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Social Media Seen as Mostly Good for Democracy Across Many Nations, But U.S. is a Major Outlier

December 6, 2022

As people across the globe have increasingly turned to Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and other platforms to get their news and express their opinions, the sphere of social media has become a new public space for discussing – and often arguing bitterly – about political and social issues. And in the mind of many analysts, social media is one of the major reasons for the declining health of democracy in nations around the world.However, as a new Pew Research Center survey of 19 advanced economies shows, ordinary citizens see social media as both a constructive and destructive component of political life, and overall most believe it has actually had a positive impact on democracy. Across the countries polled, a median of 57% say social media has been more of a good thing for their democracy, with 35% saying it has been a bad thing.There are substantial cross-national differences on this question, however, and the United States is a clear outlier: Just 34% of U.S. adults think social media has been good for democracy, while 64% say it has had a bad impact. In fact, the U.S. is an outlier on a number of measures, with larger shares of Americans seeing social media as divisive.

Contested Subjects across Cold War Frontiers: Hungarian Refugees from 1956

July 29, 2022

My project follows Hungarian refugees from the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1956 through the Cold War ideological and institutional structures of the immediate postwar period. To what extent did they adopt a Cold War script, and conversely and to what extent were they conditioned by the constraints of the geopolitical order? Moreover, how did they help constitute the international meaning of the Revolution? This project is motivated by answers to these questions and uses individual Hungarian refugee trajectories to unpack new insights on the Cold War, as well as how the Cold War obscured other concerns at the time – for instance, decolonization and processing the memories of the Second World War.

Navigating Climate Change in Europe: The Choices Ahead

July 1, 2022

This report draws on polling from 26,000 people and over 50 focus groups across France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and the UK in 2021 and 2022 and explores how best to build on the wide public consensus for climate action to advance much-needed climate solutions.We make observations and recommendations that we hope will aid civil society organisations, the Green movement, and those in policymaking roles to elevate the prioritisation of climate change in Europe and successfully advance climate solutions. In addition to using standard demographic analyses, we also draw on our segmentation studies in Germany, France, and the UK to examine the relevance of the psychology and values of key subgroups as they relate to climate change. Our recommendations draw on points of broad agreement that we hope will work not only to advance climate change policies, but also diffuse political division and deepen a sense of common cause.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #17

June 24, 2022

International Medical Corps, which has a history in Ukraine stretching back to 1999, has been operating continuously in the country since 2014, when we began providing medical, mental health and protection services, and infection prevention and control (IPC) programs in response to the conflict in the southeast. Following the Russian invasion in February 2022, we expanded our operations throughout the country, with programs in health, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS), protection, gender-based violence (GBV), nutrition, food security and livelihoods, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).International Medical Corps currently has operations in Chernihiv, Dnipro, Kyiv, Lviv, Odesa and Vinnytsia. From these operational hubs, International Medical Corps also provides material support in the way of food, non-food items (NFIs), and medical supplies and equipment to Donetsk, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv. 

Spotlight on Poland: Negative Views of Russia Surge, but Ratings for U.S., NATO, EU Improve

June 22, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has led to a dramatic shift in attitudes in Poland, a key European partner and one which only three decades ago was part of the former Soviet Union's Eastern Bloc. Negative attitudes among Poles towards Russia are at all-time highs since Pew Research Center began tracking opinion on this question in 2007, with virtually unanimous negative opinions of the Russian state. Currently, 94% see Russia as a major threat, up from 65% who said this in 2018, and 94% have no confidence at all in Russian President Vladimir Putin -- also an all-time high. The sharp decline in positive attitudes toward Russia has benefited Poland's western allies, specifically the United States, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (Poland is a member of both NATO and the EU). Around nine-in-ten Poles have a favorable view of the U.S., NATO and the EU, all of which represent the highest shares since 2007. In terms of Poland's relationship with the U.S., the increase in favorable attitudes toward America coincides with a strong 82% confidence rating for U.S. President Joe Biden, a marked increase from the 51% who had confidence in former President Donald Trump in 2019. In addition, roughly two-thirds in Poland see having a close relationship with the U.S. as more important than having one with Russia. Only 1% want a closer relationship with Russia, while 28% volunteer that both are equally important. Just three years ago, more than half of Poles (53%) offered that both relationships are equally important.

