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Big Gifts for Little Learners: Making the Case for Philanthropic Investment From Pregnancy Through Preschool

March 21, 2022

The San Francisco Bay Area is home to some of the wealthiest counties and most generous donors in the country. But how do those individuals choose where to spend their philanthropic dollars?In our 2021 survey of Bay Area donors, which included both affluent individuals and foundations, 40% of respondents said that when considering causes or groups to give to, demonstrated impact would lead them to choose one cause or group over others.In some ways it is surprising, then, that only 15% of donors said they give to early care and learning -- an area with robust research demonstrating positive impact on the children supported (including permanent increases in children's IQ and better health outcomes) as well as on their families and the broader community (e.g., gains in maternal workforce participation).

Pandemic Relief & Recovery: Emergency Funding & The Bay Area Arts Community

October 1, 2021

An analysis of the COVID-19 relief support grantmakers provided to Bay Area artists and cultural organizations, how it helped mitigate the crisis, and what the regional arts community needs now to recover.

Student-Centered Learning: Dozier-Libbey Medical High School

January 21, 2014

This case study is one of four written by SCOPE about student-centered practices in schools. The case studies address the following questions:1. What are the effects of student-centered learning approaches on student engagement, achievement of knowledge and skills, and attainment (high school graduation, college admission, and college continuation and success), in particular for underserved students?2. What specific practices, approaches, and contextual factors result in these outcomes?The cases focus on the structures, practices, and conditions in the four schools that enable students to experience positive outcomes and consider the ways in which these factors are interrelated and work to reinforce each other.

Hunger in America 2006 Local Report Prepared for The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano Counties

February 1, 2006

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano Counties. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2006, conducted for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in person interviews with more than 52,000 clients served by the A2H food bank network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 30,000 A2H agencies. The study summarized below focuses mainly on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the A2H network.Key Findings: The A2H system served by the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano Counties provides food for an estimated 75,400 different people annually.33% of the members of households served by The Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).43% of client households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among client households with children, 73% are food insecure and 48% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).43% of clients served by The Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).29% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).24% of households served by The Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1)The Food Bank of Contra Costa & Solano included approximately 176 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 108 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 85 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.60% of pantries, 50% of kitchens, and 12% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).61% of pantries, 80% of kitchens, and 12% of shelters of the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano Counties reported that there had been an increase since 2001 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 70% of the food distributed by pantries, 48% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 49% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).For the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano Counties, 89% of pantries, 84% of kitchens, and 56% of shelters use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).