Clear all

370 results found

reorder grid_view

Climate Change: A series of Case Studies on South African Funder's Climate Journeys (Volume 2)

February 5, 2024

Climate change is an increasingly pressing global issue that requires an immediate and concerted response to limit its most catastrophic consequences. Funders can play a key role in responding to climate change, however, funder responses to climate change have historically been relatively limited.That said, more funders are beginning to acknowledge the urgency with which climate change needs to be addressed and are increasingly seeing the impacts that climate change has on the often vulnerable communities that they serve. These climate change impacts have further implications for funders' work on other socio-economic challenges, with the communities that they serve facing additional challenges relating to food security, water scarcity, environmental damage, and heat waves.

Conversion Therapy Online: The Ecosystem In 2023

January 23, 2024

In January 2022, the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism (GPAHE) published extensive research on the online conversion "therapy" ecosystem. GPAHE looked at searches for terms related to conversion therapy in six countries and in four languages: Australia, Colombia, Germany, Ireland, Kenya in English and Swahili, and in the United States in English and Spanish. Conversion therapy materials were assessed on Google, Bing, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, and in some cases, PayPal and Alexa. In a separate report, the research also documented those conversion therapy providers that surfaced prominently in online searches. The list of terms used in this research can be found in the appendix. GPAHE's 2022 research was successfully used to educate tech companies on how they were failing users regarding disinformation about conversion therapy. Though some social media companies already supposedly banned or downgraded this material, it was still widely prevalent in 2022 and a significant number of providers had accounts on the major platforms. After GPAHE's report, many providers were deplatformed on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, PayPal and Apple, and the algorithmic rabbit holes, the paths driving searchers to more and more disinformation, were mitigated. Search engines Google and Bing also made improvements to their algorithms. An effort spearheaded by GLAAD but employing GPAHE's 2022 research led TikTok to ban promotion of conversion therapy on the platform, and today the platform seems relatively clear of such material. These were considerable successes in protecting the public from online conversion therapy disinformation. But challenges remain particularly in the context of non-English languages, in the enforcement of the rules banning conversion therapy online, and in the skill with which promoters use social media to spread their dangerous messages while circumventing social media content moderation rules.This 2023 report is a follow up GPAHE's 2022 research and examines the same material in Brazil, Benin, Burkina Faso, the Ivory Coast, Mali, Mexico, South Africa in isiZulu, and the U.S. in English and Spanish. In the case of West Africa, French results were collected, and though local languages were tried, they rarely appeared in search results because of the lack of online material in languages such as Dioula. GPAHE has also added TikTok to its research in some cases.

From Pollution to Solution in Six African Cities

November 23, 2023

Air pollution is Africa's silent killer. Each year, air pollution kills more Africans than HIV / AIDS and malaria combined. In addition to the 1 million Africans who die from diseases caused by indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution annually, millions more have to live with its devastating consequences. This problem is worse in cities, where highly polluting activities stunt the health of both their residents and economies. Analysis undertaken for the Clean Air Fund by Dalberg Advisors finds that left unchecked, air pollution will collectively cost Accra, Cairo, Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi and Yaoundé an estimated US$138bn in premature deaths and worker absenteeism by 2040, equivalent to 8% of their current combined GDPs.The continent's rapid urban growth should not come at the expense of the health of its citizens. African cities can choose to put themselves on the path of green growth, in which investments to tackle the major sources of air pollution bring about benefits to worker productivity, national health budgets and help create healthy, equitable and prosperous places to live. African governments are increasingly aware of this challenge. The Africa Integrated Assessment outlines the steps needed to reach green growth, but realising this blueprint for Africa requires more comprehensive, coordinated and scaled action. This analysis shows that across the six case study cities, actions taken today could prevent 109,000 premature deaths and prevent the loss of US$19bn by 2040.Drawing on best-practice case studies from across the African continent, this policy brief lays out recommendations that can help governments unleash green urban economic growth. Investments in good governance and legislation, better air quality monitoring, evidence-based emission reduction policies, effective partnership models and training, and improved access to climate financing are essential to meeting this challenge. These recommendations represent the first step for governments to consider as they design and deliver locally-tailored action.

