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Taking the Pulse of the European Foundation Sector : Moving from Proving Impact to Improving Impact

January 1, 2022

This report contains key insights, survey data and case studies from the first year of the European and Spanish Communities of Practice on Impact Measurement and Management (IMM), coordinated by the Esade Center for Social Impact with the support of BBK. These groups of foundation professionals from 15 countries have come together to increase the level of transparency, knowledge-sharing and exchange within the European foundation sector on this topic. Building on the transcribed discussions and surveys of approximately 40 European foundations, the authors have developed several learnings they hope will help the whole European foundation sector, as well as any other organizations that want to measure and manage their impact. In this perspective, the report also includes tables outlining what the different 'levels' of practice might be, so that the reader can understand what the impact management learning journey looks like at different stages (beginner, on the journey, and advanced).In addition to the present report, the following page provides links to the recording of the launch of the report as well as presentation slides: https://www.esade.edu/en/faculty-and-research/research/knowledge-units/center-social-impact/research/community-practice 

Responding to the ECEC Needs of Children of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe and North America

April 1, 2018

This report explores the findings of a nine-country study of ECEC policies and practices designed to serve young children of refugees and asylum seekers. It draws on fieldwork conducted in Belgium, Canada, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, Turkey, and the United States—major host countries with varied refugee and asylum-seeker populations, migration-management policies, and ECEC systems—to highlights both common challenges and promising practices.

Midlife Cardiovascular Fitness and Dementia

March 14, 2018

Objective: To investigate whether greater cardiovascular fitness in midlife is associated with decreased dementia risk in women followed up for 44 years.Methods: A population-based sample of 1,462 women 38 to 60 years of age was examined in 1968. Of these, a systematic subsample comprising 191 women completed a stepwise-increased maximal ergometer cycling test to evaluate cardiovascular fitness. Subsequent examinations of dementia incidence were done in 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, 2005, and 2009. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria on the basis of information from neuropsychiatric examinations, informant interviews, hospital records, and registry data up to 2012. Cox regressions were performed with adjustment for socioeconomic, lifestyle, and medical confounders.Results: Compared with medium fitness, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause dementia during the 44-year follow-up was 0.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03–0.54) among those with high fitness and 1.41 (95% CI 0.72–2.79) among those with low fitness. High fitness delayed age dementia onset by 9.5 years and time to dementia onset by 5 years compared to medium fitness.Conclusions: Among Swedish women, a high cardiovascular fitness in midlife was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent dementia. Promotion of a high cardiovascular fitness may be included in strategies to mitigate or prevent dementia. Findings are not causal, and future research needs to focus on whether improved fitness could have positive effects on dementia risk and when during the life course a high cardiovascular fitness is most important.

Foundations and the Ambiguity of Success and Failure : A Case Collection

October 1, 2016

The Hertie School releases its findings from an international research project "Foundation Successes and Failures: Implications for Policy and Management – Developing a Case studies Repertoire". Professor Helmut K. Anheier led the research project, which was made possible by the Robert Bosch Foundation. The project looks at 20 case studies of philanthropic foundations from a range of fields in seven countries including Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom. The primary intended purpose is to be used by foundation boards, foundation staff training and executive education. The vignettes may also serve teaching purposes at university master level programs, particularly in public policy and business schools. For example, several will become teaching cases at the Harvard Business School.One major conclusion based on the collection of case studies is that 'success' and 'failure' are not as clear cut as it would appear. Any claims of failure or success should be approached with caution, and there are no simple solutions for high impact results or maximized philanthropic contributions. Despite ambiguity, planning and performance measures are better than none at all. A fuller analysis will be forthcoming as a book in 2017 published by Helmut K. Anheier and Diana Leat (London: Routledge).

From Refugees to Workers : Mapping Labour-Market Integration Support Measures for Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Eu Member States - Volume I: Comparative Analysis and Policy Findings

October 1, 2016

This study intends to provide a better understanding of the challenges with regard to the integration of refugees into the labour-markets. What are the strategies and practices implemented in different EU Member States to facilitate access to employment? What do we know about their effectiveness? What are good practices and lessons learned in different countries? The study includes detailed case studies for the following nine EU Member States: Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The research points to the need for increased coordination at all levels, the conditions for successful public-private partnerships, and the adequate sequence of work integration and language learning, for example. Not least, it makes clear that finding effective ways to bring refugees to work will prove key for Europe's future.It has been produced by the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) at the European University Institute in Florence.Search also for: Volume II "Literature Review and Country Case Studies".

