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Seeing to Soar Regional Nonprofit Snapshot: Minneapolis-Saint Paul (Twin Cities)

April 26, 2022

This regional nonprofit snapshot is a follow-up analysis to Seeking to Soar, zooming in to better understand the AAPI nonprofit landscape in regions with AAPIP chapters, starting with Minneapolis-Saint Paul (Twin Cities).Key Findings:Although the Twin Cities has a robust philanthropic landscape (total grants nearing $1.3 billion), the slice designated to AAPI communities is miniscule, total just $5.3 million. This equates to just 42 cents going to AAPI communities per $100 awarded by institutional philanthropy.The majority of AAPI-specific organizations are small- to mid-sized. Nearly 90% are operating with less than five staff, and more than 80% are operating with budgets smaller than $500k.The funding landscape for AAPI-specific organizations is precarious. More than 75% of AAPI-designated funding comes from ten institutions. Investing long term and at higher levels is critical to building the capacity and sustainability of organizations that are foundational to AAPI communities.

Black Funding Denied: Community Foundation Support for Black Communities

August 1, 2020

In light of the national uprising sparked by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and building on other recent tragic movement moments going back to the 2014 murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri), NCRP is analyzing grantmaking by community foundations across the country to find out exactly how much they are – or are not – investing in Black communities.We started by looking at the latest available grantmaking data (2016-2018) of 25 community foundations (CFs) – from Los Angeles to New Orleans to New York City to St. Paul. These foundations represent a cross section of some of the country's largest community foundations as well as foundations in communities where NCRP has Black-led nonprofit allies.

Evaluation of Twin Cities Youth Social Entrepreneurship Programs: Results from a Point-in-Time Research Study of Eight YSE Programs

May 1, 2020

This report presents the results of a three-year research study on the impacts of YSE programs on youth. It includes eight YSE programs located in the Twin Cities metro area.

Otto Bremer Trust 2018 Annual Report

May 20, 2019

Otto Bremer Trust 2018 Annual Report.

Evaluation of Twin Cities Youth Social Entrepreneurship Programs: Results from a Point-in-Time Research Study of 11 YSE Programs, Funded by the Sundance Family Foundation

May 1, 2019

This report presents the results of a 24-month research study on the impacts of Youth Social Entrepreneurship programs on youth, including work readiness skills and interpersonal and social-emotional skills.

Intergenerational Impacts of Small Business Ownership: Findings from a Study of Businesses Supported by the Neighborhood Development Center

March 1, 2019

A study of the impacts of business ownership on owners' children, including changes regarding financial security, education, health, and career skills and interests.

Central Corridor Tracker: Progress Beyond Rail

January 31, 2018

The Central Corridor Funders Collaborative (2007 – 2016) was an innovative partnership supported by 14 local and national foundations seeking to create a "corridor of opportunity" along Minneapolis and Saint Paul's Green Line Light Rail Transit (LRT).

Patterns of Disparity: Small Business Lending in Fresno and Minneapolis-St. Paul Regions

November 2, 2017

The report examines the state of traditional bank small business lending in Fresno County, CA, and Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN. It offers policy and practice recommendations concerning the noted disparities in lending to businesses in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods and in communities of color. It is the fourth, and final, in a series of research reports examining small business owners' access to capital in eight major metropolitan areas.

Improving Early Literacy in PreK-3: Lessons Learned

August 23, 2016

In 2011, The McKnight Foundation partnered with a set of districts and schools in the Twin Cities area, all serving high-needs students, on a PreK–3 literacy initiative. The Pathway Schools Initiative aims to dramatically increase the number of students who reach the critical milestone of third-grade reading proficiency, an indicator predictive of later academic outcomes and high school graduation. This report focuses on findings from Phase I of the Pathway Schools Initiative (2011–2015).The McKnight Foundation selected the Urban Education Institute (UEI) at the University of Chicago to serve as the initiative's intermediary. UEI was tasked with providing the intellectual, conceptual, and managerial leadership for the initiative as well as professional development and technical assistance focused on literacy and leadership to the Pathway districts and schools. UEI anchored this support on two, validated diagnostic tools developed at the University of Chicago: the Strategic Teaching and Evaluation of Progress (STEP) developmental literacy assessment and the 5Essentials Survey.Participating Pathway schools and districts carried out the day-to-day work of the initiative. They used grant funds to expand or refine their PreK programs; hire additional staff such as program managers, literacy coaches, classroom aides, and family engagement liaisons; and purchase high-quality instructional materials, such as classroom libraries or tablets.An advisory group, the Education and Learning National Advisory Committee (ELNAC), was established in 2010 to help inform decisions about the initiative. SRI International has served as the initiative's evaluator since 2010.

