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Starting out Behind: Trends in Student Loan Burdens at For-Profit Colleges

May 11, 2015

This study analyzes the impact of postsecondary institution type and student characteristics on students' decision whether to borrow and how much to borrow to finance their education. Using data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study from the 2011-2012 academic year, the study uses a two-stage regression model in order to estimate the impacts of student and institutional characteristics on the probability that a student would borrow and, for students who borrowed, their student debt burdens. The model controls for a number of financial resources available to students, institution characteristics, and student and family characteristics that could contribute to variations in debt between for-profit, nonprofit, and public colleges, including the total cost of attendance, amount of parental support, expected family contribution, and amount of grants received.

Struggling to Stay Afloat: Negative Equity in Communities of Color in the Chicago Six County Region

March 22, 2012

The following analysis examines patterns of negative equity in communities of different racial and ethnic compositions in the Chicago six county region. It combines 2011 data on negative equity in Chicago region ZIP codes with U.S. Census data on the racial/ethnic composition of ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTA).

Supportive Housing in Illinois: A Wise Investment

January 4, 2009

This study reports on 177 supportive housing residents around Illinois, comparing their use of publicly-funded services two years before entering supportive housing to two years after entry. Data were collected from Medicaid-reimbursed services, state mental health hospitals, substance use treatment, state prisons, and various county jails and hospitals. The study found an overall cost savings of over $850,000 in the two years after entry into supportive housing, a little over $2,400 per person annually. There was a drastic reduction in state prison, county jail, and state mental health hospital overnight stays. There was a shift from using expensive inpatient services before housing (nursing homes, inpatient care, state mental health hospitals) to less expensive outpatient services after entry into housing (outpatient medical and psychiatric care, case management). Supportive Housing in Illinois: A Wise Investment was researched and written by the Heartland Alliance Mid-America Institute on Poverty with support from the Illinois Supportive Housing Providers Association and the Corporation for Supportive Housing.

Study of Supportive Housing in Illinois: Interim Report on Publicly-Funded Service Usage by Residents Prior to Entry into Supportive Housing

August 1, 2008

This study was launched to document and analyze supportive housing residents' use of public services prior to entering housing and afterwards, in order to determine the cost savings of supportive housing to other systems. The hypothesis of the study is that supportive housing reduces a person's usage of expensive, primarily public-funded services.The study tracks individuals' amount of service usage for 2 years before they entered supportive housing, comparing it to their usage of services 2 years after, as well as the change in types of services utilized over time. The study included supportive housing residents across Illinois living in developments that had been in operation for at least one year, and that served individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, and individuals who have a mental illness and/or who are formerly incarcerated.