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Lessons from the New York City Cultural Agenda Fund

July 26, 2019

In 2014, The New York Community Trust brought together a small group of funders and advocates to figure out how the arts community could play a role in shaping the City's cultural plan. The New York City Cultural Agenda Fund, a funder collaborative, grew out of the group's recognition that New York City needed a strong and vocal advocacy community with a deep understanding of equity to effect change. Led by The New York Community Trust and Lambent Foundation, the Cultural Agenda Fund's goals were to strengthen advocacy, influence policy, and advance equity by ensuring that small and diverse arts groups were valued.

An Evaluation of the Bloomberg Housing Program and Recommendations to Strengthen Affordable Housing Policy

January 1, 2013

ANHD's research finds that 1/3 of subsidized housing built in NYC since 2003 is unaffordable for local residents. Report includes tools to help city and local organizations gauge how well proposed housing will meet community needs.

Staying in School: Arts Education and New York City High School Graduation Rates

October 31, 2009

Explores links between arts education -- certified teachers, dedicated and equipped arts classrooms, partnerships, field trips -- and high school graduation rates in New York City public schools. Calls for arts instruction for at-risk students.

Community Change for Youth Development: Ten Lessons from the CCYD Initiative

December 1, 2002

From 1995 through 2002, P/PV worked with six neighborhoods around the country to develop and institute a framework of "core concepts" to guide youth programming for the nonschool hours. The goal was to create programming that would involve a high proportion of each neighborhood's several thousand adolescents. This report summarizes the basic lessons that emerged from this Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative. The lessons address such topics as the usefulness of a "core concepts" approach; the dos and don'ts of involving neighborhood residents in change initiatives; the role of research; the role of youth; and the capacity of neighborhood-wide approaches to attract high-risk youth.

Community Change for Youth Development in Kansas City

October 30, 2001

Kansas City, Missouri, is one of six sites in Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD), a national demonstration project aiming to increase basic supports and opportunities available to youth aged 12-20. The lead agency is the YMCA of Greater Kansas City; because of its considerable organizational capacity and relationship with funders, the YMCA was successful in operating and expanding CCYD. This report focuses on the benefits of working with the YMCA of Greater Kansas City and the challenges faced by the organization in leading a community-based initiative in three urban neighborhoods.

Resident Involvement in Community Change: The Experiences of Two Initiatives

June 12, 1999

The 1990s saw a resurgence of interest in community development initiatives targeting poor and disadvantaged communities. That resurgence involves at least one major assumption: that involving residents -- both adults and youth -- creates community ownership and increases grassroots participation in ways that will ultimately lead to stronger, more sustainable initiatives. This report examines the development of resident involvement strategies in eight sites participating in P/PV's Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative and Plain Talk, The Annie E. Casey Foundation's initiative to prevent teen pregnancy (which P/PV evaluated). The authors identify three stages of resident involvement observed across all eight sites; document the ways in which residents contributed to the local site activities; and discuss the challenges of resident governance strategies.