Clear all

2,185 results found

reorder grid_view

Feeling the Pinch: Inflation and corporate consolidation

June 20, 2022

Prices are rising and Mainers are feeling the pinch. At the same time, some of the world's largest corporations are reporting record profits.The mismatch between Mainers feeling the pinch as corporate profits rise is the result of choices made by policymakers over time, particularly at the federal level, that have given corporations greater power over people to set prices and control the flow of goods and services. Now, corporations are using this power to extract even larger profits under the cover of current global supply chain disruptions.Prices on everyday items that we all rely on including meat, milk, bread, fuel, and electricity have gone up as much as 16 percent in the last year. That's well above the average increase in the costs of goods and services as a consequence of the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and changing consumer behavior. From April 2020 through December 2021, corporate profits accounted for 54 percent of each dollar increase in prices compared to just 11 percent on average during the 40 years prior to that period. As a result, corporate profits are the highest they've ever been since the late 1940s.Against this backdrop, policymakers must work to reduce corporate consolidation and power while also helping to buttress Mainers against ongoing price increases. 

Social Determinants of Immigrants’ Health in New York City: A Study of Six Neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens

June 15, 2022

More than 3.1 million immigrants reside in New York City, comprising more than a third of the city's total population. The boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens are home to nearly 940,000 and more than 1 million immigrants, respectively. According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's (DOHMH) Community Health Survey (CHS), foreign-born New Yorkers have poorer health and less access to healthcare than their US-born counterparts.For this study, the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) focused on six neighborhoods in these two boroughs whose immigrant residents were identified by a previous CMS study, Virgin and Warren (2021), as most at risk of poor health outcomes. The CMS research team conducted a survey of 492 immigrants across these six neighborhoods and convened one focus group to collect data on immigrants' health and well-being. CMS also surveyed 24 service providers including community health clinics, health-focused community-based organizations, and hospitals that work with immigrants in the studied neighborhoods. Analysis of these data, together with the US Census Bureau's American Community Survey and the DOHMH's CHS, provides insight into the factors that affect immigrants' health and wellbeing across these neighborhoods.

Opportunities to Improve Food Equity and Access in Massachusetts

June 3, 2022

This is GBFB's second annual Massachusetts statewide survey on food access.From December 2021 to February 2022, using an online survey company, GBFB surveyed more than 3,000 Massachusetts adults.The survey oversampled adults with lower incomes to ensure we heard from people most likely to need food assistance. Statistical weighting methods were used to collect estimates representative of the Massachusetts adult population.The survey was adapted from the National Food Access and COVID Research Team (NFACT) survey and modified to focus on issues related to food insecurity and food assistance use. GBFB modified the NFACT survey with input from statewide community partners including GBFB's Health and Research Advisory Council. 

Creating Safe and Vibrant Communities for All New Yorkers

June 2, 2022

Communities United for Police Reform (CPR) released its budget report, Creating Safe and Vibrant Communities for all New Yorkers, a community-driven rebuke of the mayor's proposed FY23 budget. Mayor Eric Adams' proposed budget has been heavily criticized and condemned by community members across the city for continuing regressive and failed policing patterns of the Giuliani and Bloomberg administrations and further bloating the NYPD budget while crucial community services receive comparatively microscopic investments. According to CPR's budget report, the mayor is proposing the largest-ever NYPD budget -- $11.2 billion, with minuscule investments in community-led violence prevention and intervention solutions that actually work.