From Refugees to Workers: Mapping Labour-Market Integration Support Measures for Asylum Seekers and Refugees in EU Member States - Volume II: Literature Review and Country Case Studies

October 1, 2016

This study intends to provide a better understanding of the challenges with regard to the integration of refugees into the labour-markets. What are the strategies and practices implemented in different EU Member States to facilitate access to employment? What do we know about their effectiveness? What are good practices and lessons learned in different countries? The study includes detailed case studies for the following nine EU Member States: Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The research points to the need for increased coordination at all levels, the conditions for successful public-private partnerships, and the adequate sequence of work integration and language learning, for example. Not least, it makes clear that finding effective ways to bring refugees to work will prove key for Europe's future.It has been produced by the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) at the European University Institute in Florence.Search also for: Volume I of the report "Comparative Analysis and Policy Findings".

Drivers of Maternity Care in High-income Countries: Can Health Systems Support Woman-centred Care?

September 15, 2016

In high-income countries, medical interventions to address the known risks associated with pregnancy and birth have been largely successful and have resulted in very low levels of maternal and neonatal mortality. In this Series paper, we present the main care delivery models, with case studies of the USA and Sweden, and examine the main drivers of these models. Although nearly all births are attended by a skilled birth attendant and are in an institution, practice, cadre, facility size, and place of birth vary widely; for example, births occur in homes, birth centres, midwifery-led birthing units in hospitals, and in high intervention hospital birthing facilities. Not all care is evidenced-based, and some care provision may be harmful. Fear prevails among subsets of women and providers. In some settings, medical liability costs are enormous, human resource shortages are common, and costs of providing care can be very high. New challenges linked to alteration of epidemiology, such as obesity and older age during pregnancy, are also present. Data are often not readily available to inform policy and practice in a timely way and surveillance requires greater attention and investment. Outcomes are not equitable, and disadvantaged segments of the population face access issues and substantially elevated risks. At the same time, examples of excellence and progress exist, from clinical interventions to models of care and practice. Labourists (who provide care for all the facility's women for labour and delivery) are discussed as a potential solution. Quality and safety factors are informed by women's experiences, as well as medical evidence. Progress requires the ability to normalise birth for most women, with integrated services available if complications develop. We also discuss mechanisms to improve quality of care and highlight areas where research can address knowledge gaps with potential for impact. Evaluation of models that provide woman-centred care and the best outcomes without high costs is required to provide an impetus for change.

International Profiles of Health Care Systems, 2015

January 21, 2016

This publication presents overviews of the health care systems of Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Each overview covers health insurance, public and private financing, health system organization and governance, health care quality and coordination, disparities, efficiency and integration, use of information technology and evidence-based practice, cost containment, and recent reforms and innovations. In addition, summary tables provide data on a number of key health system characteristics and performance indicators, including overall health care spending, hospital spending and utilization, health care access, patient safety, care coordination, chronic care management, disease prevention, capacity for quality improvement, and public views.

RN Role Reimagined: How Empowering Registered Nurses Can Improve Primary Care

August 11, 2015

With growing demands on primary care and a shortage of primary care clinicians, safety-net clinics are asking, What is the role of the registered nurse (RN) in primary care?This report describes how 11 community health centers and county health systems in California, as well as two health centers outside California, are using the following strategies to expand the RN role in primary care:Provide RNs with additional training in primary care skills, so they can make more clinical decisions.Empower RNs to make more clinical decisions, using standardized procedures.Reduce the triage burden on RNs to free up time for other responsibilities.Include RNs on care teams, allowing them to focus on their team's patients.Implement RN-led new-patient visits to increase patient access to care.Offer patients co-visits in which RNs conduct most of the visit, with providers joining in at the end.Deploy RNs as "tactical nurses."Provide patients with RN-led chronic care management visits.Employ RNs' skills to care-manage patients with complex health care needs.Train some RNs to take responsibility for specialized functions.Schedule RNs to perform different roles on different days.Preserve the traditional RN role and focus on training medical assistants (MAs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to take on new responsibilities.