About Community, Not a Commute: Investing Beyond the Rail

June 22, 2016

The Central Corridor Funders Collaborative (2007 – 2016) was an innovative partnership supported by 14 local and national foundations seeking to create a "corridor of opportunity" along Minneapolis and Saint Paul's Green Line Light Rail Transit (LRT). The Funders Collaborative supplemented the programs and grantmaking of its member foundations by working with community organizations, the business sector, and public agencies to encourage collaboration, planning, and investment beyond the rail. The Green Line opened in June 2014, and the Funders Collaborative concluded its work two years later in June 2016 as planned.

Connecting the Dots: Data Use in Afterschool Systems

May 31, 2016

Afterschool programs are seen as a way to keep low-income children safe and to foster the skills needed to succeed in school and life. Many cities are creating afterschool systems to ensure that such programs are high-quality and widely available. One way to do so is to ensure afterschool systems develop and maintain a data system.This interim report presents early findings from a study of how afterschool systems build their capacity to understand and improve their practices through their data systems. It examines afterschool data systems in nine cities that are part of The Wallace Foundation's Next Generation Afterschool System-Building initiative, a multi-year effort to strengthen systems that support access to and participation in high-quality afterschool programs for low-income youth. The cities are Baltimore, Md., Denver, Colo., Fort Worth, Texas, Grand Rapids, Mich., Jacksonville, Fla.,Louisville, Ky., Nashville, Tenn., Philadelphia, Pa., and Saint Paul, Minn.To date, research on data use in afterschool systems has focused more on the implementation of technology than on what it takes to develop and sustain effective data use. This study found that the factors that either enabled or hampered the use of data in afterschool systems—such as norms and routines, partner relationships, leadership and coordination, and technical knowledge—had as much to do with the people and process components of the systems as with the technology.Strategies that appear to contribute to success include:    Starting small. A number of cities intentionally started with a limited set of goals for data collection and use, and/or a limited set of providers piloting a new data system, with plans to scale up gradually.    Ongoing training. Stakeholders learned that high staff turnover required ongoing introductory trainings to help new hires use management information systems and data. Providing coaching and developing manuals also helped to mitigate the effects of turnover and to further the development of more experienced and engaged staff.    Outside help. Systems varied in how they used the expertise of outside research partners. Some cities identified a research partner who participated in all phases of the development of their data systems. Others used the relationship primarily to help analyze and report data collected by providers. Still others did not engage external research partner, but identified internal staff to support the system. In any of these scenarios, dedicated staffers with skills in data analytics were key.

How Boston and Other American Cities Support and Sustain the Arts: Funding for Cultural Nonprofits in Boston and 10 Other Metropolitan Centers

January 21, 2016

A new study commissioned by the Boston Foundation on how Boston and comparable cities support the arts shows that only New York City has higher per capita contributed revenue for the art than Boston, among major American cities.The study, titled "How Boston and Other American Cities Support and Sustain the Arts: Funding for Cultural Nonprofits in Boston and 10 Other Metropolitan Cities," also examined Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Philadelphia, Portland Oregon, San Francisco, and Seattle. "How Boston" is a follow-up of sorts to a 2003 Boston Foundation report titled, "Funding for Cultural Organizations in Boston and Nine Other Metropolitan Areas."Key findings of this study, regarding Boston, include the fact that Boston's arts market is quite densely populated. While Greater Boston is the nation's 10th largest metro area and ranks ninth for total Gross Domestic Product, its non-profit arts market, which consists of more than 1,500 organizations, is comparable to that of New York and San Francisco, and consistently surpasses large cities such as Houston, Chicago and Philadelphia, in terms of the number of organizations and their per capita expenses.