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Mismatched: Philanthropy’s Response to the Call for Racial Justice

October 16, 2021

Mismatched: Philanthropy's Response to the Call for Racial Justice is the most comprehensive assessment of racial equity and racial justice funding to date, providing a detailed analysis of funding from 2015–2018 and a preliminary analysis for 2020. Written by Malkia Devich Cyril, Lyle Matthew Kan, Ben Francisco Maulbeck, and Lori Villarosa, the report examines trends, contradictions, and divergences in funding for both racial equity and racial justice work.

The 2020 Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals Report

August 3, 2021

The Diversity Among Philanthropy Professionals (DAPP) Survey aims to help the philanthropic community better understand its workforce and leadership. This second DAPP report builds on the findings from 2018. The 2020 DAPP survey revealed a sector that was slightly more diverse than the 2018 DAPP identified. The percentages of people of color, people born outside of the United States, and people with disabilities in philanthropy all increased. 

Invisible Ink: Media Representation of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

May 1, 2021

Invisible Ink finds that news coverage of Asian Americans was so sparse, it was as if it was written in invisible ink. Given the power of the media to shape the perceptions and decisions of philanthropy, policy makers, and other key decision makers, it is critical for news media to accurately and robustly include AAPI people in the course of covering the full spectrum of issues, including economic inequality. Coverage reinforced underlying themes of the model minority myth and news coverage focused on Pacific Islanders was virtually non-existent. In particular, for articles related to economic inequality and that mention at least one racial group, the report notes:Less than a third of this set of news articles mention Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders.Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are the explicit focus of these articles less than 4 percent of the time.Only 2 percent of these news media articles feature disparities in Asian American or Pacific Islander communities.Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are included in the data cited in these articles only slightly more than a quarter of the time.In some cases, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were excluded from the data in these news articles because the original data sources did not include AAPI people. However, newsrooms omitted AAPI data 37 percent of the time, even when the data were available.

Seeking to Soar: Foundation Funding for Asian American & Pacific Islander Communities

March 1, 2021

This report, Seeking to Soar: Foundation Funding for Asian American & Pacific Islander Communities, probes the question of foundation investments in AAPI communities. In these pages, AAPIP provides a brief overview of philanthropic support for AAPI communities over the past 35 years, 10 years, and an even closer look at the last five years of currently available data. The major findings are a shocking disappointment — the percentage of foundation dollars designated for AAPI communities has not moved over the past three decades.This report is being released amidst an ongoing pandemic that unleashed anti-Asian hate and violence readily simmering just below the surface; a long overdue reckoning with systemic racism; a global economic crisis; and a tumultuous period of partisanship that is testing the strength of this country's multiracial democracy.

State of Philanthropy Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: Findings and Recommendations to Strengthen Visibility and Impact

September 1, 2020

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have been an important part of the United States for over 170 years, and are the fastest-growing racial groups in the country today. AAPIs have made significant gains in political representation, from the halls of Congress to state and local offices. We have also seen important gains in understanding the demographic makeup and public opinion of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.Yet, when it comes to philanthropy, AAPIs continue to be rendered invisible and marginal. This report—based on a summary of prior findings and insights from several data collections, including prior population surveys, content analysis of philanthropy news coverage, and surveys and interviews of leaders and staff in philanthropy—indicates that grantmaking to AAPIs remains a relatively low priority, and that AAPIs continue to face barriers when it comes to serving in leadership roles.