EUFORI Study: European Foundations for Research and Innovation (Synthesis Report)

July 1, 2015

This report provides a thorough and comprehensive analysis of the contributions that foundations make to support research and innovation in EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland. Over the last 25 years, the role of foundations as supporters of research and innovation in Europe has grown significantly in scope and scale. However, the landscape is fragmented and, till now, largely uncharted. Little is known about the vast majority of such foundations, their activities or even their number, and information about their real impact on research and innovation in Europe was very limited. A team of national experts in the EU 27 (and Norway and Switzerland), led by VU University Amsterdam, has therefore been commissioned by the European Commission to study foundations' contribution to research and innovation in the EU under the name EUFORI. This study helps fill this knowledge gap by analysing foundations' financial contributions, and provides useful insights into the different ways they operate. It also identifies emerging trends and the potential for exploring synergies and collaboration between foundations, research-funding agencies, businesses and research institutes.

White Working Class Communities in Lyon: French

June 4, 2015

This report is part of a six-city research series, Europe's White Working Class Communities, which examines the realities of people from majority populations in Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm.White Working Class Communities in Lyon explores the views and experiences of the majority population in the 8th arrondissement (borough) of Lyon, a diverse and dense area, and socially and economically one of the most challenged areas in the city. Given that in France it is not permitted to define people based on ethnic or racial characteristics, and it is very difficult to talk explicitly about ethnicity, the term "majority population" was used as an open category to recruit focus groups' participants. This study is the largest, and to our knowledge, only empirical study on the majority population that has been conducted in France.Lyon is considered to be a role model in France for working actively on inclusion and cohesion issues. This report analyzes six areas of its local policy—education, employment, housing, health and social protection, policing and security, and civil and political and participation—as well as broader themes of belonging and identity and the role of the media.The findings, permeated by a changing socio-economic environment and anxiety over perceived and real differences, are complex. For instance, residents felt their French identity was under pressure but had strong local identities. Likewise, they had serious hardships in different areas and felt they were ignored by the state and the media but were also generally positive about their future and did not feel particularly disempowered.White Working Class Communities in Lyon is part of a six-city series by the Open Society Foundations' At Home in Europe project providing groundbreaking research on the realities of a section of the population whose lives are often caricatured and whose voices are rarely heard in public debates on integration, social cohesion, and social inclusion. Through a comparative lens, the project seeks to highlight parallels and differences in policies, practices and experiences across the European cities of Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm.

White Working Class Communities in Lyon

June 4, 2015

This report is part of a six-city research series, Europe's White Working Class Communities, which examines the realities of people from majority populations in Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm.White Working Class Communities in Lyon explores the views and experiences of the majority population in the 8th arrondissement (borough) of Lyon, a diverse and dense area, and socially and economically one of the most challenged areas in the city. Given that in France it is not permitted to define people based on ethnic or racial characteristics, and it is very difficult to talk explicitly about ethnicity, the term "majority population" was used as an open category to recruit focus groups' participants. This study is the largest, and to our knowledge, only empirical study on the majority population that has been conducted in France.Lyon is considered to be a role model in France for working actively on inclusion and cohesion issues. This report analyzes six areas of its local policy—education, employment, housing, health and social protection, policing and security, and civil and political and participation—as well as broader themes of belonging and identity and the role of the media.The findings, permeated by a changing socio-economic environment and anxiety over perceived and real differences, are complex. For instance, residents felt their French identity was under pressure but had strong local identities. Likewise, they had serious hardships in different areas and felt they were ignored by the state and the media but were also generally positive about their future and did not feel particularly disempowered.White Working Class Communities in Lyon is part of a six-city series by the Open Society Foundations' At Home in Europe project providing groundbreaking research on the realities of a section of the population whose lives are often caricatured and whose voices are rarely heard in public debates on integration, social cohesion, and social inclusion. Through a comparative lens, the project seeks to highlight parallels and differences in policies, practices and experiences across the European cities of Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm.