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Impact of COVID-19 on the BAME community and voluntary sector: Final report of the research conducted between 19 March and 4 April 2020

April 1, 2020

This report provides the results of two waves of surveys, which were conducted between 19 – 23 March (Wave 1) and between 27 March and 4 April (Wave 2). From these two phases, we received 182 responses from organisations and individuals, which represented 165 different organisations. The surveys focused particularly on the impact of COVID-19 on the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) organisations who deliver services to the Bame communities and covered:Awareness and concerns of COVID-19Impact on the individual: initial and subsequent impact as the crisis worsenedFinancial impact on organisationsImpact on service delivery and organisational preparednessSupport and development needsThe survey confirmed some areas of general concerns within the charity, community and voluntary sector but also flagged up some areas of concerns that seem to be particular to BAME organisations.

An Inequality Commissioner for London

April 5, 2016

London is the UK's richest city and a driver of its economy, but also home to the country's greatest extremes of poverty and wealth. Around 2.3m people live below the poverty line in London - 27 percent of its population, compared with 20 percent in the rest of England. The mayoralty of London is one of the most important public positions in the UK. It has the potential to tackle inequality, and can be an authoritative voice about policies that the national government should apply specifically to London.Oxfam is calling on the next Mayor of London to be at the forefront of efforts to address poverty and inequality. Specifically, Oxfam is calling for the appointment of an Inequality Commissioner for London, with a remit to:Develop a strategy to address economic inequalities and povertyDevelop a 'decent work standard'Consider the role of London's financial sector in relation to global inequalities

BP1 / LLV Impacts + Beyond: Briefing on London 2012 Olympic Games, v5 2015

January 1, 2016

Games Monitor is a network of people with a desire to inform and monitor the Olympic process and the local impact. Final editions of Background papers 1, 2 & 3 were updated December 2015. Version 5 replaces previous versions of background papers and is an extensive revision.

BP2 / Finance, profit + infrastructure: Briefing on London 2012 Olympic Games, v5 2015

January 1, 2016

Games Monitor is a network of people with a desire to inform and monitor the Olympic process and the local impact. Final editions of Background papers 1, 2 & 3 were updated December 2015. Version 5 replaces previous versions of background papers and is an extensive revision.

BP3 / Apparatus (State + Media): Briefing on London 2012 Olympic Games

January 1, 2016

Games Monitor is a network of people with a desire to inform and monitor the Olympic process and the local impact. Final editions of Background papers 1, 2 & 3 were updated December 2015.

Get Young People Working - The Youth Offer, Final Evaluation Report

November 1, 2015

Get Young People Working – The Youth Offer is a £3.28m two-year programme funded by City Bridge Trust (CBT). Grants have been made to London's 32 Local Authorities (LAs) with the aim of helping 1,000 young people across the capital not in Employment Education and Training (NEET) gain employment, an apprenticeship or vocational training. The intention of the programme has been to increase their employability, adding value to existing programmes and contributing to an evidence base of what works for this group. Every London LA was awarded a grant of up to £100,000, with the freedom to decide on the most appropriate spend in the light of local circumstances. The only condition was that the LAs worked in partnership with one or more Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) organisation(s) to deliver the projects. The outcomes achieved exceeded the target, set for itself by City Bridge Trust, with 2,522 participants moving into full-time employment education or training and 214 into part-time education or employment. The individual projects were valued by participants, with a high level of satisfaction among those interviewed or surveyed.

Circular Economy Snapshot: BMW Drivenow

May 7, 2015

BMW's views of the future of car ownership influenced its decision to enter the car-sharing business. DriveNow estimates that an average car is used only about 4% of the time and with half the global population predicted to live in cities by 2050 and parking becoming ever more difficult, urban residents are increasingly looking for alternatives to ownership. Observing that in cities that have embraced car-sharing a single such vehicle has the potential to replace dozens of cars, the company determined it needed to be in the car-sharing sector. It also allows BMW to access customers it normally has trouble reaching, as the average age of the company's buyer is in their mid-40s but the average age of a car sharing user is 32. Younger generations are not as attached to car ownership and continue to make multi-modal choices in transportation.While in the past BMW Group was in the business of selling cars, by the year 2020 it has a vision to be the world's leading provider of premium vehicles and premium services for individual mobility – where cars are provided as a mobility service. The company is equally seeking to make mobility climate-friendly and easy on resources, and has been increasingly combining its car-sharing offers with electric drivetrain solutions which generate zero emissions.Their newest electric vehicle model (i3) incorporates recycled and eco-friendly materials and is being introduced to DriveNow customers.

