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Excessive Revocations in Wisconsin: The Health Impacts of Locking People Up without a New Conviction

December 1, 2016

Revocation—being incarcerated for breaking the rules of a supervision arrangement (like parole, probation, or extended supervision)—feeds the mass incarceration cycle in the United States. Estimates suggest that across the U.S., half of the people in jails and more than one-third of the people entering prison are locked up for a revocation.A large number of people are incarcerated for breaking the rules of supervision, but do not commit a new crime. In Wisconsin, the Department of Corrections (DOC) put about 3,000 people in prison in 2015 alone for what DOC calls a "revocation without a new offense," meaning there was not a new criminal conviction. These people will serve an average of 1.5 years in prison without being convicted of a new crime—and cost Wisconsin $147.5 million dollars in the process.

Drowning in Debt: A Health Impact Assessment of How Payday Loan Reforms Improve the Health of Minnesota’s Most Vulnerable (Full Report)

March 1, 2016

This Health Impact Assessment (HIA) looks at the compelling evidence of the harm caused by payday loans to the health and mental health of borrowers, their families, and their communities. It shows that reforms to payday lending – including elimination of the practice in the state – will help slow the drain on individual and community resources, reducing stress and preventing further harm to health and well-being.

Drowning in Debt: A Health Impact Assessment of How Payday Loan Reforms Improve the Health of Minnesota’s Most Vulnerable (Executive Summary)

March 1, 2016

This Health Impact Assessment (HIA) looks at the compelling evidence of the harm caused by payday loans to the health and mental health of borrowers, their families, and their communities. It shows that reforms to payday lending – including elimination ofthe practice in the state – will help slow the drain on individual and community resources, reducing stress and preventing further harm to health and well-being.

Family Unity, Family Health: How Family-Focused Immigration Reform Will Mean Better Health for Children and Families

June 3, 2013

This report builds on a body of evidence on the impact of immigration policy on communities, paying particular attention to the health and mental health of children and families.Using existing research, predictive quantitative analysis and data from a convenience survey and two focus groups, this reportshines a light on the consequences of a continued policy of detention and deportation on: physical health, mental health, educational and behavioral outcomes among children; adult health status and lifespan; and economic hardship and food access in households.

Bridging Bays, Bridging Borders: Global Justice and Community Organizing in the San Francisco Bay Area

January 31, 2005

We offer this document as our own effort to build the inclusion and understandings that will help both communities and leaders recognize the grassroots wisdom and issues that could help us realize the positive impacts from globalization and minimize the negative aspects that have concerned us all. Another world is possible, but it is up to us to build it.