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Community Needs Assessment on Immigrant Bangladeshi Women’s Mental Health

February 23, 2022

This case summary conducted by the Urban Institute and Sapna NYC, a community-based organization serving low-income Bangladeshi women through health and empowerment programs, explores the findings of a community needs assessment focused on the mental health challenges and needs of Bangladeshi immigrant women living in the Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Brooklyn and can help inform practice and policy in New York City. Data from our interviews indicated that the three major contributing factors to the mental health of women in our study were economic and financial insecurity, home life and social networks, and traumatic events. Based on these insights, we propose recommendations for policymakers and funders to better support the mental health of vulnerable and immigrant communities.

HueArts NYC: Brown Paper

February 16, 2022

The HueArts NYC project was initiated by Museum Hue, The Laundromat Project, and Hester Street. They collectively conceptualized and designed it in response to the needs they experienced and observed in the arts sector; and then sought joint funding. The partners recognize the vast diversity of arts entities that focus on vast artistic mediums (visual arts, theater, literary arts, dance, art, music, film, and more). The result of this project is a digital map that begins to capture the arts entities and provides resources to support further conversation with philanthropy and other funders. We will continue to gather resources to include additional POC arts entities in the future.HueArts NYC is also a call to action. This community-informed brown paper offers findings from our research and clear recommendations for more indepth studies and funding to ensure the long-term stability and sustainability of arts entities founded and led by Black, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern, and all People of Color.

HueArts NYC Map & Directory

February 16, 2022

This project was initiated by Museum Hue, The Laundromat Project, and Hester Street. They collectively conceptualized and designed it in response to the needs they experienced and observed in the arts sector; and then sought joint funding. The partners recognize the vast diversity of arts entities that focus on vast artistic mediums (visual arts, theater, literary arts, dance, art, music, film, and more). The result of this project is this digital map that begins to capture the arts entities and provides resources to support further conversation with philanthropy and other funders. We will continue to gather resources to include additional POC arts entities in the future.

Celebrating Strengths, Addressing Needs: Community Driven Solutions To Improve Well-Being In Northern Manhattan

May 1, 2018

Northern Manhattan reflects the diversity and cultural richness of New York City as a whole, while also reflecting the city's challenges, including pockets of high poverty and the associated risks to child and family well-being. In this report, we focus on the community districts of West Harlem, Central Harlem, and Washington Heights, and where possible, provide data on the eight neighborhoods within these districts. Our findings suggest the neighborhoods of northern Manhattan each face unique challenges. Manhattanville in West Harlem struggles with the lowest levels of employment among adults and lowest average household income; Central Harlem has the highest rates of homelessness and most worrisome child and adult health outcomes; and Washington Heights faces high levels of linguistic isolation and low levels of adult educational attainment. Though specific neighborhoods have unique challenges, there are also issues that are universal across the neighborhoods of northern Manhattan. The poverty rate in each northern Manhattan neighborhood is higher than the citywide rate, and at schools in each neighborhood (with the exception of Morningside Heights in West Harlem) students perform well below the citywide level in state-mandated English Language Arts and Math exams. The data also point to areas in which there has been significant improvement in northern Manhattan. The uninsured rate for both children and adults has decreased substantially—faster than it has citywide—and only 1% of children in West Harlem and Washington Heights lack health insurance. The teen birth rate has dropped considerably in each district, at a faster rate than it has citywide. Poverty rates are higher—and average incomes are lower—in northern Manhattan compared to New York City as a whole. However, each northern Manhattan community district has experienced greater increases in average income—and larger decreases in poverty—than the city as a whole over the last several years. Amidst the good news is the troubling fact that children and families facing multiple risks to well-being are disproportionately black and Latino. Where possible, we identify disparities in outcomes for these and other demographic groups, such as immigrant and single-parent households. Findings from these analyses point to the stubbornness of unequal outcomes, and the persistent need to further expose and combat discrimination in all its forms. In our research, service providers and community members pointed to several issues that should be addressed to improve child and family well-being in northern Manhattan. For example, both caregivers and youth are seeking more opportunities that will allow them to be economically secure and upwardly mobile. Residents feel they need greater protections in maintaining stable housing, and they expressed a need to eliminate access barriers— including lack of information and language—to ensure greater ease and accessibility in obtaining needed and desired programs and services. There was a desire for a more equitable distribution of resources in schools and more opportunities for parental involvement in their children's education. And community members felt they could benefit from shared spaces and co-located services where multiple needs and interests can be addressed. Below, we further explore the major themes that arose in our research and provide broad, community-informed recommendations to address the issues raised.

Race and Prosecution in Manhattan

July 1, 2014

This report summarizes a two-year study which analyzed more than 200,000 cases. It focuses on the role of prosecutors during several points of a criminal case -- case acceptance for prosecution, dismissals, pretrial detention, plea bargaining, and sentencing recommendations -- and whether prosecutorial discretion contributes to racially and ethnically disparate outcomes. While the best predictors of case outcomes were factors that directly pertained to legal aspects of a case -- including the seriousness of the charge, the defendant's prior record, and the offense type -- the research also found that race remained a factor in case outcomes.

Tax Breaks for Billionaires: How the Campaign Finance System Failed New York Taxpayers and Helped Luxury Developers

June 5, 2013

In this report, the Metropolitan Council on Housing reviews what the luxury real-estate developers spent and what they received in return. We focus particularly on One57 because more data are available for that development. New construction in midtown Manhattan is ineligible for the 421-a tax subsidy unless the development includes on-site affordable units, which One57 and the other towers lacked. But the five developers wanted the tax breaks anyway. With their campaign contributions, developers of the five luxury towers had a goal: Get the legislature to let them take advantage of the 421-a program anyway, which would offer a substantial city tax break. Specifically, the legislature had to allow the five developments -- located at 99 Church Street, 520 Fifth Avenue, 157 West 57 Street, 109 Nassau Street and 78-86 Trinity Place -- to get the 421-a tax breaks even though the buildings would not normally be entitled to them. The reason Albany lawmakers agreed to spend millions subsidizing luxury housing for the wealthy is clear: developers who contributed to their campaigns called in chits and expected to be rewarded.