Banking for the Public Good: Public Bank NYC

May 26, 2022

This case study is part of Demos' new Economic Democracy project, which asks how poor and working-class people, especially in Black and brown communities, can exercise greater control over the economic institutions that shape their lives. This framework has 3 goals:Break up and regulate new corporate power, including Amazon, Google, and Facebook.Expand the meaning of public goods and ensure that services are equitably and publicly administered.Strengthen "co-governance" strategies so that people and public agencies can collectively make decisions about the economy.With the accelerating frequency of climate disasters, it is especially important to build the power of those most impacted by disasters— often Black, brown, and Indigenous communities—to ensure they have equitable access to the resources needed to recover and move forward.This case study spotlights how the New Economy Project (NEP) launched the Public Bank NYC (PBNYC) campaign to build a public bank in New York City that is specifically configured to serve Black and brown communities. By shifting the focus of finance from private profits to the public welfare, public banks can begin to repair harms caused by longstanding discriminatory practices that have extracted wealth from Black and brown people and neighborhoods, like predatory lending, overdraft fees, and redlining.

In Their Own Words: Learning from NYIFUP Clients about the Value of Representation

May 24, 2022

Immigrants are part of the fabric of New York--one in three children in the state has an immigrant parent, more than 280,000 immigrants own businesses, and immigrants make up more than one quarter of the state's civilian workforce. Universal representation programs like the New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP) are one crucial component of building an immigration system that promotes fairness and respect and welcomes our immigrant neighbors. This brief features firsthand accounts from NYIFUP clients who were detained and fought, or are continuing to fight, their cases in New York immigration courts. Vera interviewed nine clients to learn about their experiences working with their immigration defense teams as well as the challenges they faced.

Climbing the Ladder: Roadblocks Faced by Immigrants in the New York City Construction Industry

May 23, 2022

As of 2021, immigrants comprised a larger share of the construction workforce than of any other sector in New York City (Office of the New York State Comptroller 2021). Between 2015 and 2019, immigrants comprised just 37 percent of the total New York City population, but 44 percent of the city's labor force and 63 percent of all its construction workers (Ruggles et al. 2021). The Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) estimates that in this time period, 41 percent of the immigrant construction workforce was undocumented.Economic exploitation and safety hazards are prevalent across the entire construction industry. However, despite the essential role immigrants play in the construction industry in New York City and the United States, immigrant construction workers are especially vulnerable to exploitation and dangerous conditions. Lack of employment authorization, social safety nets, English proficiency, credentials recognition, and training opportunities, as well as discrimination place immigrants at a stark disadvantage as they try to enter, negotiate, and advance in this industry. For this report, the CMS research team interviewed 16 immigrant construction workers from 10 countries and 10 other experts in this industry, including business representatives, union organizers, and representatives of community-based organizations (CBOs). Five of these representatives were immigrants and former construction workers. With research assistance from the New York-based consulting firm Locker Associates, Inc., CMS used these interviews, together with several other data sources, to examine how construction workers in New York City find employment, their work arrangements, and barriers and conditions that endanger their health, safety, and economic well-being.

The Economic Benefits of the Empire State Licensing Act: Immigrants in New York State’s Workforce

May 16, 2022

New research from the American Immigration Council highlights the crucial role of immigrants and refugees in New York's workforce, as well as the need to reduce barriers to professional and occupational licenses for all New York residents. New York law currently prohibits many immigrants from obtaining state occupational and professional licenses, certificates, and registrations solely due to their immigration status. The Empire State Licensing Act would remove such barriers, expanding economic opportunities to all residents and in the process, help meet the state's pressing workforce needs.

How the Child Tax Credit was spent in Maine

May 13, 2022

The improved and expanded monthly Child Tax Credit (CTC) has been one of the most successful and popular American Rescue Plan Act programs, providing flexibility to parents to buy food, make rent, afford child care, and other routine but essential family expenses. It dramatically lowered the number of U.S. children living in poverty -- and the ripple effect made our economy stronger by increasing spending in local economies and supporting jobs as families use the money to purchase food, pay bills, and cover school and childcare expenses.National studies confirm CTC payments succeeded in reducing adversity for kids and improving economic stability across the country. And in MECEP's report, How the Child Tax Credit was spent in Maine, we can now see specifically how it benefited Maine families as well.