From Pollution to Solution in Six African Cities (French Version)

November 23, 2023

La pollution de l'air est un véritable fléau silencieux pour l'Afrique. Chaque année, l'air pollué tue plus d'Africains que l'eau insalubre, l'assainissement et le lavage des mains combinés. En plus du million d'Africains qui meurent chaque année de la pollution de l'air provenant de sources intérieures et extérieures, des millions d'autres vies doivent vivre avec ses conséquences dévastatrices. La situation est bien pire dans les villes, où les activités hautement polluantes nuisent à la santé des habitants et à l'économie. Une étude réalisée par Dalberg Advisors pour le Clean Air Fund révèle que si rien n'est fait, la pollution de l'air coûtera collectivement à Accra, au Caire, à Johannesburg, à Lagos, à Nairobi et à Yaoundé environ 138 milliards de dollars US en décès prématurés et en absentéisme des travailleurs d'ici à 2040, ce qui représente 8 % de leurs PIB actuels combinés.L'urbanisation rapide du continent ne devrait pas se faire au détriment de la santé de ses citoyens. Les villes africaines peuvent opter pour une croissance verte, dans laquelle les investissements visant à lutter contre les principales sources de pollution atmosphérique contribuent à améliorer la productivité des travailleurs et les budgets nationaux de santé, et à créer des lieux de vie sains, équitables et prospères. Les gouvernements africains prennent de plus en plus conscience de l'importance cruciale de ce défi. L'Évaluation environnementale intégrée en Afrique présente les mesures nécessaires pour parvenir à une croissance verte, mais la mise en œuvre de ce projet pour l'Afrique nécessite une action plus globale, coordonnée et à plus grande échelle. Cette analyse indique que dans les six villes étudiées, des mesures prises aujourd'hui pourraient permettre d'éviter 109 000 décès prématurés et la perte de 19 milliards de dollars US d'ici à 2040.Se fondant sur des études de cas de meilleures pratiques à travers le continent africain, cette note stratégique formule des recommandations susceptibles d'aider les gouvernements à favoriser une croissance économique verte en milieu urbain. Pour relever ce défi, il est essentiel d'investir dans la bonne gouvernance et la législation, d'améliorer le suivi de la qualité de l'air, de mener des politiques de réduction des émissions scientifiquement fondées, de mettre en place des modèles de partenariat et des formations efficaces, et d'améliorer l'accès au financement de la lutte contre le changement climatique. Ces recommandations représentent la première étape de conception et de mise en œuvre d'actions adaptées au niveau local que les gouvernements doivent prendre en compte.Air pollution is Africa's silent killer. Each year, air pollution kills more Africans than HIV / AIDS and malaria combined. In addition to the 1 million Africans who die from diseases caused by indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution annually, millions more have to live with its devastating consequences. This problem is worse in cities, where highly polluting activities stunt the health of both their residents and economies. Analysis undertaken for the Clean Air Fund by Dalberg Advisors finds that left unchecked, air pollution will collectively cost Accra, Cairo, Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi and Yaoundé an estimated US$138bn in premature deaths and worker absenteeism by 2040, equivalent to 8% of their current combined GDPs.The continent's rapid urban growth should not come at the expense of the health of its citizens. African cities can choose to put themselves on the path of green growth, in which investments to tackle the major sources of air pollution bring about benefits to worker productivity, national health budgets and help create healthy, equitable and prosperous places to live. African governments are increasingly aware of this challenge. The Africa Integrated Assessment outlines the steps needed to reach green growth, but realising this blueprint for Africa requires more comprehensive, coordinated and scaled action. This analysis shows that across the six case study cities, actions taken today could prevent 109,000 premature deaths and prevent the loss of US$19bn by 2040.Drawing on best-practice case studies from across the African continent, this policy brief lays out recommendations that can help governments unleash green urban economic growth. Investments in good governance and legislation, better air quality monitoring, evidence-based emission reduction policies, effective partnership models and training, and improved access to climate financing are essential to meeting this challenge. These recommendations represent the first step for governments to consider as they design and deliver locally-tailored action.

