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Spotlight on Poland: Negative Views of Russia Surge, but Ratings for U.S., NATO, EU Improve

June 22, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has led to a dramatic shift in attitudes in Poland, a key European partner and one which only three decades ago was part of the former Soviet Union's Eastern Bloc. Negative attitudes among Poles towards Russia are at all-time highs since Pew Research Center began tracking opinion on this question in 2007, with virtually unanimous negative opinions of the Russian state. Currently, 94% see Russia as a major threat, up from 65% who said this in 2018, and 94% have no confidence at all in Russian President Vladimir Putin -- also an all-time high. The sharp decline in positive attitudes toward Russia has benefited Poland's western allies, specifically the United States, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (Poland is a member of both NATO and the EU). Around nine-in-ten Poles have a favorable view of the U.S., NATO and the EU, all of which represent the highest shares since 2007. In terms of Poland's relationship with the U.S., the increase in favorable attitudes toward America coincides with a strong 82% confidence rating for U.S. President Joe Biden, a marked increase from the 51% who had confidence in former President Donald Trump in 2019. In addition, roughly two-thirds in Poland see having a close relationship with the U.S. as more important than having one with Russia. Only 1% want a closer relationship with Russia, while 28% volunteer that both are equally important. Just three years ago, more than half of Poles (53%) offered that both relationships are equally important.

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Poland Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Ukraine Response - Three Month Update

May 25, 2022

In the last three months, we have provided more than 2.9 million people in Ukraine, Poland and Moldova with critically needed supplies and health servicesSupporting 33 health facilities and 17 refugee and internally displaced persons (IDP) centersDelivered 212 tons of medical consumables and pharmaceuticals, such as antibiotics and medicines for noncommunicable diseases, pediatric patients and surgery and traumaProcured and distributed nearly 16,000 health, hygiene, protection and COVID-19 testing kitsTrained nearly 370 first responders on topics including PFA and psychosocial support servicesConducted 2,977 health consultationsConducted 307 MHPSS consultations 

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #15

May 23, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 14 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 8,089 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,811 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.The consequences of the war, particularly those related to food, are being felt worldwide. The crisis has caused inflation of prices for grains, food oils and fertilizer, creating food crises where previously there were none, and has exacerbated conditions in places already experiencing food insecurity. Fuel availability worldwide also is a concern, particularly in Ukraine, where the price of and access to fuel are impeding humanitarian efforts to deliver aid.Since February, more than 6.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 19, at least 3,296,792 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 930,341 had entered Romania, 465,435 had entered Moldova, 615,256 had entered Hungary and 426,605 had entered Slovakia, while 863,086 had entered Russia and 27,308 had entered Belarus.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #14

May 12, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 14 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 7,256 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,496 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In Ukraine, conflict remains concentrated in eastern and southern regions. According to OCHA, before 2022 eastern Ukraine was among the most minecontaminated regions in the world. Since the invasion, the State Emergency Service (SES) of Ukraine has disposed of more than 102,000 explosive devices and more than 1,900 aerial bombs. The Interior Minister announced the launch of the International Coordination Centre for Humanitarian Demining, which SES will work in collaboration with, to reduce casualties from explosive remnants of war.Since the invasion, almost 6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 12, at least 3,251,955 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 889,674 had entered Romania, 458,242 had entered Moldova, 577,820 had entered Hungary and 406,833 had entered Slovakia, while 772,121 had entered Russia and 27,108 had entered Belarus. According to Poland's Office for Foreigners, more than 1 million Ukrainian nationals--47% of whom are children--have registered for a national PESEL number, allowing them to access services such as health and social support.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #13

May 5, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 13 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 6,635 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,238 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.In addition to widespread conflict in the southeast, Russian attacks have targeted Ukrainian infrastructure throughout the country, in an attempt to thwart efforts from the west to provide Ukrainians with weapons and supplies. Recent missile strikes on railway stations caused damage to the stations, as well as to surrounding infrastructure, but the impact of the attacks is not expected to have a significant impact on the ability to deliver aid.Since the invasion, more than 5.7 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 5, at least 3,119,196 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 854,292 had entered Romania, 450,797 had entered Moldova, 545,311 had entered Hungary and 388,282 had entered Slovakia, while 714,713 had entered Russia and 25,852 had entered Belarus.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #12

April 28, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 12 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 5,840 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 2,729 killed.Now, two months since the conflict began, 24 million people are estimated to be in need of humanitarian assistance. The most recent needs assessment conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) reveals that one in three Ukrainian households have at least one person with a chronic disease who is unable to easily access healthcare. Such challenges are expected to be exacerbated as the conflict continues.Since the invasion, more than 5.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 28, at least 2,944,164 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 783,420 had entered Romania, 437,362 had entered Moldova, 502,142 had entered Hungary and 360,458 had entered Slovakia, while 627,512 had entered Russia and 24,719 had entered Belarus.

