, fluid and poorly understood picture.Field research in case study areas was conducted by Nepal Water Conservation Foundation (NWCF, Kathmandu, Nepal), the Madras Institute of Development Studies (MIDS, Chennai, Tamil Nadu), the Institute of Development Studies, Jaipur (IDS, Jaipur, Rajasthan) and the Vikram Sarabhai Centre for Development Interaction (VIKSAT, Ahmedabad, Gujarat). The Institute for Social and Environmental Transition (ISET, Boulder, Colorado) coordinated and supported the project.

Managing Small-scale Fisheries: Alternative Directions and Methods

January 1, 2001

Human dependence on marine and coastal resources is increasing. Today, small-scale fisheries employ 50 of the world's 51 million fishers, practically all of whom are from developing countries. And together, they produce more than half of the world's annual marine fish catch of 98 million tonnes, supplying most of the fish consumed in the developing world. At the same time, increased fishery overexploitation and habitat degradation are threatening the Earth's coastal and marine resources. Most small-scale fisheries have not been well managed, if they have been managed at all. Existing approaches have failed to constrain fishing capacity or to manage conflict. They have not kept pace with technology or with the driving forces of economics, population growth, demand for food, and poverty. Worldwide, the management and governance of small-scale fisheries is in urgent need of reform. This publication looks beyond the scope of conventional fishery management to alternative concepts, tools, methods, and conservation strategies. There is, for example, broader emphasis on ecosystem management and participatory decision-making. Interested readers will include fishery managers, both governmental and nongovernmental; instructors and students in fishery management; development organizations and practitioners working on small-scale fisheries; and fishers and fishing communities that wish to take responsibility for managing their own resources.

Rethinking the Mosaic: Investigations into Local Water Management

January 1, 1999

This is the report of the first phase of the collaborative program on Local Supply and Conservation Responses to Water Scarcity supported by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and The Ford Foundation. The study investigated water management issues of four river basins: the Palar, the Sabarmati, and the Shekhawatiin Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Rajasthan respectively as well as the Tinau in Nepal that joins the West Rapti in Uttar Pradesh. Water management challenges in the Noyyal and the Bhavani basins of Tamil Nadu were also investigated.In the first three basins, water scarcity is an increasingly grim reality. The organizations and their principal investigators have extensive experience in analysing water management issues in scarcity situations. The fourth river basin was selected to capture the physical diversity of a Himalayan river and to analyse the water management concerns in an area of Nepal and India that is ostensibly rich in water resources but is beginning to confront a situation of stress.