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How Foundations Listen : A Qualitative Review by Luisa Bonin

March 23, 2023

This report is the result of a partnership between Philea and Luisa Bonin, a visiting fellow from Brazil at the Maecenata Foundation in Berlin. Luisa`s project on strategic philanthropy was selected for the 2021/2022 cohort of the "German Chancellor Fellowship for Prospective Leaders," a programme of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The goal of this report is to take a deep and qualitative look into the listening practices of European foundations. Talking about listening can sound subjective, but this report shows how this process can be viewed objectively and how these learnings can be used to start improving listening practices within foundations. An executive summary, as well as further reading and resources, are included.

“This Is Why We Became Activists”: Violence Against Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women and Non-Binary People

February 14, 2023

According to interviews Human Rights Watch conducted with 66 lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ+) activists, researchers, lawyers, and movement leaders in 26 countries between March and September 2022, forced marriage is one of ten key areas of human rights abuses most affecting LBQ+ women's lives. Human Rights Watch identified the following areas of LBQ+ rights as those in need of immediate investigation, advocacy, and policy reform. This report explores how the denial of LBQ+ people's rights in these ten areas impacts their lives and harms their ability to exercise and enjoy the advancement of more traditionally recognized LGBT rights and women's rights:the right to free and full consent to marriage;land, housing, and property rights;freedom from violence based on gender expression;freedom from violence and discrimination at work;freedom of movement and the right to appear in public without fear of violence;parental rights and the right to create a family;the right to asylum;the right to health, including services for sexual, reproductive, and mental health;protection and recognition as human rights defenders; andaccess to justice.This investigation sought to analyze how and in what circumstances the rights of LBQ+ people are violated, centering LBQ+ identity as the primary modality for inclusion in the report. Gender-nonconforming, non-binary, and transgender people who identify as LBQ+ were naturally included. At the same time, a key finding of the report is that the fixed categories "cisgender" and "transgender" are ill-suited for documenting LBQ+ rights violations, movements, and struggles for justice. As will be seen in this report, people assigned female at birth bear the weight of highly gendered expectations which include marrying and having children with cisgender men, and are punished in a wide range of ways for failing or refusing to meet these expectations. Many LBQ+ people intentionally decenter cisgender men from their personal, romantic, sexual, and economic lives. In this way, the identity LBQ+ itself is a transgression of gendered norms. Whether or not an LBQ+ person identifies as transgender as it is popularly conceptualized, the rigidly binary (and often violently enforced) gender boundaries outside of which LBQ+ people already live, regardless of their gender identity, may help to explain why the allegedly clear division between "cisgender" and "transgender" categories simply does not work for many LBQ+ communities. This report aims to explore and uplift, rather than deny, that reality.

European Philanthropy at the Nexus of Disability and the SDGs

December 1, 2019

This publication, jointly elaborated by Fundación ONCE and the European Foundation Centre, focused on how the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals are serving as a framework for foundations to develop their action on disability inclusion. The publication includes key reflections on this topic as well as examples and testimonies of eleven relevant foundations from nine countries -France, UK, Italy, Spain, Austria, Ireland, Netherlands, Turkey and Georgia. The publication has been developed in the framework of Disability Hub Europe, an initiative led by Fundación ONCE with the co-funding of the European Social Fund.

Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe: Monitoring 2019

August 1, 2019

Presently, the culture of open discussion seems to be threatened in an increasing number of countries. In Central and Eastern Europe's (CEE's) democracies, recent political developments appear to jeopardize progresses made in the past. Against this background, this study aims at shedding light on the dynamics of CEE'scivil society and gives a brief overview of the status quo and recent developments that directly affect civil society. The study was conducted by the Competence Center for Nonprofit Organizations and Social Entrepreneurship at WU Vienna (Vienna University of Economics and Business), commissioned by and in collaboration with ERSTE foundation as well as with a group of country experts. The inclusion of expert assessments on civil society aims at giving a voice primarily to practitioners. Therefore, the study included an online survey in each participating country, addressing CSO representatives operating in various fields of activity.

Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe: Challenges and Opportunities

March 1, 2017

More than two decades have passed since nonprofit and third-sector researchers "discovered" Central and Eastern Europe as an area of scholarly interest. After the collapse of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe and the fall of the Iron Curtain, scholars noted the emergence of new civil society actors and were curious to understand the role these actors would play in their societies. Since that time, Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) has experienced intensive periods of transformation, conflict and renewal. This study is guided by the intention to develop a better understanding of the current state of civil society in Central and Eastern Europe, the diverse pathways of its development, and its possible future trajectories.

From Refugees to Workers : Mapping Labour-Market Integration Support Measures for Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Eu Member States - Volume I: Comparative Analysis and Policy Findings

October 1, 2016

This study intends to provide a better understanding of the challenges with regard to the integration of refugees into the labour-markets. What are the strategies and practices implemented in different EU Member States to facilitate access to employment? What do we know about their effectiveness? What are good practices and lessons learned in different countries? The study includes detailed case studies for the following nine EU Member States: Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The research points to the need for increased coordination at all levels, the conditions for successful public-private partnerships, and the adequate sequence of work integration and language learning, for example. Not least, it makes clear that finding effective ways to bring refugees to work will prove key for Europe's future.It has been produced by the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) at the European University Institute in Florence.Search also for: Volume II "Literature Review and Country Case Studies".

