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Evaluation of the 100,000 Homes Campaign in Chicago Final Report: Executive Summary

December 6, 2011

The AIDS Foundation of Chicago (AFC) partnered with CURL to conduct a process evaluation of the Chicago 100,000 Homes Campaign, with a focus on outreach and housing coordination. Qualitative analysis consisted of observations, telephone and in person interviews, as well as, focus groups. Quantitative analysis consisted of analyzing participant data and administrative records. The evaluation is informing key stakeholders of Chicago's homeless system in their efforts to develop a centralized housing placement system citywide. 

Evaluation of the 100,000 Homes Campaign in Chicago Final Report

December 6, 2011

The AIDS Foundation of Chicago (AFC) partnered with CURL to conduct a process evaluation of the Chicago 100,000 Homes Campaign, with a focus on outreach and housing coordination. Qualitative analysis consisted of observations, telephone and in person interviews, as well as, focus groups. Quantitative analysis consisted of analyzing participant data and administrative records. The evaluation is informing key stakeholders of Chicago's homeless system in their efforts to develop a centralized housing placement system citywide. 

Evaluation of the 100,000 Homes Campaign in Chicago Final Quantitative Data Report

December 6, 2011

The AIDS Foundation of Chicago (AFC) partnered with CURL to conduct a process evaluation of the Chicago 100,000 Homes Campaign, with a focus on outreach and housing  coordination. Qualitative analysis consisted of observations, telephone and in person interviews, as well as, focus groups. Quantitative analysis consisted of analyzing participant data and administrative records. The evaluation is informing key stakeholders of Chicago's homeless system in their efforts to develop a centralized housing placement system citywide. 

Formative Evaluation of the AIDS Foundation of Chicago's Treatment Coordiantor Pilot Program

May 1, 2009

CURL conducted a formative evaluation of the of the AIDS Foundation of Chicago's (AFC) Treatment Coordinator pilot project. This project occurred in two phases.  For the first phase of the project, AFC integrated a new treatment coordinator position into seven pilot agencies. The goal of the position was to create a seamlessly coordinated HIV/AIDS system integrating case management and clinical services, leading to improved individual level indicators and quality of life for clients.  We based our conclusions and recommendations for this phase on a variety of data sources including field observations, site visits, interviews, and one focus group. 

Chicago Area Income, Poverty, and Housing Overview

October 1, 2007

This paper was originally researched for the AIDS Foundation of Chicago for use in their Five-Year Chicago Area HIV/AIDS Housing Plan. Hence, the counties included here are reflective of the counties the AIDS Foundation requested be included in the analysis. Though traditionally included in discussions of the Chicago region, Lake County is not included in this discussion of the Chicago area.

Connecting Fractured Lives to a Fragmented System: Process Evaluation Report Chicago Housing for Health Partnership

May 1, 2007

CURL partnered with the AIDS Foundation of Chicago to evaluate Chicago Housing to Health Partnership (CHHP). This program uses an innovative housing first model for individuals who are homeless, have chronic medical conditions, and have been recently released from the hospital.

Rectal Microbicides: Investments and Advocacy

April 1, 2006

The first-ever report tracking rectal microbicide research and development expenditures, was released on April 24 by the International Rectal Microbicide Working Group (IRMWG) at a special symposium titled "Rectal Microbicides - A New Frontier in HIV Prevention" at the Microbicides 2006 conference in Cape Town, South Africa."This important document describes the current landscape of rectal microbicide research and helps define what resources will be needed to develop a safe and effective rectal microbicide," said one of the field's chief researchers and a key organizer of the symposium, Dr. Ian McGowan of the Center for Prevention Research at the UCLA AIDS Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine.Similar to a vaginal microbicide, a rectal microbicide may be formulated as a gel, cream or lubricant and would provide protection against HIV and other STDs in the absence of a condom during anal intercourse. Studies show that up to 30% of the heterosexual population in many cultures engages in anal intercourse, making the development of a safe, effective rectal microbicide a desperately needed new prevention option for women, males who have sex with males, and gay men around the world."At any given moment, more heterosexual women than gay men are engaging in anal intercourse," said Anna Forbes, Global North Programs Coordinator for the Global Campaign for Microbicides. "A receptive sex partner is a receptive sex partner. We need rectal microbicides, just as we need vaginal microbicides, to help receptive sex partners save their own lives."According to the report, funding for rectal microbicide research totaled US$34 million between 2000 and 2006, an increase from US$2 million in 2000. The U.S. public sector, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH),contributed 97.4% of these funds. Philanthropic funding totaled US$739,649 between 2000 and 2006, accounting for approximately 2.2% of total investments for rectal microbicide research. The commercial sector has yet to contribute actual dollars and instead has supported the work through in-kind donations including time spent, pipeline compounds, and infrastructure. Microbicide funding from the European Union designated specifically to the research and development of a rectal product proved too elusive to track. However, in 2004, Europe contributed 23% of the global resources for microbicides. The report recommends a series of urgent actions to discover a rectal microbicide within a time frame proportionate to the urgency of its need, beginning with a call for a signifcant increase of funding. According to the IRMWG, "donors from all sectors must provide a minimum of US$350 million over 10-15 years, for an average of US$35 million per year, to build a comprehensive rectal microbicide research program." Recommendations for researchers include recruiting new scientists to the field and promoting rectal microbicide research within the scientific community. Advocates must "promote global, national and regional surveillance efforts to determine the percentage of HIV infection attributed to anal intercourse in order to better assess the need for rectal microbicide development," says the report.

Opening Doors: Adapting Housing and Substance Abuse Services to Meet the Needs of HIV/AIDS Impacted Persons

May 1, 2000

The presenters and attendees of the Opening Doors conference worked to develop a series of change priorities that can be used by people in their individual leadership roles and also as a platform that will be forwarded to a wide array of policy makers and policy entities to educate them about ways to better serve people who are impacted by HIV/AIDS, people who are homeless and substance users. This forum was used to identify service gaps and barriers as well as illuminate innovative models that are helping attain stability in housing and health.