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #16

June 9, 2022

International Medical Corps, which has a history in Ukraine stretching back to 1999, has been operating continuously since 2014, when we began providing medical, mental health and protection services, and infection prevention and control programs in response to the conflict in the southeast. Following the Russian invasion in February 2022, International Medical Corps expanded our operations throughout the country, with programs in health, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS), protection, nutrition, food security and livelihoods, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)International Medical Corps currently has operations in Chernihiv, Dnipro, Kyiv, Lviv, Odessa and Vinnytsia. From these operational hubs, International Medical Corps also provides material support in the way of food, non-food items (NFIs), and medical supplies and equipment to Donetsk, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv.International Medical Corps is providing context-based programming based on the security, access and needs that have been brought about by the invasion. In each context, we are approaching our emergency response in a tailored way to meet the specific needs of the people.In liberated zones, we are focusing on stabilization and recovery efforts. Our response philosophy is to rehabilitate, repair and support the healthcare system, ensure access to emerging MHPSS, protection and WASH needs, and ensure that the local population has access to such basic such as food, shelter, water and cash. In high-risk zones, we are focused on preparation measures ensuring that the healthcare and social systems are resilient to any shocks if and when conflict occurs. We are also focused on providing services to internally displaced persons (IDPs) and residents. In accessible zones, International Medical Corps is focused on ensuring the safety and well-being of IDPs in the region. 

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Slovakia Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Poland Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Romania Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Waiting for the Sky to Close: The Unprecedented Crisis Facing Women and Girls Fleeing Ukraine - Hungary Assessment Report

May 25, 2022

The global humanitarian community is failing to meet the needs of women and girls displaced by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and adequately support women- and girl-led organizations on the frontlines of the emergency response, according to a new, seven-part regional assessment from VOICE, in partnership with HIAS.The reports were developed by VOICE's 10-member assessment team, who spent four weeks speaking to women's rights organizations, frontline workers, local NGOs, government workers, United Nations agency actors, and internally displaced and refugee populations in Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. VOICE also conducted virtual interviews with women's rights groups and other local organizations in Ukraine.The reports paint a vivid picture of the challenges faced by women and girls who have been displaced by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, as well as the need to ensure that women's rights organizations and other local actors are integrated into response design and leadership from the beginning.

Ukraine Response - Three Month Update

May 25, 2022

In the last three months, we have provided more than 2.9 million people in Ukraine, Poland and Moldova with critically needed supplies and health servicesSupporting 33 health facilities and 17 refugee and internally displaced persons (IDP) centersDelivered 212 tons of medical consumables and pharmaceuticals, such as antibiotics and medicines for noncommunicable diseases, pediatric patients and surgery and traumaProcured and distributed nearly 16,000 health, hygiene, protection and COVID-19 testing kitsTrained nearly 370 first responders on topics including PFA and psychosocial support servicesConducted 2,977 health consultationsConducted 307 MHPSS consultations 

International Medical Corps Situation Update: #15

May 23, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine that began on February 24 has led to Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 14 million people forcibly displaced. In addition, since the war began, at least 8,089 civilian casualties have been reported in the country, including 3,811 killed. The United Nations says the actual numbers are likely much higher.The consequences of the war, particularly those related to food, are being felt worldwide. The crisis has caused inflation of prices for grains, food oils and fertilizer, creating food crises where previously there were none, and has exacerbated conditions in places already experiencing food insecurity. Fuel availability worldwide also is a concern, particularly in Ukraine, where the price of and access to fuel are impeding humanitarian efforts to deliver aid.Since February, more than 6.3 million people have fled Ukraine. As of May 19, at least 3,296,792 people had crossed the border from Ukraine into Poland, 930,341 had entered Romania, 465,435 had entered Moldova, 615,256 had entered Hungary and 426,605 had entered Slovakia, while 863,086 had entered Russia and 27,308 had entered Belarus.