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Report to the Women's Fund of Central Ohio: Economic Self-Sufficiency for Women in Central Ohio - Key Data and Concepts

March 19, 2014

To inform the work of The Women's Fund, a need was identified for data specific to the economic status of women in central Ohio. Beginning in the fall of 2013, to obtain this information The Women's Fund commissioned Illuminology to conduct research on this topic. By applying a gender lens to the issue of economic security, the financial status of women becomes clear. With this knowledge, together we can begin to create solutions as well as build on existing successes to address these issues as a community.

Benchmarking Central Ohio 2011

November 30, 2011

Benchmarking Central Ohio 2011 represents the fourth edition of the Benchmarking project, following upon previous reports released in March 2007, March 2008, and March 2009. Benchmarking is a process by which standardized, measurable indicators are used to track and assess how a community is doing in comparison to other communities across the state or nation. The report shows a mixed picture of the Columbus metro area, which ranks high in many economic and education indicators, but low in key indicators of personal prosperity and health. The report compares Central Ohio with 15 other metropolitan regions on 76 indicators in five broad areas: population vitality, economic strength, personal prosperity, community wellbeing, and lifelong learning. The 2011 report includes 18 new indicators and a companion spreadsheet with data for the 100 largest metro areas.

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for The Mid-Ohio FoodBank

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by The Mid-Ohio FoodBank. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network. Key Findings: The FA system served by The Mid-Ohio FoodBank provides emergency food for an estimated 248,500 different people annually.35% of the members of households served by The Mid-Ohio FoodBank are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).35% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 84% are food insecure and 43% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).57% of clients served by The Mid-Ohio FoodBank report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).41% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).32% of households served by The Mid-Ohio FoodBank report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1)The Mid-Ohio FoodBank included approximately 400 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 399 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 319 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.82% of pantries, 70% of kitchens, and 29% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 88% of pantries, 81% of kitchens, and 74% of shelters of The Mid-Ohio FoodBank reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 80% of the food distributed by pantries, 47% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 52% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 97% of pantries, 93% of kitchens, and 79% of shelters in The Mid- Ohio FoodBank use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network. Key Findings: The FA system served by The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio provides emergency food for an estimated 77,200 different people annually.41% of the members of households served by The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).32% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 79% are food insecure and 45% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).52% of clients served by The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).39% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).26% of households served by The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1)The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio included approximately 101 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 101 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 90 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.81% of pantries, 86% of kitchens, and 38% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 84% of pantries, 52% of kitchens, and 75% of shelters of The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 81% of the food distributed by pantries, 60% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 36% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 96% of pantries, 100% of kitchens, and 100% of shelters in The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Creative Columbus: A Picture of the Creative Economy of Central Ohio

June 12, 2009

Creative Columbus: a Picture of the Creative Economy of Central Ohio was released on June 12, 2009. The report, developed for the Columbus College of Art & Design by Community Research Partners, takes an in-depth look at central Ohio's creative services sector to determine its size, characteristics, magnitude, and direct economic value. Supporting funders of the project include the Columbus Foundation, Compete Columbus, the Franklin County Commissioners, the Greater Columbus Arts Council, and The Ohio State University.Creative Columbus is a unique project that studies both creative industries and occupations, drills down to the neighborhood level, and supplements these findings with primary data from a survey of a range of stakeholders in the creative economy. CRP used online networking sites and local blogs to generate awareness about the project. Offline, we had conversations with the creative community, whose support for this project providers impetus for future action.

Fair Housing Plan: Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio

July 1, 2008

This document describes how the City of Columbus and Franklin County will take steps to affirmatively further fair housing. The purpose of these actions is to ensure housing choice for all residents of Columbus and Franklin County by eliminating housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin.

Benchmarking Central Ohio 2008

March 1, 2008

On April 2, 2008 Benchmarking Central Ohio 2008 was released at a forum at the Columbus Metropolitan Club. The report assesses how the 8-county Columbus metropolitan area is doing, in comparison to 15 other metro areas, using a panel of 60 diverse indicators. The indicators focus on four broad areas -- population vitality, economic strength, personal prosperity, and community well-being -- each of which describes a facet of the community that contributes to economic competitiveness. The research was commissioned by The Columbus Partnership, a CEO organization of 30 top business and community leaders in central Ohio whose mission is to improve the economy of central Ohio and be a catalyst for growth in the region.

Hunger In America 2006 Local Report Prepared for The Mid-Ohio FoodBank

February 1, 2006

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by the Mid-Ohio FoodBank. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2006, conducted for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 52,000 clients served by the A2H food bank network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 30,000 A2H agencies. The study summarized below focuses mainly on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the A2H network. Key Findings: The A2H system served by the Mid-Ohio FoodBank provides food for anestimated 193,800 different people annually.38% of the members of households served by the Mid-Ohio FoodBank arechildren under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).32% of client households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among client households with children, 74% are food insecure and 31% areexperiencing hunger (Table 6.1.1).44% of clients served by the Mid-Ohio FoodBank report having to choose betweenpaying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).25% of clients had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).24% of households served by the Mid-Ohio FoodBank report having at least onehousehold member in poor health (Table 8.1.1)The Mid-Ohio FoodBank included approximately 419 agencies at theadministration of this survey, of which 400 have responded to the agency survey.Of the responding agencies, 285 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, orshelter.86% of pantries, 78% of kitchens, and 46% of shelters are run by faith-basedagencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religiousorganizations (Table 10.6.1).76% of pantries, 72% of kitchens, and 86% of shelters of the Mid-Ohio FoodBankreported that there had been an increase since 2001 in the number of clients whocome to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for the agencies,accounting for 80% of the food used by pantries, 48% of kitchens' food, and 53%of shelters' food (Table 13.1.1).For the Mid-Ohio FoodBank, 93% of pantries, 97% of kitchens, and 67% ofshelters use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).

Hunger in America 2006 Local Report Prepared for The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio

February 1, 2006

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2006, conducted for America's Second Harvest (A2H), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 52,000 clients served by the A2H food bank network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 30,000 A2H agencies. The study summarized below focuses mainly on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the A2H network.Key Findings: The A2H system served by the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio provides food for an estimated 33,000 different people annually. 28% of the members of households served by the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2). 30% of client households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among client households with children, 75% are food insecure and 42% are experiencing hunger (Table 6.1.1).39% of clients served by the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1). 30% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1). 30% of households served by the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1) The Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio included approximately 105 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 91 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 75 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter. 83% of pantries, 93% of kitchens, and 74% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1). 72% of pantries, 61% of kitchens, and 41% of shelters of the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio reported that there had been an increase since 2001 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1). Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for the agencies, accounting for 71% of the food used by pantries, 52% of kitchens' food, and 41% of shelters' food (Table 13.1.1). For the Second Harvest Food Bank of North Central Ohio, 96% of pantries, 96% of kitchens, and 100% of shelters use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).