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Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Moldova Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Ukraine Response - Three Month Update

May 25, 2022

In the last three months, we have provided more than 2.9 million people in Ukraine, Poland and Moldova with critically needed supplies and health servicesSupporting 33 health facilities and 17 refugee and internally displaced persons (IDP) centersDelivered 212 tons of medical consumables and pharmaceuticals, such as antibiotics and medicines for noncommunicable diseases, pediatric patients and surgery and traumaProcured and distributed nearly 16,000 health, hygiene, protection and COVID-19 testing kitsTrained nearly 370 first responders on topics including PFA and psychosocial support servicesConducted 2,977 health consultationsConducted 307 MHPSS consultations 

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #14

May 12, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 14 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 7,256 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,496 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In Ukraine, conflict remains concentrated in eastern and southern regions. According to OCHA, before 2022 eastern Ukraine was among the most minecontaminated regions in the world. Since the invasion, the State Emergency Service (SES) of Ukraine has disposed of more than 102,000 explosive devices and more than 1,900 aerial bombs. The Interior Minister announced the launch of the International Coordination Centre for Humanitarian Demining, which SES will work in collaboration with, to reduce casualties from explosive remnants of war.Since the invasion, almost 6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 12, at least 3,251,955 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 889,674 had entered Romania, 458,242 had entered Moldova, 577,820 had entered Hungary and 406,833 had entered Slovakia, while 772,121 had entered Russia and 27,108 had entered Belarus. According to Poland's Office for Foreigners, more than 1 million Ukrainian nationals--47% of whom are children--have registered for a national PESEL number, allowing them to access services such as health and social support.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #13

May 5, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 13 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 6,635 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,238 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In addition to widespread conflict in the southeast, Russian attacks have targeted Ukrainian infrastructure throughout the country, in an attempt to thwart efforts from the west to provide Ukrainians with weapons and supplies. Recent missile strikes on railway stations caused damage to the stations, as well as to surrounding infrastructure, but the impact of the attacks is not expected to have a significant impact on the ability to deliver aid.Since the invasion, more than 5.7 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 5, at least 3,119,196 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 854,292 had entered Romania, 450,797 had entered Moldova, 545,311 had entered Hungary and 388,282 had entered Slovakia, while 714,713 had entered Russia and 25,852 had entered Belarus.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #12

April 28, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 12 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 5,840 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 2,729 killed.Now, two months since the conflict began, 24 million people are estimated to be in need of humanitarian assistance. The most recent needs assessment conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) reveals that one in three Ukrainian households have at least one person with a chronic disease who is unable to easily access healthcare. Such challenges are expected to be exacerbated as the conflict continues.Since the invasion, more than 5.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 28, at least 2,944,164 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 783,420 had entered Romania, 437,362 had entered Moldova, 502,142 had entered Hungary and 360,458 had entered Slovakia, while 627,512 had entered Russia and 24,719 had entered Belarus.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #14

April 22, 2022

The conflict in Ukraine has now displaced 7.1 million Ukrainians to date. The most pressing needs among this population are cash and financial support, transportation, food, shelter, and hygiene items. Many are also in need of medicines and health services. The humanitarian conditions for those who remain in their homes are also severe: Over 1.4 million people are without running water in Eastern Ukraine and an additional 1.6 million across the country are in immediate risk of losing their access. Many others face significant protection, food, and health risks.Project HOPE's support to health facilities and IDPs in Ukraine continues to scale up in response to the overwhelming needs. We are establishing focus on three hubs of support in West Ukraine, East Ukraine, and the Kyiv area with potential expansion to Odessa and Kherson and other areas as security allows.We have also imported more than 150 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.We are also establishing a trauma care training model to roll out to medical professionals on the front lines.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #13

April 15, 2022

Project HOPE continues to scale up operations in Eastern Europe to respond to the ongoing humanitarian crisis. Our teams in Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Ukraine bring technical knowledge on health, mental health, protection, and other sectors with considerable field experience, and a strong relationship with local and international actors to forge a targeted and comprehensive response.This week, more than 7,900 doses of insulin reached Project HOPE's warehouse in Lviv and are now en route to Kharkiv. Project HOPE has imported more than 100 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to six hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.In Moldova, Project HOPE has procured more than 300 wheelchairs to be distributed to a local organization serving Ukrainian refugees. We also continue to support  SAMU's Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) to serve refugees crossing the Ukraine/Moldova border as per the request of the WHO and Moldovan Ministry of Health. The most prevalent diagnoses have included hypertension, upper respiratory infections, and acute mental health issues.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #10

