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Annual Impact Report, Fiscal Year 2022: July 2021 to June 2022

November 1, 2022

EngenderHealth's fiscal year 2022 (FY22) impact report illustrates our progress across 22 projects, while countries continued to grapple with the immediate and longer-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our progress and associated impacts are guided by our organizational Strategic Plan and complementary Theory of Change (see Figure 1). This report highlights our overall impact and examines findings related to each level of the socioecological model represented in our theory of change, including our influence on policies, laws, and processes; our contributions to health systems; and our impact on communities and individuals at the center of our work. We also illustrate our achievements in relation to our three core impact areas: sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) (including contraception care, abortion care, and more), gender-based violence (GBV), and maternal and obstetric care—all of which critically support EngenderHealth's mission. Furthermore, the report highlights how we achieve our results through specific pathways to change, including community engagement, digital health, and health systems strengthening; and via our priority approaches of gender-transformative change, localization of leadership, meaningful youth participation, and partnerships. All our achievements are accelerated through partnerships, learning, and leadership, and through our emphasis on organizational effectiveness and gender equity, which amplifies our impact.

Reducing Abortion Stigma: Global Achievements since 2014

February 10, 2021

Abortion stigma affects everyone: individuals, communities and service providers. Young women and adolescent girls bear the brunt of abortion stigma. It causes delays in people seeking abortion and stops others from accessing it, leading to unintended pregnancies. Stigma drives abortion underground, where it is more likely to be unsafe.Since 2014, the support of the David & Lucile Packard Foundation has enabled IPPF to reduce abortion stigma affecting young people around the world, working directly with Member Associations in six countries (Bénin, Burkina Faso, India, Pakistan, Ghana and Nepal). Meaningful youth participation has ensured that young people's lived experiences were central in every aspect of this work. This project has also supported smaller ground-breaking youth-led projects in 14 different countries: Albania, Colombia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Macedonia, Nepal, Nigeria, Palestine, Puerto Rico, Sierra Leone, Spain, Tanzania and Venezuela.This document highlights the achievements and learnings from the Abortion Stigma Project between 2014 and 2020, including case studies, research and evidence generated around abortion stigma, and popular resources and tools developed throughout the project, and more.

Access to Public Information: Between Obstacles & Opportunities Towards Open Government in Benin

January 21, 2021

Open government in Benin has been on the agenda of politicians and civil society for the past five years. The concept aims at effective governance through transparency and accountability of public authorities. However, certain basic requirements for its implementation in our country continue to be an obstacle. Among them is the non-recognition of the right of access to public information – one of the pillars of open government. The NGO Coalition of Benin for an Open Government1, with support from NIMD (Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy), brought together Beninese parliamentarians in Cotonou for an advocacy seminar on access to public information from 11 – 13 August 2020. This is yet another advocacy meeting whose objective was "to get the Beninese legislature to take charge of the content and challenges of Open Government and its score for a successful process" of Benin's accession to the Open Government Partnership (OGP), specifically aimed at sensitising parliamentarians on the need to provide Benin with a law that effectively promotes access to public information.

Social Accountability Guidebook (2nd Edition)

January 1, 2020

The second edition of Social Accountability Guidebook for CSOs is a learning resource that is intended to support the building of a community of practice of social accountability practitioners, advocates, and champions in West Africa. This guidebook is an updated version of the first edition which was published in 2018. The Guidebook presents case studies of social accountability initiatives from the West African region, interspersed with definitions of terminologies related to the concept. It is intended to deepen understanding and foster appreciation of the concept of social accountability, its potential for strengthening accountability in the region, and the challenges that may be encountered in implementing social accountability initiatives in the West African Context. It is hoped that the Guidebook will serve as a catalyst for further development and tailoring of the concept of social accountability in West Africa, by CSOs, development practitioners, local and central government agencies, the donor community, and all others who are interested in advancing accountability in West Africa.

Towards A New Approach to Address Drug Trafficking

June 1, 2018

Action-research was conducted in Benin, Ghana and Senegal as case studies to interrogate the state of the approach addressing the traffic, production and consumption of drugs and its relative impacts on the state and society in West Africa in terms of human security, governance, democracy and socio-economic development.

