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Mapping and Analysis: New Hampshire’s Proposed U.S. House Districts Gerrymandering in the Granite State, Visualized

December 15, 2021

Last month, New Hampshire's Special House Committee on Redistricting released HB52, a bill proposing new Congressional district lines that substantively depart from the map that currently governs the selection of the state's US House delegation. In its current form, HB52 would cleave the current map into two non-competitive districts – a prospective District 1 highly favorable to Republican candidates and a District 2 heavily concentrated with Democratic voters.Elementary and straightforward calculations from publicly available 2020 Census population data and 2020 Presidential returns at the ward level show that the Majority's plan addresses the need for minor population reapportionment with a significant reshaping of New Hampshire's electoral map.Straightforward analysis indicates HB52 is consistent with a canonical "pack-and-crack" gerrymandering technique, wherein one district – ostensibly New Hampshire's District 2 in this case – is sacrificed, "packed" with the opponent's voters, with the aim of increasing the gerrymanderer's prospects in the other district – as is ostensibly the case with New Hampshire's prospective First District.

This Is Who We Are: New Hampshire Charitable Foundation 2020 Annual Report

July 21, 2021

Who we are is never more apparent than during times of crisis.In New Hampshire in 2020, we saw people run toward the public health emergency, putting themselves at risk to care for their neighbors. And we saw people angrily protest the public health measures proven to slow the spread of disease.We saw a new mobilization against and growing awareness of the systemic racism that has thrown up barriers in front of Black and brown people since before this republic was one. And we saw an ugly backlash — including threats of violence and a move to censor teaching about our shared history.Despite a global pandemic, we saw more people vote in a presidential election than had since 1964 — and we have become less likely to trust our neighbors.We saw promising new models of nonprofit news spring up to keep our communities informed — and we saw online echo chambers mutate with dangerous conspiracy fantasies.We saw people in the nonprofit sector roll up their sleeves and keep delivering on their missions during a time of sweeping illness and fear and uncertainty. We saw generous people come forward with resources when they were most desperately needed. We saw innovation, ingenuity and breathtaking courage and compassion. We saw heartbreak. And perseverance. And grace.Our communities face significant challenges ahead.Included in our 2020 annual report are 10 stories from a time of shared crisis that give us enduring hope.

Field Notes: Equity & State Climate Policy

September 5, 2019

For more than a decade, states and cities across the country have served a leadership role in advancing science-informed climate policy through city, state and multi-state efforts. The rapid pace by which state climate policy is emerging is evidenced by the number of new laws, directives and policies adopted in 2018 and the first half of 2019 alone. Currently, there is an active ongoing dialogue across the U.S. regarding the intersection of climate and equity objectives with efforts targeted at addressing needs of disadvantaged communities and consumers. This climate/equity intersection is due to several factors, including recognition by many cities and states that climate change is and will continue to have a disproportionate impact on certain populations and will exacerbate existing stressors faced by disadvantaged communities and consumers. Research indicates that a greater proportion of environmental burden exists in geographic areas with majority populations of people of color, low-income residents, and/or indigenous people. It is well known that certain households (including some that are low-income, African American, Latino, multi-family and rural) spend a larger portion on their income on home energy costs. States and stakeholders are realizing that a transition to a low-carbon future by mid-century will require significantly increased participation of disadvantaged communities and households in the benefits of climate and clean energy programs.

Half of Women in New Hampshire Have Experienced Sexual Harassment at Work

January 30, 2019

Sexual harassment in the workplace is a serious problem affecting workers across the United States and in New Hampshire. Nationwide, approximately four in ten women and more than one in ten men have been victims of workplace sexual harassment in their lifetimes. Research shows that such harassment has lasting economic, health, and family-related consequences for victims and their families: it increases victims' job exits and financial stress, alters career paths, and has deleterious consequences for mental and physical health, including depression, anger, and self-doubt

Facilitating Vulnerability and Power in New Hampshire Listen’s "Blue and You "

December 14, 2018

This study examines the on-going work of New Hampshire Listens, a convener of deliberative conversations, specific to their work with police-community relationships. Attending particularly to the facilitators and planners of New Hampshire "Blue and You" in a small city, the study found systemic practices of early stakeholder involvement in the planning, holding space for disparate views, promoting storytelling, and creating intimate physical spaces addressed the vulnerability felt by participants. These practices distributed power among stakeholders, aided in preparing participants for the conversation, and fostered neutrality in the forum. They provide several ideas for how deliberation practitioners and scholars might respond to the present polarizing political context.