Suffocating Under Fossil Fuels: The Climate Crisis and the Threat to Health and Well-Being, A Guidance Document on Climate Change & Health Impacts for Health Professionals in South Africa

September 16, 2023

In 2022, South Africa ranked 96 out of 182 in terms of climate change vulnerability, which means that it is highly vulnerable to climate change. It is projected that the country will experience a monthly mean temperature increase of 2°C by 2050, resulting in an increase in the incidence of extreme weather events such as floods and droughts, events the country is all too familiar with. South Africans must contend with high rates of unemployment affecting 7.8 million citizens, a planet in crisis, poverty, inequality, violence, issues around access to education, and healthcare, and now climate change. Worryingly, climate change does not appear to be receiving the necessary level of attention from policymakers in South Africa. According to the Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) for 2023, an instrument seeking to enable transparency in national and international climate politics which measures the climate performance and extent of GHG emissions of individual countries, South Africa ranked 44th out of 59 countries and the European Union, having dropped from the 39th rank in the previous index. The index scores countries on GHGs Emissions (40% of the overall ranking), Renewable Energy (20%), Energy Use (20%) and Climate Policy (20%), with the most favourable rating being "Very High". South Africa received mixed ratings across the four main CCPI categories: very low in Renewable Energy, low in GHGs Emissions and Climate Policy, but high in Energy. It was also ranked the 12th largest emitter of GHGs globally with the country highlighted as one of the biggest global producers of oil, gas, and coal, which are the biggest contributors to climate change. Suffice to say, these figures paint a very grim outlook for South Africa's climate change mitigation efforts.Healthcare professionals hold leverage over the decisions of society, determine whether climate change targets will be reached and the threat averted, and their voices are trusted in supporting the global reduction of emissions protecting people from the threats of climate change. Globally, healthcare professionals are considered a credible source of health information and so are essential in carrying health messages to the public.As such, this communications guide is prepared to support healthcare professionals to continue to think about conversations around climate change and health impacts amongst themselves, with their patients and communities. It seeks to highlight information that can be considered in preparing for media interviews, meetings with legislators or policymakers, as well as to create news articles or professional presentations. It is adapted from a Guidance Document on Climate Change & Health Impacts for Health Professionals in India published in May 2021 as a contribution to the conversation around climate change and health, aptly titled 'No Vaccine for Climate Change'.

A Feminist Analysis of the Triple Crisis: Climate Change, Debt, and COVID-19 in Zimbabwe and Kenya

July 21, 2023

This brief focuses on Zimbabwean and Kenyan examples as illustrative of the impacts of three interlinked crises in the African region. The chosen issues of climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and sovereign debt stem from a neoliberal economic system that works in cooperation with systems of oppression. This brief uses an intersectional feminist approach to understand this dynamic as well as advocate for systemic and long-term solutions.The context for this brief is the commitment of feminist movements who are part of the Feminist Action Nexus for Economic and Climate Justice ("Action Nexus") to develop more resources and materials for popular education and legal advocacy that advance a comprehensive feminist agenda. This feminist agenda is not a separate or new initiative, but a well-articulated one that draws on the work of feminist movements over generations. Our 2021 Blueprint for Feminist Economic Justice, a central piece that anchors the Action Nexus, acknowledges how our work mutually reinforces and reaffirms feminist agendas of over five decades and connects movements—including, but not limited to, trade justice, debt justice, and a Feminist Decolonial Global Green New Deal. More resources as well as a summary seven key demands of our work can be found on the Action Nexus webpage.A feminist analysis of the climate and debt crisis within the context of the pandemic is necessary to shine a light on the impacts of the injustices that neoliberal economic policies have on the lives and well-being of women and girls across Africa. It identifies and exposes the normalised and invisible configurations of structural injustice. The foreign debt that African countries are servicing has a direct impact on the full enjoyment of women's human rights. 

NNGO Voices: Leader Perspectives on Locally-Led Development

July 6, 2023

The development sector is moving towards shifting power to local development, decolonizing aid, and building a more equitable development architecture. Funders, INGOs, national/local NGOs (NNGOs), and governments play crucial roles in making these changes a reality. Humentum has published reports exploring different stakeholder perspectives, and this report focuses on the perspective of NNGOs. It presents insights from senior NNGO leaders in six African countries, discussing their perspectives and recommended solutions for power shift. This report is a valuable critical to the Collective Journey to Equitable Development series.

