Clear all

210 results found

reorder grid_view

Local leadership driving progress on the Sustainable Development Goals

June 24, 2022

As the halfway point to 2030 nears, the importance of cities and local leaders to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has become clear. A global, city-led movement is going beyond the confines of SDG 11 to demonstrate leadership on all aspects of the SDGs, characterized by innovation, action, and progress on display, as local leaders adapt the framework to their own scale and context.As mayors and city officials translate lofty aspirations of the goals into the practical aspects of governing, they are using the SDGs to assess gaps in services and outcomes, create new policy interventions, and integrate a sustainable development mindset into city operations and regular processes of decisionmaking.This report builds on the experiences of the SDG Leadership Cities Network hosted by the Center for Sustainable Development at Brookings to take stock of the key role of city and local governments in driving local and global progress, and the effects of their SDG commitments on improving their operations, effectiveness, and impact.Innovations by cities are tangibly demonstrating the interdependencies among the SDGs. The COVID-19 crisis and the urgency to build an equitable and sustainable recovery reinforced the need for advancing progress on multiple issues simultaneously. Analysis based on the SDGs has offered cities a vision for the form that a deliberate departure from "business as usual" may take, resulting in a transformation of public life.At the center of this movement, city leadership is undergoing a mindset shift, going beyond reporting on targets and goals to building a shared local commitment that enables collaboration across sectors and jurisdictions. As a common language and set of shared ambitions, the SDGs can act as connective tissue that provide a basis for new forms of partnership and bring together various sources of leadership for joint action from the public and private sectors, involving a wide range of stakeholders important to the vibrancy of cities.

Thinking globally, acting locally: How community foundations are contributing to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

November 19, 2021

This report looks at how the place-based community foundation model aligns with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Using examples from across the community foundation network, it demonstrates how the work of local organisations, the long-term support of donors, and a focus on place are key to driving sustainable change in communities. It shows how community foundations use their place-based knowledge and relationships to convene different local actors around the Goals.As well as providing examples of how our place-based work fits within a global context, the report also calls for more sustainable funding practices such as multi-year funding and increased flexibility from donors and grant-makers. In addition to this, the report shows how the SDGs can be used by civil society to help communicate its huge impact and to leverage further support from the private sector as it increasingly turns to the SDGs to measure social impact.The report is relevant to funders, philanthropists, corporates, local charities, and other institutions that are invested in seeing sustainable social change in communities across the UK.

Mismatched: Philanthropy’s Response to the Call for Racial Justice

October 16, 2021

Mismatched: Philanthropy's Response to the Call for Racial Justice is the most comprehensive assessment of racial equity and racial justice funding to date, providing a detailed analysis of funding from 2015–2018 and a preliminary analysis for 2020. Written by Malkia Devich Cyril, Lyle Matthew Kan, Ben Francisco Maulbeck, and Lori Villarosa, the report examines trends, contradictions, and divergences in funding for both racial equity and racial justice work.

Putting Data to Work for Young People: A Framework for Measurement, Continuous Improvement, and Equitable Systems

July 13, 2021

Systems that coordinate afterschool, summer and other out-of-school-time programming communitywide have emerged in a number of U.S. cities and counties over the last 15 years or so. The organizations that oversee these systems increasingly recognize the need for periodic pulse checks to evaluate their efforts and inform improvements. But what, exactly, should these organizations assess and how?In 2014, a framework to help answer that was developed by Every Hour Counts, a national coalition of citywide organizations that seeks to increase access to high-quality learning opportunities, particularly for students from underserved communities. This framework is a research-informed update of the tool.The heart of the framework is 11 desired outcomes of system work, some or all of which system leaders might want to measure progress toward, depending on local needs and circumstances. Five are directly related to overall system work and include whether a common goal for afterschool has been established. Three regard the efforts of programs, stressing, for instance, that they use management practices that enhance program quality. And three are related to young people—the rate of youth participation in programs, among them.For each of the 11 items, the tool describes indicators signaling progress toward the outcome; the type of data that can be collected for the indicators; ideas for working with the data; and ways to interpret and use the findings. A feature of the update from the 2014 version of the framework is a set of racial equity questions for each outcome, exploring matters ranging from whether system decision-making is inclusive to whether programs distribute high-quality offerings equitably. 

Putting Data to Work for Young People Guidebook: A Guidebook for the Every Hour Counts Framework for Measurement, Continuous Improvement, and Equitable Systems

July 13, 2021

Systems that coordinate afterschool, summer and other out-of-school-time programming communitywide have emerged in a number of U.S. cities and counties over the last 15 years or so. The organizations that oversee these systems increasingly recognize the need for periodic pulse checks to evaluate their efforts and inform improvements. But what, exactly, should these organizations assess and how?In 2014, a framework to help answer that was developed by Every Hour Counts, a national coalition of citywide organizations that seeks to increase access to high-quality learning opportunities, particularly for students from underserved communities. This framework is a research-informed update of the tool.The heart of the framework is 11 desired outcomes of system work, some or all of which system leaders might want to measure progress toward, depending on local needs and circumstances. Five are directly related to overall system work and include whether a common goal for afterschool has been established. Three regard the efforts of programs, stressing, for instance, that they use management practices that enhance program quality. And three are related to young people—the rate of youth participation in programs, among them.For each of the 11 items, the tool describes indicators signaling progress toward the outcome; the type of data that can be collected for the indicators; ideas for working with the data; and ways to interpret and use the findings. A feature of the update from the 2014 version of the framework is a set of racial equity questions for each outcome, exploring matters ranging from whether system decision-making is inclusive to whether programs distribute high-quality offerings equitably. 

