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Power of the Purse: Contributions of Hispanic Americans in the Rio Grande Valley

June 3, 2022

New research from the American Immigration Council underscores the crucial role Hispanic Texans play in the Rio Grande Valley's labor force, population growth, and economy. This new fact sheet was prepared in partnership with the Rio Grande Valley Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Texans for Economic Growth.

Power of the Purse: Contributions of Hispanic Americans in the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission Metro Area

June 3, 2022

New research from the American Immigration Council underscores the crucial role Hispanic Texans play in the metro area's labor force, population growth, and economy. This new fact sheet was prepared in partnership with the Rio Grande Valley Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Texans for Economic Growth.

Biden Administration’s Dangerous Haitian Expulsion Strategy Escalates the U.S. History of Illegal and Discriminatory Mistreatment of Haitians Seeking Safety in the United States

September 21, 2021

This fact sheet from Human Rights First and Haitian Bridge Alliance (the Bridge) examines the response of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Biden Administration toward the predominantly Haitian migrants and asylum-seekers who crossed into the United States near Del Rio, Texas in August/September 2021. It also compares the current situation to the approach the United States has historically adopted toward Haitian immigrants and asylum seekers.

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for The South Texas Food Bank

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by The South Texas Food Bank. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed inperson interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network. Key Findings: The FA system served by The South Texas Food Bank provides emergency food for an estimated 76,800 different people annually.36% of the members of households served by The South Texas Food Bank are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).42% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 84% are food insecure and 41% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).45% of clients served by The South Texas Food Bank report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).39% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).41% of households served by The South Texas Food Bank report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1).The South Texas Food Bank included approximately 52 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 51 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 45 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.67% of pantries, 50% of kitchens, and 67% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 65% of pantries, 75% of kitchens, and 67% of shelters of The South Texas Food Bank reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 88% of the food distributed by pantries, 60% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 53% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 88% of pantries, 100% of kitchens, and 67% of shelters in The South Texas Food Bank use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed inperson interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network. Key Findings: The FA system served by The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent provides emergency food for an estimated 47,300 different people annually.34% of the members of households served by The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).34% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 79% are food insecure and 34% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).58% of clients served by The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).41% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).38% of households served by The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1).The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent included approximately 92 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 68 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 37 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.65% of pantries, 60% of kitchens, and 30% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 71% of pantries, 84% of kitchens, and 72% of shelters of The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 75% of the food distributed by pantries, 29% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 32% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 82% of pantries, 68% of kitchens, and 100% of shelters in The Food Bank of the Golden Crescent use volunteers (Table 13.2.1)

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for The Food Bank of Corpus Christi

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by The Food Bank of Corpus Christi. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed inperson interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network.Key Findings: The FA system served by The Food Bank of Corpus Christi provides emergency food for an estimated 112,700 different people annually.27% of the members of households served by The Food Bank of Corpus Christi are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).26% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 78% are food insecure and 34% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).37% of clients served by The Food Bank of Corpus Christi report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).26% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).32% of households served by The Food Bank of Corpus Christi report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1).The Food Bank of Corpus Christi included approximately 120 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 118 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 88 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.73% of pantries, 24% of kitchens, and 25% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 71% of pantries, 50% of kitchens, and 71% of shelters of The Food Bank of Corpus Christi reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 90% of the food distributed by pantries, 31% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 30% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 84% of pantries, 54% of kitchens, and 50% of shelters in The Food Bank of Corpus Christi use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Hunger in America 2006 Local Report Prepared for The Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley

February 1, 2006

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2006, conducted for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 52,000 clients served by the A2H food bank network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 30,000 A2H agencies. The study summarized below focuses mainly on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the A2H network.Key Findings: The A2H system served by the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley provides food for an estimated 172,300 different people annually.24% of the members of households served by the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2). 31% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 73% are food insecure and 18% are experiencing hunger (Table 6.1.1). 20% of clients served by the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1). 19% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1). 17% of households served by the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1) The Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley included approximately 315 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 232 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 200 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter. 73% of pantries, 48% of kitchens, and 50% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1). 68% of pantries, 76% of kitchens, and 82% of shelters of the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley reported that there had been an increase since 2001 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for the agencies, accounting for 92% of the food used by pantries, 61% of kitchens' food, and 59% of shelters' food (Table 13.1.1). For the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley, 92% of pantries, 95% of kitchens, and 70% of shelters use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Hunger in America 2006 Local Report Prepared for The San Antonio Food Bank

February 1, 2006

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by the San Antonio Food Bank. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2006, conducted for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 52,000 clients served by the A2H food bank network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 30,000 A2H agencies. The study summarized below focuses mainly on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the A2H network.Key Findings: The A2H system served by the San Antonio Food Bank provides food for an estimated 147,000 different people annually. 27% of the members of households served by the San Antonio Food Bank are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2). 41% of client households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1). Among client households with children, 77% are food insecure and 32% are experiencing hunger (Table 6.1.1). 42% of clients served by the San Antonio Food Bank report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).36% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1). 46% of households served by the San Antonio Food Bank report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1) The San Antonio Food Bank included approximately 291 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 258 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 200 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter. 80% of pantries, 58% of kitchens, and 44% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1). 63% of pantries, 59% of kitchens, and 44% of shelters of the San Antonio Food Bank reported that there had been an increase since 2001 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1). Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for the agencies, accounting for 85% of the food used by pantries, 47% of kitchens' food, and 43% of shelters' food (Table 13.1.1). For the San Antonio Food Bank, 91% of pantries, 84% of kitchens, and 94% of shelters use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).