Building Bridges: London Borough of Waltham Forest

December 11, 2014

This report provides a grassroots perspective on integration and cohesion in the London borough of Waltham Forest. The research focuses on the relationships between the area's different racial, religious, and cultural communities. In particular, it offers insight into the attitudes and opinions of British white working class communities and British Muslims living in the borough.The findings suggest that Waltham Forest's residents embrace its multicultural nature despite the paucity of governmental policies in support of integration. Low-income white and Muslim communities both viewed Waltham Forest as home and expressed commitment to making diversity work locally.White working class groups interviewed in this study feel marginalized and ignored. They were not part of the local authority cohesion debates even though they have strong family and friendship links with different communities. In addition, despite the reality of multiculturalism and diversity, British Muslim participants recounted experiences of racism. Many were critical of some of the established leaders and faith-based organizations in the community, and felt that the extremist perspectives of the few made it easier for the media and politicians to stigmatize Muslims in the UK.The report offers a select number of recommendations building on successful local initiatives in Waltham Forest. It puts forward a proposal to develop a community hub to organize development activities, plan informal events, and provide a space to discuss issues of extremism and other difficult topics.This research builds on the previous Open Society Foundations reports Muslims in London and Europe's White Working Class Communities.

Somalis in London

October 9, 2014

Somalis in London explores the views and experiences of Somali communities living in London, focusing on six areas of local policy—employment, education, housing, health and social protection, political participation, and policing and security—as well as broader themes of belonging and identity and the role of the media. The report uses the term "British Somali" to capture the lived experiences of being from one country (Somalia) and of another (the United Kingdom).British Somalis living in the United Kingdom are one of the largest and longest established communities in Europe. Somalis in London focuses on the boroughs of Camden and Tower Hamlets because of the nature and size of their British Somali population.Somalis in London is part of a seven-city research series titled Somalis in European Cities, by the Open Society Foundations' At Home in Europe project, which examines the realities of people from Somali backgrounds in Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Malmo, Leicester, London, and Oslo.

Somalis in London: Executive Summary

October 9, 2014

Somalis in London explores the views and experiences of Somali communities living in London, focusing on six areas of local policy—employment, education, housing, health and social protection, political participation, and policing and security—as well as broader themes of belonging and identity and the role of the media. The report uses the term "British Somali" to capture the lived experiences of being from one country (Somalia) and of another (the United Kingdom).British Somalis living in the United Kingdom are one of the largest and longest established communities in Europe. Somalis in London focuses on the boroughs of Camden and Tower Hamlets because of the nature and size of their British Somali population.Somalis in London is part of a seven-city research series titled Somalis in European Cities, by the Open Society Foundations' At Home in Europe project, which examines the realities of people from Somali backgrounds in Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Malmo, Leicester, London, and Oslo.

Muslims in London

July 1, 2012

"I have grown up here so I believe it is my place. I don't feel that I am an outsider. This is my country. I had my education here and I am very pleased that I am a British Muslim."—Focus group respondentMuslims in London highlights the complexities around belonging and identity amongst Muslim and non-Muslim residents living in Waltham Forest, one of London's 2012 Olympic boroughs. The research reveals that that local not national identity is strongest for Muslims in Waltham Forest.  The situation is exactly the reverse for non-Muslims in the borough, who feel a stronger attachment to Britain than their neighbourhood.The research offers the most up to date insight on how Muslims in one of London's most diverse boroughs really feel about where they live and what's stopping them from feeling they belong in Britain.By engaging with communities and policymakers, local experts heading the research explored the primary concerns of Muslim residents in Waltham Forest.  Issues addressed include education, employment, health, housing and social protection, citizenship and political participation, policing and security, media, belonging and identity.The report acts on its findings by offering a series of recommendations for local and national authorities, Muslim communities and other minority groups, NGOs and community organizations, the media, and broader civil society.Muslims in London is the tenth report in the Muslims in EU Cities series produced by the Open Society Foundations At Home in Europe Project. It is the result of research that examines the level and nature of integration of Muslims in 11 cities across Europe (Antwerp, Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Hamburg, Leicester, London, Marseille, Paris, Rotterdam, and Stockholm).

Muslims in London Findings and Recommendations

July 1, 2012

"I have grown up here so I believe it is my place. I don't feel that I am an outsider. This is my country. I had my education here and I am very pleased that I am a British Muslim."—Focus group respondentMuslims in London highlights the complexities around belonging and identity amongst Muslim and non-Muslim residents living in Waltham Forest, one of London's 2012 Olympic boroughs. The research reveals that that local not national identity is strongest for Muslims in Waltham Forest.  The situation is exactly the reverse for non-Muslims in the borough, who feel a stronger attachment to Britain than their neighbourhood.The research offers the most up to date insight on how Muslims in one of London's most diverse boroughs really feel about where they live and what's stopping them from feeling they belong in Britain.By engaging with communities and policymakers, local experts heading the research explored the primary concerns of Muslim residents in Waltham Forest.  Issues addressed include education, employment, health, housing and social protection, citizenship and political participation, policing and security, media, belonging and identity.The report acts on its findings by offering a series of recommendations for local and national authorities, Muslim communities and other minority groups, NGOs and community organizations, the media, and broader civil society.Muslims in London is the tenth report in the Muslims in EU Cities series produced by the Open Society Foundations At Home in Europe Project. It is the result of research that examines the level and nature of integration of Muslims in 11 cities across Europe (Antwerp, Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Hamburg, Leicester, London, Marseille, Paris, Rotterdam, and Stockholm).