Sustainability Assessment of Rural Water Service Delivery Models : Findings of a Multi-Country Review

August 25, 2017

With 2.1 billion people – mostly in rural areas – lacking safely managed drinking water and reported low rural water supply functionality rates, the Sustainable Development Goals pose a triple challenge: to reach unserved mostly rural population groups, to raise service levels, and to sustain existing and future services. This assessment uses a multi-country case study approach to identify good practices and challenges toward building sector capacity and strengthening sustainable service delivery models for rural areas. Recognizing the limitations of the Demand Responsive Approach, the emergence of various management models, the identified need for ongoing support to rural service providers, and the critical role of enabling institutions and policies beyond the community-level, the added value of this assessment lies in: i) the development of a comprehensive analytical framework that can be used to analyze and operationalize a more sustainable service delivery approach for rural water supply; ii) the rich set of cases and good practices from the 16 countries informing the global body of "knowledge in implementation," and iii) the formulation of recommendations and policy directions to improve the sustainability of services depending on sector development stage. Policy recommendations are centered around five areas: institutional capacity, financing, asset management, water resources management, and monitoring and regulatory oversight.

Effectiveness of Anticorruption Agencies in West Africa

October 1, 2016

This research assesses efforts in fighting corruption in six countries in West Africa with very different governance, macroeconomic, sociopolitical, and institutional characteristics: Benin, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone.Similar research has been undertaken by the Open Society Foundation's Africa Regional Office in Eastern and Southern Africa. The raison d'être was to carry out a comparative study which would examine the rationale underlying the successes and failures of agencies devoted to the prevention and combating of corruption, with the aim ultimately being to establish ways and means of strengthening anticorruption efforts on the African continent.

Effectiveness of Anticorruption Agencies in West Africa: French

October 1, 2016

This research assesses efforts in fighting corruption in six countries in West Africa with very different governance, macroeconomic, sociopolitical, and institutional characteristics: Benin, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone.Similar research has been undertaken by the Open Society Foundation's Africa Regional Office in Eastern and Southern Africa. The raison d'être was to carry out a comparative study which would examine the rationale underlying the successes and failures of agencies devoted to the prevention and combating of corruption, with the aim ultimately being to establish ways and means of strengthening anticorruption efforts on the African continent

Monitoring Climate Finance in Developing Countries: Challenges and Next Steps

April 10, 2014

At the 18th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the parties agreed to a standard format for developed countries to follow when reporting on the climate finance they provide to developing countries. Developed countries will use these formats for the first time when they submit their Biennial Reports to the UNFCCC in early 2014. Later in 2014, developing countries are expected to submit Biennial Update Reports showing the financial support that they have received. From initial attempts to measure and report climate finance by developed and developing countries, it is already apparent that information on finance provided is unlikely to match information on finance received.Aside from the reporting requirements of the UNFCCC, better financial data can help decision makers in developing countries identify gaps, improve coordination and management, and raise funds to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Better climate finance information can also enable countries to draw lessons from the use of different financial instruments and develop strategies and policies that aim to expand finance for climate change. Improved data will allow the information reported by developed countries to be cross-checked, thus promoting transparency, completeness, and accuracy. Finally, it can contribute to a more comprehensive picture of climate financial flows in relation to development assistance at the national and international levels. This working paper reports on three workshops in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, in which participants discussed some of the steps that developing countries and their international partners can take toward monitoring and tracking climate finance more effectively. More than 40 representatives from 20 developing countries, regional development banks, and national organizations attended the three workshops. Participants shared information on the limits of existing legislation and mandates, national planning and approval processes, financial management systems, efforts to coordinate among ministries and development partners, and many other unique challenges faced by the participating countries. WRI obtained additional information via a questionnaire, follow-up correspondence, and interviews with representatives of the countries.

Plan Cadre des Nations Unies Pour L'assistance au Développement du Bénin

March 1, 2014

This report Investigates on UN aid for Benin country

Benin: CSO Governance and Financial Sustainability

January 1, 2014

Nowadays, Civil Society Organizations (CSO's) are widely recognized as full actors of development. They are noted for theircapacity to reach, represent and defend the vulnerable and socially excluded. They give them the means to act and may emerge as agents of social change.

Comportements Stratégiques-Types des Dirigeants au Sein des Petites et Moyennes Entreprises Agroalimentaires (PMEAA) au Bénin: Création de Richesses et Réduction de la Pauvreté

October 1, 2013

Le présent article tente d'identifier les comportements stratégiques-types des dirigeants des PMEAA et de mesurer leurs effets sur la création de la richesse et la réduction de la pauvreté au Bénin. Les résultats empiriques obtenus  montrent que les dirigeants adoptent dans leur majorité des comportements patrimoniaux, alors que ce sont les comportements entrepreneuriaux qui permettent d'améliorer la richesse créée à hauteur de 0,62 millions de FCFA. Cette  richesse créée améliore dans le ménage le niveau d'éducation des enfants, la sécurité alimentaire et les conditions d'accès aux soins de santé. Il en est de même pour l'accès à l'eau potable et à l'électricité, l'épanouissement de la femme et l'amélioration du niveau de revenu du ménage, ainsi que la création d'emploi pour la société.