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Black Male Student-Athletes and Racial Inequities in NCAA Division I College Sports: 2016 Edition

March 15, 2016

The purpose of this report is to make transparent racial inequities in the Power 5 conferences. Specifically, the author offers an analysis of Black men's representation on football and basketball teams versus their representation in the undergraduate student body on each of the 65 institutional members. He also compares Black male student-athletes' six-year graduation rates to rates for student-athletes overall, Black undergraduate men overall, and undergraduate students overall at each university.

Disproportionate Impact Of K-12 School Suspension And Expulsion On Black Students In Southern States

August 25, 2015

This report aims to make transparent the rates at which school discipline practices and policies impact Black students in every K-12 public school district in 13 Southern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Succeeding in the City: A Report from the New York City Black and Latino Male High School Achievement Study

September 30, 2013

Based on face-to-face interviews with over 400 black and Latino male students from 40 New York City public high schools, this report aims to understand how these young men succeeded in and out of school, developed college aspirations, became college-ready, and navigated their ways to postsecondary education. These high schools are part of New York City's Expanded Success Initiative, designed to increase college and career readiness among black and Latino males.

Black Male Student-Athletes and Racial Inequities in NCAA Division I College Sports

November 30, 2012

The purpose of this report is to make transparent racial inequities in NCAA Division I college sports. Specifically, the authors offer a four-year analysis of Black men's representation on football and basketball teams versus their representation in the undergraduate student body on each campus. The report concludes with recommendations for the NCAA and commissioners of the six major sports conferences, college and university leaders, coaches and athletics directors, journalists, and Black male student-athletes and their families.

Men of Color: A Role for Policymakers in Improving the Status of Black Male Students in U.S. Higher Education

November 1, 2012

This report calls for greater involvement by federal and state policymakers and others to improve black male college readiness and completion. It presents policy-relevant trends concerning black male college students, highlights promising practices on campuses across the country, and proposes suggestions for policymakers and other stakeholders.

Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study

February 6, 2012

The report presents insights from interviews with successful male African-American college students, highlighting factors that helped them succeed in a range of contexts: getting to college, choosing colleges, paying for college, transitioning to college, matters of engagement, and responding productively to racism.

They (Don't) Care About Education: A Counternarrative on Black Male Students' Responses to Inequitable Schooling

January 1, 2012

Focus group interviews and systematic content analysis of 304 essays written by black male undergraduates refute the dominant message that black men do not care about education. On the contrary, these students aspire to earn doctoral degrees in education despite acute understanding that the education system is stacked against them. The analysis asks what compels that dedication.

Student Organizations as Venues for Black Identity Expression and Development Among African American Male Student Leaders

March 1, 2007

The authors studied 32 high achieving black male students at six universities to explore ways in which involvement in student organization facilitated their development of positive black identities. They suggest that these results be considered in the conversation on improving college success among black males.