Scaling impact in education for transformative change: Practical recommendations from the Real-Time Scaling Labs

June 12, 2023

Transforming education systems is a complex process that requires understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the educational ecosystem and exploring new approaches, ideas, and initiatives to improve quality learning opportunities for children and youth. However, research shows it is not enough to simply identify effective education initiatives and expand them to more people. It takes a combination of technical expertise, understanding of local contexts, political strategy, collaborative partnership, flexible adaptation, and shared vision to scale and sustain the impact of education initiatives. Scaling cannot occur through one actor alone; it requires concerted and collaborative action by multiple actors at all levels of the education system.Too often, the work of scaling is not captured by typical monitoring and evaluation or research studies and lessons learned are not systematically documented. In response, in 2018 the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at Brookings launched a series of Real-time Scaling Labs (RTSLs) to generate more evidence and provide practical recommendations on how to expand, deepen, and sustain the impact of education initiatives leading to transformative change in education systems, especially for the most disadvantaged children and youth.The purpose of this report is to look across all six of the RTSL cases to analyze common themes, insights, and lessons learned about the process of scaling as well as interesting divergences, and to offer considerations for others looking to learn from or build on this work. This report is intended for governments, education implementers, donors, and researchers who are interested in collaborative approaches to scaling impact in education.

Regional Portrait of Catholic Care for Children in Eastern Africa: A study based on information from Kenya, Malawi, Uganda and Zambia

May 16, 2023

Catholic sisters are champions of care reform. Working with governmental, civic, and church leaders, and within their local communities, they are leading efforts to transition from institutional care toward family- and community-based care. Their leadership, service and spiritual witness have advanced the common good through a profound commitment to working on behalf of the vulnerable and marginalized. Focused on east Africa, this regional portrait offers data and information on care reform and the significant shifts and progress led by Catholic sisters in the region.

CTAP Final Report: The COVID-19 Transparency and Accountability Journey So Far

May 1, 2023

The pandemic has both exacerbated and exposed existing health sector challenges across the world. During the second phase of the COVID-19 Transparency and Accountability Project (CTAP), partners across 9 African countries utilized the multiple challenges of the crisis as a window of opportunity to advance health policy priorities.The organizations leading the CTAP work on the ground pivoted to create inclusive platforms for citizens to be informed and heard at the grassroots level, build coalitions with other CSOs to have greater collective impact, and call on governments for change through advocacy, and increasingly, collaboration to design and implement better policies going forward.This report provides a brief overview of what we did and what we learned, illustrative snapshots from each CTAP partner country, as well as insights into cross-country collaboration and the way forward. Together with our partners CODE and BudgIT, Global Integrity has helped to facilitate the CTAP journey since 2020 and served as a learning partner for the implementing organizations in Africa.

Philanthropy in BRICS countries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

March 1, 2023

Philanthropy in the BRICS countries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals is a review prepared by Russian Donors Forum alongside with the research Philanthropy and social investment in the BRICS countries. The review analyses how philanthropy in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa is aligning its activity with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), what progress has already been made and what challenges the sector faces.The review studies the common features of philanthropy of the BRICS countries, as well as the role of Agenda 2030 in the sector of philanthropy and social investment in each of the countries.

Philanthropy and social investment in BRICS countries

March 1, 2023

Philanthropy and social investment in the BRICS countries is a study initiated by the Russian Donors Forum Association and the Ural Federal University Center for Research of Philanthropy and Social Programs. The International partners of the study are the Worldwide Initiatives for Grantmaker Support Association (WINGS) and the Chief Executives for Corporate Purpose Association (CECP Global Exchange). In addition to the research there has been published a review Philanthropy in the BRICS countries and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.The aim of the study was to conduct a comparative analysis of the donor communities of the BRICS countries and to assess the COVID-19 impact on the sector of philanthropy and social investment.The study represents a portrait of the donor communities of the BRICS countries, the external conditions of their activities, including the regulatory environment; highlights the urgency of the donor organizations' work. In addition, the authors of the study tried to identify the challenges that arose before the donor community of the BRICS countries in connection with the global crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as analyze the activities and approaches of the donor community aimed at combating the pandemic and its social consequences.