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A Qualitative Evaluation of Advances in Emergency Department Opioid Use Disorder Care in Michigan

January 10, 2023

The United States opioid epidemic claims the lives of tens of thousands of Americans each year due to opioid overdose. Hospital emergency departments (EDs) have been essential in combatting the crisis by stabilizing patients who are experiencing an overdose and other symptoms of their opioid use disorders (OUD). Over time, EDs have also become more involved in providing other addiction treatment services, such as prescribing and administering medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) and referring their patients to outpatient behavioral health care providers for follow-up treatment. Policymakers have been essential in driving EDs to expand the scope of their addiction medicine services and referrals by creating specialized programs that provide incentivizes to participating hospitals.The following report summarizes advances in opioid use disorder care within EDs in 19 hospitals across 8 health systems in Michigan. These hospitals participated in an initiative created by the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan (CFSEM) in collaboration with the Michigan Opioid Partnership (MOP), a public-private collaborative with a mission to reduce opioid overdoses in Michigan by improving the access and quality of prevention, treatment, harm reduction, and recovery services. The initiative was supported by State Opioid Response grants from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Vital Strategies, a global public health organization that helps governments strengthen public health, provided support, technical assistance, and resources to improve hospital coordination and designed the evaluation. Specifically, hospitals were provided funding by CFSEM to improve OUD care training, coordination, delivery, and quality in their EDs. Hospitals and health systems funded by CFSEM included the University of Michigan Health System (Michigan Medicine hospital), Trinity Health (Mercy Health Muskegon, Mercy Health St. Mary, St. Joseph Mercy - Ann Arbor, St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea, St. Joseph Mercy Livingston, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland), Henry Ford Health Systems (Henry Ford – Main, Henry Ford - Wynadotte/ Brownstown), Beaumont Health Systems (Beaumont - Royal Oak, Beaumont – Troy, Beaumont – Wayne), Ascension (Ascension St. John Hospital, Ascension Genesys Hospital), Munson Healthcare (Munson Medical Center - Traverse City, Sparrow Health System (Sparrow Hospital - Lansing), Spectrum Health (Spectrum Health Butterworth), War Memorial, and Hurley Medical Center. After receiving funding, hospitals created work plans related to improving opioid use disorder care in their EDs, including by increasing their number of employed X-waivered providers, integrating clinical tracking and support tools into electronic medical records, and connecting patients with behavioral health care providers in the community to establish treatment continuity (i.e., "warm handoffs"). Researchers with the Bloomberg Overdose Prevention Initiative at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health evaluated hospital improvement in these areas using surveys and qualitative interviews with participants.

The Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan 2021 Yearbook

July 14, 2021

The Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan promotes positive change in the region. The Yearbook is our annual report on grants, donors, volunteers and the work being done to improve the lives of everyone who lives, works and plays in southeast Michigan.

Here for Each Other: 2020 Annual Report

April 1, 2021

This report was written and published by the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation.

The Perils and Promise of America's Legacy Cities in the Pandemic Era

August 12, 2020

COVID-19's devastating impact is likely to be more severe and long-lasting in "legacy cities," or older industrial cities, like Detroit, especially for minority communities. But promising, new collaborative local efforts and leadership—particularly if they are shored up by key policy fixes—can make a difference in whether and how legacy cities recover from the crisis and emerge stronger on the other side.This report was published by the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings with support, in part, by the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation.

Cybersecurity Emerging Technology Skills Gap Analysis

April 1, 2020

This report is focused on cybersecurity and will analyze the current and emerging technology workforce in southeast Michigan. Where appropriate, national comparisons are included as well. This report builds upon and updates the original Cybersecurity Skills Gap Analysis published by WIN in 2017 in connection with the Office of Economic Adjustment, Department of Defense.This report was published by the Workforce Intelligence Network with support by the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation.

Connected and Automated Vehicles Emerging Technology Skills Gap Analysis

April 1, 2020

This report is focused on connected and automated vehicles (CAV) and will analyze the current and emerging technology workforce in southeast Michigan. It examines occupations that are critical in developing CAV by analyzing data on the workforce's employment trends, local demand, entry requirements, and regional specialties.This report was published by the Workforce Intelligence Network with support by the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation.

Growing Stronger Together: 2019 Annual Report

April 1, 2020

View the 2019 Annual Report for the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation. The report covers highlights of the foundation's 2019 programmatic grant commitments made in its two regions of Southeast Michigan and Western New York, spotlights on the Foundation's special initiatives, and the Foundation's 2019 audited financials.This report was written and published by the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation.

Report of Activities: 2016-2018

April 1, 2019

This is the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation's first official "Report of Activities" to the community. The report offers listings of the Foundation's 2016, 2017 and 2018 programmatic grant commitments made in its two regions of Southeast Michigan and Western New York. The report also includes the Foundation's 2017 audited financials.

An Exploration of Family Caregiving

September 1, 2017

To gain a better understanding of the "state of family caregiving," the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation engaged Practica Group, a partnership of anthropologists and marketers, to conduct research and gain broad cultural insight into the everyday lives of this growing community. By presenting these findings, the Foundation strives to provide fresh perspectives on the life of caregivers, the challenges they face, their successes and joys.This publication was researched by Practica Group with support from the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation.

State of Play Southeast Michigan

June 1, 2017

This report offers an independent assessment of the state of play for kids and sports in the seven-county region comprising Southeast Michigan—Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, Livingston, Monroe, and St. Clair counties. It is anchored in the notion that all stakeholders will benefit if all children in the region, regardless of zip code or ability, are provided access to a quality sport experience.The report was produced by the Aspen Institute's Sports & Society Program with support from the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation, in partnership with the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan.

Hunger in America 2010 Local Report Prepared for Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest

February 1, 2010

This report presents information on the clients and agencies served by Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest. The information is drawn from a national study, Hunger in America 2010, conducted in 2009 for Feeding America (FA) (formerly America's Second Harvest), the nation's largest organization of emergency food providers. The national study is based on completed in-person interviews with more than 62,000 clients served by the FA national network, as well as on completed questionnaires from more than 37,000 FA agencies. The study summarized below focuses on emergency food providers and their clients who are supplied with food by food banks in the FA network. Key Findings: The FA system served by Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest provides emergency food for an estimated 489,700 different people annually.39% of the members of households served by Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest are children under 18 years old (Table 5.3.2).34% of households include at least one employed adult (Table 5.7.1).Among households with children, 73% are food insecure and 31% are food insecure with very low food security (Table 6.1.1.1).41% of clients served by Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel (Table 6.5.1).24% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care (Table 6.5.1).18% of households served by Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest report having at least one household member in poor health (Table 8.1.1)Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest included approximately 448 agencies at the administration of this survey, of which 424 have responded to the agency survey. Of the responding agencies, 292 had at least one food pantry, soup kitchen, or shelter.81% of pantries, 69% of kitchens, and 48% of shelters are run by faith-based agencies affiliated with churches, mosques, synagogues, and other religious organizations (Table 10.6.1).Among programs that existed in 2006, 83% of pantries, 75% of kitchens, and 50% of shelters of Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites (Table 10.8.1).Food banks are by far the single most important source of food for agencies with emergency food providers, accounting for 79% of the food distributed by pantries, 49% of the food distributed by kitchens, and 48% of the food distributed by shelters (Table 13.1.1).As many as 95% of pantries, 92% of kitchens, and 87% of shelters in Gleaners Community FB of SE Michigan and Forgotten Harvest use volunteers (Table 13.2.1).