More Young Adult Migrants Moving to New Hampshire from Other U.S. Locations

December 6, 2018

New Hampshire received a significant net inflow of people from other U.S. states between 2013 and 2017 according to new Census Bureau estimates. The average annual domestic migration gain was 5,900 between 2013 and 2017. In contrast, only about 100 more people moved to New Hampshire than left it for other U.S. destinations annually during the Great Recession and its aftermath between 2008 and 2012. The transformation was greatest among those in their 20s, who had an average annual migration gain of 1,200 between 2013 and 2017 compared to an average loss of 1,500 annually from 2008 to 2012. Among those in their 30s, the net annual migration gain nearly doubled during the same period, while the net inflow of those 40 to 49 diminished slightly. As more family age adults migrated to New Hampshire, their children fueled a significant increase in the net influx of those under age 20. In contrast, among those age 50 and over, the net outflow of people from the state increased slightly. Modest immigration from other countries at all ages supplemented the domestic migration gains analyzed here. These recent domestic and immigrant migration gains are both modest, but they provide additional human and social capital to a state challenged by an aging workforce and population.

The USDA Summer Food Service Program in Coös County, New Hampshire

October 30, 2018

When schools close in the summer, children who depend on school nutrition programs can lose accessto regular meals. To help bridge this gap, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) works with state agencies to identify sponsors and meal sites to provide free lunchesin the summer to eligible school-age children. This paper reports on the results of interviews withprogram sponsors and site staff in four communities in Coös County, New Hampshire. Discovering how thisprogram works on the ground and understanding the experiences of program sponsors and staff can help toinform efforts to serve eligible children.

Working Families’ Access to Early Childhood Education

September 5, 2018

New Hampshire's ocean coastline, though small relative to that of other states, is a place where people have lived, worked, and died for thousands of years. It is home to numerous important cultural heritage sites, and its identity is tied in tangible and intangible ways to centuries of marine-based ways of life. Tourism to the region's remnant historic heritage sites and cultural landscapes is a key factor in coastal New Hampshire's strong demographic, social, and economic growth. Rockingham and Strafford, the state's two coastal counties, accounted for $104.7 million, or well over a third (37.5 percent), of the state's meal and room tax revenue in fiscal year 2014.

Parental Substance Use in New Hampshire: Who Cares for the Children?

June 5, 2018

Hidden in the shadows of New Hampshire's opioid epidemic are the children who live with their parents' addiction every day. They fall behind in school as the trouble at home starts to dominate their lives, they make the 911 calls, they are shuttled about to live with relatives or in foster care, and they face an uncertain future when their parents can no longer care for them.

"Where do we go from here?" Identifying pathways toward inclusive community

May 3, 2018

This report presents results from a community conversation aimed at identifying pathways toward an inclusive and bias-free community. The conversation served as the closing community event of the Oyster River Community Read (ORCR) Program that ran from January to April 2018. The goal of this conversation was to increase understanding, generate ideas for change, and help participants getpersonally connected to next steps. The data are drawn from the transcriptions of the smaller groupdiscussions and from the evaluation forms administered at the end of the evening. Together, this information provides valuable insight into a highly contentious topic with no easy nor one immediate solution. The information included in this report presents community generated ideas that can inform decisions and support sustainable community efforts.

Climate Change, Sea-Level Rise, and the Vulnerable Cultural Heritage of Coastal New Hampshire

April 10, 2018

New Hampshire's ocean coastline, though small relative to that of other states, is a place where people have lived, worked, and died for thousands of years. It is home to numerous important cultural heritage sites, and its identity is tied in tangible and intangible ways to centuries of marine-based ways of life. Tourism to the region's remnant historic heritage sites and cultural landscapes is a key factor in coastal New Hampshire's strong demographic, social, and economic growth. Rockingham and Strafford, the state's two coastal counties, accounted for $104.7 million, or well over a third (37.5 percent), of the state's meal and room tax revenue in fiscal year 2014.

Data Snapshot: Millennials and Climate Change

March 13, 2018

From more frequent flooding to heat waves and drought, adverse impacts from climate change are already being experienced. Scientists warn of worse impacts within the lifetime of many people alive today, if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced. Although majorities in all age groups recognize the reality of climate change, awareness is highest among young adults.