The 2018 Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals Report

November 21, 2019

In 2018, Funders for LGBTQ Issues set out to survey the board and staff of foundations in order to identify how many LGBTQ people worked in philanthropy — which resulted in The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy.In designing the survey, we realized that we had an opportunity to not only ask about sexual orientation and gender identity but also to inquire about a range of personal identifiers. With the inaugural Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals (DAPP) Survey, we asked participants to identify their role within their foundation, their age, gender identity, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and disability status. This report lays out the results of the DAPP survey in aggregate form.Produced in partnership with CHANGE Philanthropy and Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (EPIP), the report and accompanying infographic explore diversity in the philanthropic workforce. Overall, the report finds a statistically significant difference between funders with a social justice focus and all other funders. Social justice funders were much more likely to have higher representation of LGBTQ people, people of color, and people with disabilities.The report finds:People of color accounted for 37.8 percent of people on the staff or board of participating foundations.However, the percentage varied depending on a foundation's focus. People of color made up 45.6 percent of the staff and board at foundations with a social justice focus, while they accounted for 33.0 percent of staff and board at foundations with another focus.While women accounted for nearly 70 percent of the staff and board at all participating foundations, only 44 percent of board members were women.Nearly half of women at foundations with a social justice focus were women of color; only a third of women at foundations with another focus were women of color.Among lesbian, gay, and bisexual people in philanthropy, 43.1 percent of those at foundations with a social justice focus were people of color, compared to one-third of those at foundations with another focus.Among transgender people, 57.1 percent of transgender people at foundations with a social justice focus were people of color, while 25 percent of transgender people at foundations with another focus were people of color.At foundations with a social justice focus, people with disabilities made up 8.8 percent of staff and boards, compared to 4.8 percent at foundations with another focus.Across all participating foundations, 10.3 percent of staff and board were born outside of the United States.

The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy

October 15, 2018

The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy highlights the findings on sexual orientation and gender identity from the inaugural Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals (DAPP) Survey, a first-of-its-kind pilot study on diversity in philanthropy, conducted in partnership with SMU DataArts and made possible by funding from the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund. 

Foundation Funding for U.S. Trans Communities

July 26, 2018

Produced as a part of Funder's for LGBTQ Issues' Grantmakers United for Trans Communities (GUTC) Initiative, this infographic highlights the needs of the more than 1 million trans people in the United States and notes the current scale and scope of funding for trans issues.Transgender Americans face alarmingly high rates of poverty and homelessness, struggle with considerable health disparities, and constantly confront ill-informed stigma. While funding for transgender communities in the United States has increased four-fold in the last five years, as of 2016, it still totals less than $17 million a year. As a result for every $100 awarded by US foundations, only 3 cents benefits trans communities.

2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities

April 24, 2018

Funders for LGBTQ Issues and Global Philanthropy Project are pleased to share with you The 2015-2016 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, the most comprehensive report to date on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report captures data on 12,964 grants awarded by 511 foundations, intermediaries, and corporations and by 15 government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2015-2016. It builds upon the first edition of the Global Resources Report, which was released two years ago and focused on grantmaking in the calendar years 2013-2014. With this second volume, we now have comprehensive data on four calendar years of grantmaking, allowing us to conduct a deeper analysis of the trendlines for LGBTI funding over time. In several sections of this report, we offer not only a snapshot of funding for 2015-2016, but also an analysis of how funding has shifted over a four-year period. 

2013-2014 Global Resources Report: Government and Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Communities

July 6, 2016

The 2013-2014 Global Resources Report: Philanthropic & Government Support for Lesbian,Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities, is the most comprehensive report to date on the state of foundation and government funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This first-of-its-kind report captures data on 9,632 grants awarded by 415 foundations, intermediaries, and corporations and by 16 government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2013-2014. It provides detailed data on the distribution of LGBTI fundingby geography, issue, strategy, and population focus, offering a baseline for identifying trends, gaps, and opportunities in the rapidly changing landscape of LGBTI funding.

2014 Tracking Report: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Grantmaking by U.S. Foundations

February 23, 2016

The 2014 Tracking Report (2016) explores the scope and character of foundation funding for LGBTQ issues in the calendar year 2014. The report analyzes 4,552 grants from 313 foundations, making it the most comprehensiveness assessment of LGBTQ funding available.In 2013, funding for LGBTQ issues reached a record high of $153.2 million. In particular, there were significant increases in HIV/AIDS funding, support for the U.S. South, and grantmaking benefiting trans communities.However, there are an unfortunate number of sobering statistics behind the promising headlines. Despite our most sophisticated survey of philanthropic entities to date, the report finds that not since 2009 have so few funders supported LGBTQ issues.For the first time, the 2014 Tracking Report features an in-depth analysis of funding by 100 of the largest foundations in the United States. The report finds that more than 6 in 10 made no LGBTQ-specific grants in 2014.

2013 Tracking Report: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Grantmaking by U.S. Foundations

December 18, 2014

The 2013 Tracking Report (2014) explores the scope and character of foundation funding for LGBTQ issues in the calendar year 2013. The report analyzes 4,146 grants from 331 foundations, making it the most comprehensiveness assessment of LGBTQ funding available. In 2013, funding for LGBTQ issues reached a record high of $129.1 million.