April 14, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the crisis began, at least 4,521 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 1,932 killed, with actual numbers likely much higher.Attacks continue on the cities of Kharkiv and Mariupol, with shelling also reported in Luhansk, Kharkiv, Donetsk and southern Kherson oblasts. The situation in Mariupol remains catastrophic, with 130,000 people still trapped in the city. Though the security situation in northern Ukraine is reportedly improving, 96,000 people across the east are still without electricity, and water has been cut off in Popasna, Rubizhne and Sievierodonetsk. Many people trapped in affected areas face security risks, a lack of information on where to find accommodation and safety, and a lack of basic needs such as food, water and medicines.The State Emergency Service of Ukraine (SESU) reports that nearly half of Ukraine requires de-mining as a result of the invasion. The Department of Pyrotechnic Works and Humanitarian Demining is removing and neutralizing 2,000 to 6,000 explosive devices each day. The mines and other explosive devices, including unexploded ordinance and IEDs left by the Russians, pose a serious risk to civilians and increased need for emergency and traumarelated health supplies.Since the invasion, more than 4.6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 14, at least 2,669,637 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 709,219 had entered Romania, 415,850 had entered Moldova, 434,342 had entered Hungary, 323,020 had entered Slovakia, 433,083 had entered Russia and 21,852 had entered Belarus.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #9

April 7, 2022

On February 24, Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered a "special military operation" in Ukraine, leading to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. In the six weeks of continued attacks, at least 3,838 civilian casualties have been reported in Ukraine, including 1,611 killed, though the UN has said that numbers are likely much higher.Within Ukraine, there are currently more than 400 sites dedicated to internally displaced persons (IDPs), with more than 200,000 IDPs accommodated. Many of the Ukrainians that remain internally displaced are without resources. Among IDPs, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) and protection needs are highest. Nearly 96,000 facilities in the country remain without electricity and 132,000 without gas. Access to water has been completely cut off for a number of communities in eastern Ukraine.At this stage in the response, resources are becoming scarce, particularly products and services that have been exhausted during the more than six weeks of response. Hospitals remain in constant need of essential medical equipment and supplies, as supply-chain constraints continue. Healthcare workers are strained, continuing to treat high-acuity patients while dealing with staff shortages. Humanitarian organizations are prioritizing the capacity building of health facilities and providers, to sustain the response and equip the health system with the supplies, services and skills needed.Since the invasion, more than 4.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 7, at least 2,514,504 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 662,751 had entered Romania, 401,704 had entered Moldova, 404,021 had entered Hungary, 304,983 had entered Slovakia, 350,632 had fled to Russia and 18,060 had fled to Belarus.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #12

April 5, 2022

Project HOPE is partnering with a non-governmental organization in Ukraine to purchase and transport pharmaceuticals and medical supplies across the country. This coming week, Project HOPE is transporting 100 pallets of pharmaceuticals and supplies, including insulin, needles, sutures, and gauzes into Lviv for onward distribution into the country. Our team on the ground is also conducting assessments of health facilities to determine needs and how Project HOPE and partners can best fulfill gaps.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #8

March 31, 2022

On February 24, Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered a "special military operation" in Ukraine, leading to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the crisis began, at least 3,090 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 1,189 killed.In the five weeks since the invasion, there have been 82 confirmed attacks on healthcare facilities, as well as personnel, transport and warehouses. The destruction to Ukraine infrastructure has surpassed $119 billion in losses, including damage or destruction to nearly 8,000 kilometers of roads, railroads and rail stations, and airports. More than 831,000 Ukrainians remain without electricity, and 6 million have limited to no access to safe water.Though various oblasts throughout Ukraine have experienced devastating damage and losses, Mariupol remains the sole city that remains inaccessible to humanitarian aid. Access issues and security threats continue to prevent humanitarian convoys from delivering aid to the city, despite efforts to reach civilians for more than a month.Since the invasion, more than 4 million people have fled Ukraine. As of March 31, at least 2,336,799 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 608,936 had entered Romania, 387,151 had entered Moldova, 364,804 had entered Hungary, 281,172 had entered Slovakia, 350,632 had fled to Russia and 10,902 had fled to Belarus.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #11

March 31, 2022

In response to the ongoing crisis, Project HOPE has strategically placed teams in Ukraine and the three largest refugee recipient countries: Moldova, Poland, and Romania. Project HOPE is partnering with actors on the ground—including government officials, local relief organizations, and INGOs—to provide critical relief to conflict-affected populations on both sides of Ukraine's borders.In Ukraine, Project HOPE is importing 47 pallets of hygiene kits, vitamins, and medical supplies in Lviv for onward distribution. These items are expected in Ukraine early next and week will be delivered westward by Project HOPE's partner in Ukraine.