From Refugees to Workers: Mapping Labour-Market Integration Support Measures for Asylum Seekers and Refugees in EU Member States - Volume II: Literature Review and Country Case Studies

October 1, 2016

This study intends to provide a better understanding of the challenges with regard to the integration of refugees into the labour-markets. What are the strategies and practices implemented in different EU Member States to facilitate access to employment? What do we know about their effectiveness? What are good practices and lessons learned in different countries? The study includes detailed case studies for the following nine EU Member States: Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The research points to the need for increased coordination at all levels, the conditions for successful public-private partnerships, and the adequate sequence of work integration and language learning, for example. Not least, it makes clear that finding effective ways to bring refugees to work will prove key for Europe's future.It has been produced by the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) at the European University Institute in Florence.Search also for: Volume I of the report "Comparative Analysis and Policy Findings".

EUFORI Study: European Foundations for Research and Innovation (Synthesis Report)

July 1, 2015

This report provides a thorough and comprehensive analysis of the contributions that foundations make to support research and innovation in EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland. Over the last 25 years, the role of foundations as supporters of research and innovation in Europe has grown significantly in scope and scale. However, the landscape is fragmented and, till now, largely uncharted. Little is known about the vast majority of such foundations, their activities or even their number, and information about their real impact on research and innovation in Europe was very limited. A team of national experts in the EU 27 (and Norway and Switzerland), led by VU University Amsterdam, has therefore been commissioned by the European Commission to study foundations' contribution to research and innovation in the EU under the name EUFORI. This study helps fill this knowledge gap by analysing foundations' financial contributions, and provides useful insights into the different ways they operate. It also identifies emerging trends and the potential for exploring synergies and collaboration between foundations, research-funding agencies, businesses and research institutes.

Circular Economy Snapshot: BMW Drivenow

May 7, 2015

BMW's views of the future of car ownership influenced its decision to enter the car-sharing business. DriveNow estimates that an average car is used only about 4% of the time and with half the global population predicted to live in cities by 2050 and parking becoming ever more difficult, urban residents are increasingly looking for alternatives to ownership. Observing that in cities that have embraced car-sharing a single such vehicle has the potential to replace dozens of cars, the company determined it needed to be in the car-sharing sector. It also allows BMW to access customers it normally has trouble reaching, as the average age of the company's buyer is in their mid-40s but the average age of a car sharing user is 32. Younger generations are not as attached to car ownership and continue to make multi-modal choices in transportation.While in the past BMW Group was in the business of selling cars, by the year 2020 it has a vision to be the world's leading provider of premium vehicles and premium services for individual mobility – where cars are provided as a mobility service. The company is equally seeking to make mobility climate-friendly and easy on resources, and has been increasingly combining its car-sharing offers with electric drivetrain solutions which generate zero emissions.Their newest electric vehicle model (i3) incorporates recycled and eco-friendly materials and is being introduced to DriveNow customers.

Breaking Down Grant Making Silos: Disability as a Cross-Programme Initiative

April 1, 2015

Increasingly, foundations talk about ways of breaking down silos in their grant making approaches in order to step away from the single-issue focus to improve effectiveness and to achieve long lasting solutions to deep rooted problems. In this framework, the effort of many foundations that are taking action to breaking down those silos by developing joint grants across different priority areas is remarkable. This publication's main aim is to communicate these greatest efforts to provide a source of reflection and inspiration for foundations. Since we are working in a systemic framework, it would be ineffective to address disability without acknowledging its relationships with gender equality, education, employment, ageing, research, cooperation and development.This booklet aims also to demonstrate through a solution-based approach, the broadness of foundational programs in the field of disability that also have a clear focus on social innovation. The best practices showcased show how foundations consider disability a cross-cutting and inclusive issue, integrating it into programs that reach out not only persons with disabilities but connect them with very different fields of civil society. This practical tool can serve as an inspiration for other foundations to act taking into consideration the cross-cutting approach.

Comparative Highlights of Foundation Laws: The Operating Environment for Foundations in Europe 2015 (Chinese Translation)

January 1, 2015

This publication aims to provide the reader with a comparative overview of the diverse legal and fiscal environments of foundations in 40 countries across wider Europe: the 28 EU Member States, plus Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Montenegro, Norway, Russia, Serbia, Switzerland, Turkey, and Ukraine. It includes charts, draw on the basis of the updated online EFC (European Foundation Centre) Legal and Fiscal Country Profiles, which are available to download at www.efc.be. The EFC online profiles include more detailed country information and further explanation of the information presented in those charts. (Edition translated from English to Chinese)

Fiscal Impact of EU Migrants in Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK

November 12, 2014

This study was undertaken to estimate some aspects of the net fiscal impact of EU migrants in four EU countries Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The report outlines the role of Fiscal Impact of EU Migrants in Selected Countries migrants from EU countries as participants in the labour market, as taxpayers and as benefit recipients also. The fiscal contribution of EU foreigners has increased substantially in the past several years. Compared to 2009, inn 2013 EU migrants paid 31% more in direct taxes as their wages increased and more EU workers found employment opportunities in Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. As migration accelerated, EU foreigners also paid 44% more on indirect taxes, as they spent more onconsumer purchases. EU foreigners in Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK received 35% more benefits than they did in 2009, due to the overall expansion of the welfare state in addition to the inflow of EU migrants.