Ukraine: The War Told Via the Stories of Those Fleeing Conflict

April 24, 2022

We have decided to create a collection of stories in this e-book, to offer a broad picture of what is happening, what the war means, and the reasons that in Ukraine, as in other parts of the world, push people to run from their nation homes. We also reflect on how much the "willingness to welcome" counts. Our aim is to attentively follow the facts today and build a shared memory for tomorrow that helps us avoid mistakes made in the past.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #14

April 22, 2022

The conflict in Ukraine has now displaced 7.1 million Ukrainians to date. The most pressing needs among this population are cash and financial support, transportation, food, shelter, and hygiene items. Many are also in need of medicines and health services. The humanitarian conditions for those who remain in their homes are also severe: Over 1.4 million people are without running water in Eastern Ukraine and an additional 1.6 million across the country are in immediate risk of losing their access. Many others face significant protection, food, and health risks.Project HOPE's support to health facilities and IDPs in Ukraine continues to scale up in response to the overwhelming needs. We are establishing focus on three hubs of support in West Ukraine, East Ukraine, and the Kyiv area with potential expansion to Odessa and Kherson and other areas as security allows.We have also imported more than 150 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.We are also establishing a trauma care training model to roll out to medical professionals on the front lines.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #11

April 21, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the war began, at least 5,264 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 2,345 killed.Nearly two months since the invasion, fighting continues throughout Ukraine, with the heaviest conflicts in the eastern part of the country, in Donetska, Luhanska and Kharkivska oblasts, in both government- and non-governmentcontrolled areas. Last week, the southern city of Mykolaic came under attack. Ukrainians in the affected area have been without access to water since April 17. Attacks have also moved toward western Ukraine, with an attack on April 18 causing 18 civilian casualties in Lviv.The country's Ministry for Reintegration of Ukraine reported the evacuation of more than 4,300 civilians from communities affected by hostilities. Evacuations remain difficult to execute, and many Ukrainians are still hard to reach, as shelling and ongoing conflict have thwarted efforts to safely move people.Since the invasion, more than 5 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 21, at least 2,825,463 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 757,047 had entered Romania, 426,964 had entered Moldova, 471,080 had entered Hungary and 342,813 had entered Slovakia, while 549,805 had entered Russia and 23,759 had entered Belarus. Of refugee arrivals surveyed at border crossings, 89% have been female. 78% of respondents report traveling with children under 18, 11% traveling with elderly persons and 5% traveling with persons with disabilities.

Conflict in Ukraine: Situation Report #13

April 15, 2022

Project HOPE continues to scale up operations in Eastern Europe to respond to the ongoing humanitarian crisis. Our teams in Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Ukraine bring technical knowledge on health, mental health, protection, and other sectors with considerable field experience, and a strong relationship with local and international actors to forge a targeted and comprehensive response.This week, more than 7,900 doses of insulin reached Project HOPE's warehouse in Lviv and are now en route to Kharkiv. Project HOPE has imported more than 100 pallets of medicine and medical supplies to date, including Interagency Emergency Health Kits (IEHKs), Essential Health Packs (EHPs), Trauma and Emergency Surgery Kits (TESKs), first aid kits, prenatal supplements, hygiene kits, and infant kits. These supplies have been delivered to six hospitals across Lviv, Kyiv, Cherkasy, Poltova and Kharkiv.In Moldova, Project HOPE has procured more than 300 wheelchairs to be distributed to a local organization serving Ukrainian refugees. We also continue to support  SAMU's Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) to serve refugees crossing the Ukraine/Moldova border as per the request of the WHO and Moldovan Ministry of Health. The most prevalent diagnoses have included hypertension, upper respiratory infections, and acute mental health issues.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: Report #10

April 14, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II. Since the crisis began, at least 4,521 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 1,932 killed, with actual numbers likely much higher.Attacks continue on the cities of Kharkiv and Mariupol, with shelling also reported in Luhansk, Kharkiv, Donetsk and southern Kherson oblasts. The situation in Mariupol remains catastrophic, with 130,000 people still trapped in the city. Though the security situation in northern Ukraine is reportedly improving, 96,000 people across the east are still without electricity, and water has been cut off in Popasna, Rubizhne and Sievierodonetsk. Many people trapped in affected areas face security risks, a lack of information on where to find accommodation and safety, and a lack of basic needs such as food, water and medicines.The State Emergency Service of Ukraine (SESU) reports that nearly half of Ukraine requires de-mining as a result of the invasion. The Department of Pyrotechnic Works and Humanitarian Demining is removing and neutralizing 2,000 to 6,000 explosive devices each day. The mines and other explosive devices, including unexploded ordinance and IEDs left by the Russians, pose a serious risk to civilians and increased need for emergency and traumarelated health supplies.Since the invasion, more than 4.6 million people have fled Ukraine. As of April 14, at least 2,669,637 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 709,219 had entered Romania, 415,850 had entered Moldova, 434,342 had entered Hungary, 323,020 had entered Slovakia, 433,083 had entered Russia and 21,852 had entered Belarus.