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Wealth Opportunities Realized Through Homeownership (WORTH): Baseline Report

May 15, 2023

This report is part of an evaluation of the Wealth Opportunities Realized through Homeownership (WORTH) initiative. Led by the Wells Fargo Foundation, WORTH supports efforts to close persistent disparities in homeownership in Atlanta, Houston, Milwaukee, New York, Philadelphia, Richmond, San Diego, and rural and tribal areas. In each market, we examine housing supply and demand, homebuying activity, homeownership trends, and preservation conditions. We found that in almost every market, white households have higher homeownership rates than every other racial or ethnic group. Moreover, macroeconomic forces driving market conditions, like higher interest rates and moderating house prices, can significantly dampen or thwart market collaboratives' efforts to boost homeownership rates for people of color. Future evaluation will examine the implementation processes used in each market. The larger body of work contributes to understanding the crucial connection between homeownership and wealth-building and the multitude of barriers that households of color face in achieving homeownership. It also supports research-backed strategies for increasing homeownership for households of color and for reducing racial disparities.

Sustaining Art Research Collections: Case Studies in Collaboration

April 18, 2023

Art research collections continue to be impacted by the lingering effects of economic uncertainty and the global COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in reduced or stagnant budgets and staffing cuts. These impacts have coincided with a period of institutional reflection and examination of the fundamental role of cultural heritage institutions in society. The case studies presented here illustrate how partnerships can support sustainability and growth, and they also share case study participants' generous insights into the lessons learned from their experiences. The report provides recommendations like conducting an upfront analysis of the benefits that a partnership will provide to each participant, understanding the core mission values that a potential partnership would support, and ensuring that the effort required to create and sustain a partnership aligns with the partnership's benefits. This timely report offers key insights into successful and sustainable collaborations for practitioners who may be facing immediate staffing, technology, or space needs and provides a framework that can guide future collaborations that not only meet basic needs, but also advance experimentation and innovation.

Housing Markets and Climate Migration

February 27, 2023

When climate migrants relocate due to sudden or chronic disasters, one of their first priorities is finding shelter, preferably in a home where they can quickly start the process of rebuilding their lives. Yet little is known about the impacts such migrants may have on housing markets in the communities that receive them. The inability of receiving communities to anticipate such effects can stress housing markets—especially where housing availability and affordability is already a challenge—and may require emergency interventions to support both migrants and existing residents.This report provides an examination of the impacts of climate change–induced migrations on housing markets and institutions in three climate migrant receiving communities: the Houston, Texas, metro area, where residents of New Orleans relocated following Hurricane Katrina in 2005; Central Florida, where Puerto Ricans arrived after Hurricane Maria in 2017; and inland parts of Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes in Louisiana, where residents of coastal areas have migrated due to chronic flooding and sea level rise over the past two decades. This report is one of five studies of climate migration and institutional impacts in the project, which examines impacts to housing markets, financial institutions and financial health, employment and economic development, health care systems, housing and social, cultural, and recreational institutions.

Capacities of Health Systems in Climate Migrant Receiving Communities: Insights in the US Gulf Coast

February 27, 2023

This report examines how health care delivery systems in receiving communities meet the needs of climate migrants. The research team drew on insights from interviews with health care providers and county-level data from the Area Resources Health File in three case study sites in the US Gulf Coast: Houston, Texas, where migrants relocated from Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005; Orange and Osceola Counties surrounding Orlando, Florida, where migrants from Puerto Rico relocated after Hurricane Maria in 2017; and northern Lafourche and Terrebonne Parishes, where migrants from southern coastal regions relocated in response to ongoing sea level rise and environmental degradation. We examine how each community's health care system interpreted the needs of climate migrants and how they shifted services in response to those needs over time.This report is one of five studies of climate migration and institutional impacts in the Climate Migration and Receiving Community Institutional Capacity in the US Gulf Coast project, which examines impacts to housing markets, financial institutions and financial health, employment and economic development, health care systems, and social, cultural, and recreational institutions.

Labor Markets in Climate Migrant Receiving Communities

February 27, 2023

There is extensive research on economic and labor market impacts in communities where environmental disasters occur, but there is very little information on the communities that receive people displaced by climate change. This research examines labor market impacts in climate migrant receiving communities in Texas, Louisiana, and Florida. Central Florida, particularly Orange and Osceola Counties, received more than 50,000 climate migrants after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico in 2017. Houston, Texas, received more than 100,000 new residents from New Orleans who were displaced after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, and northern Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes in Louisiana have been receiving communities for individuals and families living further south in the low-lying and bayou communities along the US Gulf Coast for decades.This report is one of five studies of climate migration and institutional impacts in the project, which examines impacts to housing markets, financial institutions and financial health, employment and economic development, health care systems, and social, cultural, and recreational institutions.