Opportunity + Equity: A Time of Transformation

May 9, 2022

The two crisis years of the COVID-19 pandemic have brought dizzying changes, not only to how we all live and work but also to what we need to do to build the community of opportunity and equity that we envision.Great thinkers and leaders from Albert Einstein to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King have long emphasized that crisis can and must be the impetus for positive change. Surely, this is true of our time. In 2020-22, amidst tragic losses and glaringly revealed inequities, our deep social and racial divisions have been so inescapable as to lead many to commit to do more and to do things differently.This can be a time of transformation. Whether we all make it so here in Greater New Haven will determine much about the future of our community. For The Foundation, these last two yearshave been about transforming what we do and how we do it, both to continue to address the urgent needs and deep inequities stemming from COVID-19 and to more fully "inspire, support, inform, listen to and collaborate with the people and organizations of Greater New Haven" in the words of our mission statement.Transformation means many things at The Foundation. We are centering racial equity across all of our work. We are advancing economic as well as social solutions to the community's challenges. We are engaging community members more broadly and deeply, listening in new ways to those close to the issues we seek to address and empowering them with the authority and resources to act on their ideas.We are building a culture that embraces innovation so we can respond better to the rapidly changing dynamics in our community. The many ways in which these changes are reflected in our work are described throughout this annual report. At the same time, the pages that follow detail how The Foundation is building on our proud 94-year legacy of work with local donors and nonprofits, including receiving the largest gift in The Foundation's history this past year for the benefit of four vitally important local organizations.In addition to doing things differently, we are doing more. With the continuing extraordinary support of our donors and the unprecedented supplemental extraction from certain of our endowments under our Stepping Forward initiative, The Foundation will have an incremental $15 million in discretionary resources in 2021-23 to address the impacts of COVID-19 and to advance racial equity. Stepping Forward launched in early 2021. Its impact is reflected in all that is described in the pages of this annual report as well.In 2022, The Foundation is reviewing our plans and strategies and considering adjustments we may need to make in order to most effectively support meaningful transformation in our community going forward.As we do so, we see clear signs of genuine and important transformation. This annual report details three examples:While New Haven has long taken justifiable pride in the theatrical, musical, artistic and historic assets that make our area the cultural capital of Connecticut, the focus is shifting today. A movement to prioritize artists, creatives and different cultural traditions is beginning to transform how we think about our cultural life. Today, our community is increasingly about "cultural equity."A new generation of leadership voices is emerging in our community. Bringing diverse perspectives and new ideas about what equity really looks like, these changemakers are challenging traditional ways of thinking and beginning to set a new agenda.With New Haven growing and private investment increasing, the public/ private agenda in our community is increasingly focused on ensuring that the benefits of our growth are widely shared. "Inclusive growth" is beginning to replace "economic development" on the short list of our community's major priorities.

New Jersey Nonprofits: Trends and Outlook 2022

May 3, 2022

The New Jersey Center for Nonprofits conducted its annual survey of New Jersey nonprofits online from February 25-March 14, 2022 to assess how nonprofits fared in 2021 and to gauge their outlook for the coming year. This report is based on the 225 online responses from New Jersey 501(c)(3) organizations submitted during the survey period.Nonprofits overall have clearly experienced some key improvements since the worst of the pandemic in 2020. However, a number of significant challenges and opportunities remain.Demands for services and rising expenses are still outpacing funding – a longstanding problem with deep ramifications for delivery of programs and services in our communities.Nonprofits are struggling with significant workforce shortages that threaten their ability to meet community needs.Nonprofits also weighed in with their observations about the funding practices of their philanthropic partners, revealing significant opportunities to improve these vital relationships.Incorporating diversity and equity as a permanent and intentional part of all aspects of nonprofit work remains critically important.

Uncovering the Truth about Pennsylvania Crime Guns

April 27, 2022

Brady has used Pennsylvania's Gun Tracing Analytics Platform and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives' (ATF) listing of federal firearm licensees to uncover trends in crime gun trace data — finding that a small number of gun dealers in Pennsylvania appear to be responsible for a large portion of the crime guns recovered by law enforcement in the state.