State of the Community Foundation Field in Europe 2020

January 1, 2021

Building an understanding of the shape and work of the community foundation field is important not only in raising awareness of its scale and scope, for those operating within it and those with an interest in local development, but also to inform further development of the field.In an exceptional year for all societies worldwide, ECFI has conducted its biennial assessment of the community foundation (CF) field in Europe. This report has been informed by a survey of community foundations support organisations (CFSOs) and intelligence gathered through our ongoing engagement with the field.This report provides a snapshot of the field, highlights changes and trends, and identifies some key issues relevant to its further development. There are reflections on the role that community foundations played in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, but also on how this impacted on the community foundations themselves, and how this has altered their thinking and strategies.The analysis of community foundations support organisations (CFSOs) differentiates them by type and shows how this essential part of the field has developed. The work of community foundations support organisations is described and there is a focus on two important areas – what they did differently following the outbreak of Covid-19, and how they are supporting the field in respect of embracing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).Conclusions are drawn from the analysis of the field which will inform ECFI's work which aims to strengthen and promote the community foundation movement in Europe.

The Sustainable Development Goals and Your Community Foundation - Guidebook and Toolkit

August 6, 2020

This Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Guidebook and Toolkit is meant for staff and board members of community foundations at all stages of engaging with the SDGs.The Guidebook and Toolkit is intended to meet community foundations where they are at, to provide practical examples, ideas and steps for aligning current community foundation work with the SDGs, and to provide next steps to deepen their impact through the SDGs. This document is divided into two sections. The first section is an SDG Guidebook. It will introduce the SDGs and provide global, national and local context for the Goals. It will explain why Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) and community foundations are well positioned to align with the SDGs and how the SDGs can deepen collective impact.The Guidebook includes:* An overview of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs* How the global community came together to adopt the SDGs* Key concepts that underlie the SDG Framework and relevance to the work of community foundations* What CFC is doing to advance the SDGsThe second section of this document identifies practical approaches to align current work to the SDGs through an SDG Toolkit. In many cases, community foundations in Canada are already doing work towards meeting the SDGs, and the Toolkit is designed to show how to align current work with the SDG Framework.

Grantmaking With a Racial Justice Lens : A Practical Guide

December 1, 2019

The new Grantmaking with a Racial Justice Lens: A Practical Guide, written by PRE Senior Fellow Rinku Sen and Executive Director Lori Villarosa with contributions from Maggie Potapchuk, Lisa McGill, and Makani Themba, provides grantmakers with reflections, frameworks and tools built from the direct experience of activists and funders for advancing racial justice in any philanthropic setting.

Sustaining Civil Society: Lessons from Five Pooled Funds in Eastern Europe

October 21, 2019

After 1990, US and European foundations and government agencies invested in a series of Partnerships and Trusts to support civil society in Central and Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Balkans and the Black Sea regions. Analyzing the long-term impact of these investments is crucial, especially as many politicians across these regions increase their anti-civil society rhetoric. Three long-time US foundation staff look back at the legacy and impact of this funding and derive a series of lessons for practitioners seeking to understand how best to sustain civil societies for the long term.

Impact Case Studies: Promoting an enabling environment for philanthropy and civil society

June 19, 2019

This collection of impact case studies illustrates how Philanthropy Support Organizations (PSOs) have implemented successful strategies to promote an enabling environment for civil society and philanthropy to thrive. Through eight cases from different countries, WINGS is bringing to the spotlight experiences that often remain behind the scenes. The publication also features specialized articles from the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL), Forus and CIVICUS. Despite the challenges of shrinking space or lack of conducive fiscal environment, PSOs are creative and have tremendous positive impact on the field in response to these challenges. In this sense, this report is both a source of inspiration and a call to action.

Why Community Foundations Make Perfect Partners for Children’s Savings Accounts: Lessons from the Family Economic Security Alliance

June 18, 2019

Spurred by an expanding field of practice, increasing support from state and local governments, and astrong body of research, children's savings accounts (CSAs) have emerged in the past fifteen years as apromising strategy for building assets and educational expectations for children and youth. To be effective, all CSA programs need local partners to support various aspects of program execution, including building community connections, helping with advocacy and outreach, and assisting program delivery.In this brief, CFLeads articulates why collaboration between community foundations and CSA programs is in their mutual interest. We describe the variety of roles that community foundations can play in promoting the growth and success of CSA programs, and then identify the primary challenges encountered by community foundations in supporting CSAs. The brief concludes with key lessons learned about collaboration between community foundations and CSA programs.

Family Economic Security Action Alliance Evaluation

October 1, 2018

This report presents the major findings of an evaluation on the effectiveness of the 2017-18 CFLeads Family Economic Security Action Alliance (FES Action Alliance). The program, offered by CFLeads, enlisted the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and The Democracy Collaborative as content partners and was supported by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The FES Action Alliance brought together six community foundations from around the country to increase each team's knowledge of family economic security, build peerconnections, seed potential collaborations, and make tangible progress toward addressing a family economic security challenge in the participants' respective communities. Staff from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and The Democracy Collaborative served as coaches for the individual teams, content providers, and facilitators along with CFLeads staff. This summary highlights the strongest findings from surveys and interviews used to evaluate the FES Action Alliance process and its outcomes.