Clear all

235 results found

reorder grid_view

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #17

June 24, 2022

International Medical Corps, which has a history in Ukraine stretching back to 1999, has been operating continuously in the country since 2014, when we began providing medical, mental health and protection services, and infection prevention and control (IPC) programs in response to the conflict in the southeast. Following the Russian invasion in February 2022, we expanded our operations throughout the country, with programs in health, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS), protection, gender-based violence (GBV), nutrition, food security and livelihoods, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).International Medical Corps currently has operations in Chernihiv, Dnipro, Kyiv, Lviv, Odesa and Vinnytsia. From these operational hubs, International Medical Corps also provides material support in the way of food, non-food items (NFIs), and medical supplies and equipment to Donetsk, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv. 

Attacks on Hospitals from Syria to Ukraine: Improving Prevention and Accountability Mechanisms

June 14, 2022

When Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022, it soon began implementing one of its frequent--and criminal--tactics that it had already been using in its military intervention in Syria: bombing healthcare and medical facilities. Syrian government forces first began targeting health workers in Syria in 2011 at the start of the Syria crisis, and Russia joined them in targeting the healthcare system upon its official entrance to the conflict in 2015. Over the course of the conflict, over 90 percent of 601 recorded attacks on medical facilities were attributable to either Syrian or Russian forces. In Ukraine, Russia has reportedly perpetrated more than 200 attacks on healthcare facilities and ambulances since the start of the invasion. The well-documented pattern of targeted attacks on healthcare in Syria and Ukraine undermines long-established and hard-won provisions under international humanitarian law intended to protect civilians during conflict. Despite the scale of the problem, which extends beyond Syria and Ukraine, there has been no prominent criminal prosecution of any alleged perpetrators of attacks on healthcare in any conflict, no establishment of a UN mandate dedicated to this issue, and no task force created by national governments specifically aimed at prevention of and accountability for these crimes. The international community's failure to compel meaningful action to stop the criminal practice of targeting healthcare in conflict after conflict has resulted in continued deaths of health workers and civilian populations.In a new issue brief by the Atlantic Council Strategic Litigation Project's Elise Baker and Gissou Nia, the two propose recommendations to UN bodies, the World Health Organization, national governments and other institutions and decision makers for concrete actions to prevent future attacks and advance accountability for past ones.

“Anyone can die at any time”: Indiscriminate attacks by Russian forces in Kharkiv, Ukraine

June 13, 2022

From the beginning of their invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, Russian forces launched a relentless campaign of indiscriminate bombardments against Kharkiv, Ukraine's second-biggest city. They shelled residential neighbourhoods almost daily, killing and injuring hundreds of civilians and causing wholesale destruction, often using widely banned cluster munitions.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #16

June 9, 2022

International Medical Corps, which has a history in Ukraine stretching back to 1999, has been operating continuously since 2014, when we began providing medical, mental health and protection services, and infection prevention and control programs in response to the conflict in the southeast. Following the Russian invasion in February 2022, International Medical Corps expanded our operations throughout the country, with programs in health, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS), protection, nutrition, food security and livelihoods, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)International Medical Corps currently has operations in Chernihiv, Dnipro, Kyiv, Lviv, Odessa and Vinnytsia. From these operational hubs, International Medical Corps also provides material support in the way of food, non-food items (NFIs), and medical supplies and equipment to Donetsk, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv.International Medical Corps is providing context-based programming based on the security, access and needs that have been brought about by the invasion. In each context, we are approaching our emergency response in a tailored way to meet the specific needs of the people.In liberated zones, we are focusing on stabilization and recovery efforts. Our response philosophy is to rehabilitate, repair and support the healthcare system, ensure access to emerging MHPSS, protection and WASH needs, and ensure that the local population has access to such basic such as food, shelter, water and cash. In high-risk zones, we are focused on preparation measures ensuring that the healthcare and social systems are resilient to any shocks if and when conflict occurs. We are also focused on providing services to internally displaced persons (IDPs) and residents. In accessible zones, International Medical Corps is focused on ensuring the safety and well-being of IDPs in the region. 

Documentation and Benefit Eligibility for Ukrainians

June 8, 2022

Since the start of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the number of Ukrainians seeking safety in the United States has rapidly risen. This fact sheet outlines the three main legal pathways and their corresponding benefit eligibility, that Ukrainians are utilizing in the United States. These include 1) Temporary Protected Status (TPS); 2) Humanitarian Parole and the Uniting for Ukraine Program; and 3) the Lautenberg Program.

At Risk and in Need: Recommendations To Help The Most Vulnerable People Displaced From Ukraine

June 8, 2022

The war in Ukraine has led to the largest refugee crisis in Europe since World War II, and one of the fastest large-scale displacements in history.The international community has provided an unprecedented level of support to people fleeing Ukraine, but despite this response, vulnerable populations are at risk.In this policy brief HIAS examines the serious protection risks that certain groups -- women and girls; unaccompanied and separated children; LGBTQ individuals; people with disabilities; and non-Ukrainian refugees, asylum seekers, and stateless persons -- are experiencing. HIAS recommends ways the EU, U.S., and UN agencies can address these gaps, including funding local civil society organizations and increasing efforts to combat trafficking, exploitation, and abuse.