Climate Migration and Receiving Community Institutional Capacity in the US Gulf Coast

February 27, 2023

In the coming decades, the US Gulf Coast is expected to experience continued sea level rise, more intense hurricanes, and rising temperatures resulting from climate change, making the region less safe for its residents and likely prompting continued migration both within and out of the region. Climate change–induced disasters and more gradual environmental changes are affecting all areas of the country, and growing numbers of people are moving to different communities and regions to escape these hazards. Accordingly, climate resilience in the Gulf Coast and nationwide must be assessed by communities' capacity to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change, as well as the ability of both sending and receiving communities to plan for climate migration.This overarching report introduces the five areas of study and the three case study communities; synthesizes key observations from the five studies about institutional and community capacity to welcome and support climate migrants in the US Gulf Coast; and offers recommendations for communities and regions poised to receive climate migrants to support coordination, planning, and policy.

Social, Cultural, and Recreational Institutions and Climate Migration: An Evaluation of Socio-Cultural Practices in Receiving Communities

February 27, 2023

This report examines the roles that social, cultural, and recreational institutions play in responding to the needs of climate migrants in three US Gulf Coast receiving communities: Orange and Osceola Counties surrounding Orlando, Florida; Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes in Louisiana; and Houston, Texas. This study investigates the social, cultural, and recreational conditions that existed in receiving communities before and after climate migrants' arrival; the responses undertaken by institutions and providers to respond to migrants; and how institutional conditions and capacities in receiving communities have changed over time.This report is one of five studies of climate migration and institutional impacts in the Climate Migration and Receiving Community Institutional Capacity in the US Gulf Coast project, which examines impacts to housing markets, financial institutions and financial health, employment and economic development, health care systems, and social, cultural, and recreational institutions.

The Effect of Climate Migrants on the Financial Well-Being of Receiving Communities

February 27, 2023

This report examines the capacity of financial institutions in climate migrant receiving communities to support and integrate migrants in three case study sites in the US Gulf Coast: Houston, Texas, where migrants relocated from Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005; Orange and Osceola Counties surrounding Orlando, Florida, where migrants from Puerto Rico relocated after Hurricane Maria in 2017; and northern Lafourche and Terrebonne Parishes, where migrants from southern coastal regions relocated in response to ongoing sea level rise and environmental degradation.This study examines what financial services and related assistance receiving communities provided to climate migrants before, during, and after migration events and assesses long-term changes in financial outcomes for receiving communities by examining the credit health of residents over time.This report is one of five studies of climate migration and institutional impacts in the Climate Migration and Receiving Community Institutional Capacity in the US Gulf Coast project, which examines impacts to housing markets, financial institutions and financial health, employment and economic development, health care systems, and social, cultural, and recreational institutions.

Changing the Playbook: Immigrants and the COVID-19 Response in Two U.S. Communities

July 27, 2022

U.S. cities and towns have responded to COVID-19 in ways that are as diverse as the communities they aim to support. This report looks at how two very different locations—Worthington, MN, and the greater Houston area—incorporated immigrants into their relief efforts, through partnerships, strategic outreach, targeted assistance, and more. The report also highlights useful lessons for responses to future emergencies.

Continuing Efforts To Slow Violent Crime: Promising Innovations From 3 Democrat-Led Cities

July 27, 2022

Historically, the United States' approach to crime has been reactionary and overreliant on criminal legal sanctions, and it has failed to adequately address the social, health, and behavioral factors that drive crime. Still, as the country continues to grapple with a rise in gun violence, a new wave of "tough-on-crime" rhetoric has emerged, blaming progressive policies for the increase in violent crime. While violent crime rose across the country in 2020, progressive leaders in cities are investing resources into proven public health and community-based solutions to stop gun violence before it starts, and these cities are seeing early signs of success in stemming the tide.Rather than accept calls for tough-on-crime policies, leaders in Houston, Boston, and Newark, New Jersey, have taken a more holistic approach to prevent violence before it starts. These cities are three examples of jurisdictions that have implemented comprehensive public safety plans focused not only on stopping violent crime but also on prioritizing community-driven and public health-focused innovations that break the cycle of violence.

Houston Muslim Study

May 20, 2022

The purpose of the Houston Muslim Study is to provide an in-depth and policy-relevant study, through a non-security lens, about American Muslims at the local level in Houston, Texas. The study offers fresh insights and helps shape a discussion about American Muslims that is data-driven and moves beyond the generalizations, prejudices, and fear that too often surround public and policy discourses about Muslim communities in America.

Economic Democracy Case Studies

February 8, 2022

The Economic Democracy Project at Demos envisions liberation for Black and brown people. This requires us to address inequities in economic, political, and institutional power. The concept of economic democracy recognizes that everyone deserves a stake in the system and that the economy should exist to serve the people—the demos. In a moment in which a corporate ruling class exploits racial and class divisions to dodge accountability and accumulate power, preserving our democracy requires creating opportunities for the public to lead and shape economic outcomes.The Economic Democracy Project aims to highlight and develop strategies that Black and brown communities can use to build economic and political power. It has 3 priorities:Break up and regulate new corporate power, including Amazon, Google, and Facebook.Expand the meaning of public goods and ensure that services are equitably and publicly administered.Strengthen "co-governance" strategies so that people and public agencies can collectively make decisions about the economy.The case studies outlined here spotlight 4 community campaigns working across the U.S. to reclaim power over economic resources.