Charity in times of war

June 6, 2022

The full-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine in one way or another has significantly affected all life processes in the country. The charity and civil society were no exception and were among the first mechanisms that managed to quickly mobilize and adapt their work to the challenges of wartime.In the short period since February 24, many changes have taken place in the field of charity. Many new volunteer, community-based and charitable organizations and initiatives have been established. The existing organizations changed the focus of their main activity. At the same time, there is an unprecedented increase in the number of donations and support for the sector.In addition to the changes, there are a number of challenges faced by representatives of Ukrainian charity – including logistical difficulties, loss of staff due to evacuation, inability to continue ongoing projects or consolidate efforts and resources to implement statutory activities due to a general change in priorities.However, all changes and developments should be thoroughly systematized and verified to assess their feasibility and scale. Consistent research and relevant data enable choosing the most appropriate strategy for working with the sector, which certainly needs support.Keeping our hands on the pulse of Ukrainian philanthropy, we at Zagoriy Foundation decided to conduct a qualitative study of the sector during the full-scale war to identify and describe the main changes and trends and contribute to effective development and support of the sector.

How Best (Not) to Address the Ukraine Crisis

June 6, 2022

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has disrupted global wheat, corn, and other markets. Given relatively low global stocks for major staple foodstuffs, many analysts predict that food insecurity will increase among poor households in low-income countries. Understandably, many world leaders, including the Biden administration, are concerned about how to best address a potential global hunger crisis. However, in the rush to "do something," leaders need to consider the most efficient policies to address the crisis and avoid ill-considered policies that may do little to address the actual problems and could result in unintended consequences that may linger well past the crisis itself.The most effective way of addressing global food supply concerns would be an immediate end to the war and rebuilding critical infrastructures such as rail lines, storage facilities, and port facilities to allow Ukraine's agricultural sector access to global markets. To that end, the UN secretary general's efforts to end the blockade of Ukraine grain shipping and support the establishment of a blue corridor by sea or a green corridor overland to move foodstuffs from Ukraine should be supported. Unfortunately, the likelihood of a quick end to the war looks increasingly faint, and Russia has given no signs that it would consider granting safe passage of Ukraine food exports through the Black Sea.The Biden administration has recently put forward a set of proposals aimed at increasing US agricultural production, lowering fertilizer costs, and providing humanitarian food aid to those hurt by the sharp increase in agricultural prices. Here we consider these proposals and other questionable policies such as opening the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and conclude by discussing policies that could provide more immediate relief by addressing and mitigating constraints in the vegetable oil market.

Russia, the use of force and self-defence – The continued relevance of Public International Law

June 1, 2022

In a speech delivered by Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin, justifying his invasion and attack on Ukraine on 24 February 2022, he claimed that he was lauching a 'special military operation' in self-defence due to the expansion of NATO eastward, and the increasing military, technology and other capabilities of Western states posing a security threat to Russia (Putin, 2022). He also argued that the Russian Federation was acting in collective self-defence with the Ukrainian regions: Donetsk and Luhansk, which had declared independence earlier in Feburary 2022 and had been unilaterally recognised by Russia. Without providing evidence Putin claims, that the Russian-speaking population of Donetsk and Luhansk are "facing humiliation and genocide, perpetrated by the Kyiv regime" (Putin, 2022). He alleged that the 'special military operation' was not an occupation, nor did it intend to interfere with the interests of the Ukrainian people, but rather that it was a response to the hostage-taking of Ukraine by neo-Nazis and Western powers. It should come as no surprise that the West's perspective is the exact opposite, accusing the Russian Federation of violating international law and the rules governing self-defence (Kerr, 2022). In the face of Russia's unjustified use of for against Ukraine, and the apparent inability of the international community's mechanisms and institutions to reign, Putin, in the continuined relevance of international law needs to be reviewed. To determine whether public international law is still alive and well, it is first necessary to look at the relevant law that governs the situation, the context and actions of the relevant stakeholders, and the enforcement mechanisms of the United Nations. Of course, it has become clear that the Russian Federation has committed violations of international law beyond the use of force prohibition in their armed attacks in Ukraine, which is beyond the scope of this article.

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Moldova Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Ukraine Response - Three Month Update

May 25, 2022

In the last three months, we have provided more than 2.9 million people in Ukraine, Poland and Moldova with critically needed supplies and health servicesSupporting 33 health facilities and 17 refugee and internally displaced persons (IDP) centersDelivered 212 tons of medical consumables and pharmaceuticals, such as antibiotics and medicines for noncommunicable diseases, pediatric patients and surgery and traumaProcured and distributed nearly 16,000 health, hygiene, protection and COVID-19 testing kitsTrained nearly 370 first responders on topics including PFA and psychosocial support servicesConducted 2,977 health consultationsConducted 307 MHPSS consultations 

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Ukraine Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.