Clear all

12 results found

reorder grid_view

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Striving for Equity in Specialty Care Full Report

June 30, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Top TakeawaysThere are vast inequalities in access to and outcomes from specialty health care in the U.S. These inequalities are worst for minority patients, low-income patients, patients with limited English language proficiency, and patients in rural areas.A number of solutions have emerged to improve health outcomes for minority and medically underserved patients. These solutions fall into three main categories: increasing specialty care availability, ensuring high-quality care, and helping patients engage in care.As these inequities are also significant drivers of health costs, payers, health care provider organizations, and policy makers have a strong incentive to invest in solutions that will both improve outcomes and reduce unnecessary costs. These actors play a critical role in ensuring that equity is embedded into core care delivery at scale. 

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Increasing Specialty Care Availability

June 30, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Top TakeawaysThere are vast inequalities in access to and outcomes from specialty health care in the U.S. These inequalities are worst for minority patients, low-income patients, patients with limited English language proficiency, and patients in rural areas.A number of solutions have emerged to improve health outcomes for minority and medically underserved patients. These solutions fall into three main categories: increasing specialty care availability, ensuring high-quality care, and helping patients engage in care.As these inequities are also significant drivers of health costs, payers, health care provider organizations, and policy makers have a strong incentive to invest in solutions that will both improve outcomes and reduce unnecessary costs. These actors play a critical role in ensuring that equity is embedded into core care delivery at scale.Part 2: "Increasing Specialty Care Availability"Solutions such as telemedicine, innovative partnerships between specialists and primary care physicians, and centralized local referral networks improve access to specialty care.

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Ensuring High-Quality Specialty Care

June 30, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Top TakeawaysThere are vast inequalities in access to and outcomes from specialty health care in the U.S. These inequalities are worst for minority patients, low-income patients, patients with limited English language proficiency, and patients in rural areas.A number of solutions have emerged to improve health outcomes for minority and medically underserved patients. These solutions fall into three main categories: increasing specialty care availability, ensuring high-quality care, and helping patients engage in care.As these inequities are also significant drivers of health costs, payers, health care provider organizations, and policy makers have a strong incentive to invest in solutions that will both improve outcomes and reduce unnecessary costs. These actors play a critical role in ensuring that equity is embedded into core care delivery at scale.Part 3: "Ensuring High-Quality Specialty Care"New efforts to mitigate provider implicit bias, establish culturally-competent care, and leverage quality improvement approaches help identify and eliminate disparities in care.

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Striving for Equity in Specialty Care

June 29, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Part 1: "Striving for Equity in Specialty Care"A complex set of barriers to specialty care create Health inequities for many Americans, but the current healthcare landscape provides an opportune moment to address this challenge.

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Helping Patients Engage in Specialty Care

June 6, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Top TakeawaysThere are vast inequalities in access to and outcomes from specialty health care in the U.S. These inequalities are worst for minority patients, low-income patients, patients with limited English language proficiency, and patients in rural areas.A number of solutions have emerged to improve health outcomes for minority and medically underserved patients. These solutions fall into three main categories: increasing specialty care availability, ensuring high-quality care, and helping patients engage in care.As these inequities are also significant drivers of health costs, payers, health care provider organizations, and policy makers have a strong incentive to invest in solutions that will both improve outcomes and reduce unnecessary costs. These actors play a critical role in ensuring that equity is embedded into core care delivery at scale.Part 4: "Helping Patients Engage in Specialty Care"Specialty care actors are increasingly addressing the social determinants of health with community outreach, patient navigation, and patient support services.

Breaking the Barriers to Specialty Care: Practical Ideas to Improve Health Equity and Reduce Cost - Call to Action for a System-wide Focus on Equity

June 3, 2016

Tremendous health outcome inequities remain in the U.S. across race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and geography—particularly for those with serious conditions such as lung or skin cancer, HIV/AIDS, or cardiovascular disease.These inequities are driven by a complex set of factors—including distance to a specialist, insurance coverage, provider bias, and a patient's housing and healthy food access. These inequities not only harm patients, resulting in avoidable illness and death, they also drive unnecessary health systems costs.This 5-part series highlights the urgent need to address these issues, providing resources such as case studies, data, and recommendations to help the health care sector make meaningful strides toward achieving equity in specialty care.Top TakeawaysThere are vast inequalities in access to and outcomes from specialty health care in the U.S. These inequalities are worst for minority patients, low-income patients, patients with limited English language proficiency, and patients in rural areas.A number of solutions have emerged to improve health outcomes for minority and medically underserved patients. These solutions fall into three main categories: increasing specialty care availability, ensuring high-quality care, and helping patients engage in care.As these inequities are also significant drivers of health costs, payers, health care provider organizations, and policy makers have a strong incentive to invest in solutions that will both improve outcomes and reduce unnecessary costs. These actors play a critical role in ensuring that equity is embedded into core care delivery at scale.Part 5: "Call to Action for a System-wide Focus on Equity"These solutions create value not only for patients, but also for health care providers and public and private payers.  Each of these actors have a role to play in scaling and sustaining the health equity solutions. 

An Opportunity to Address Menstrual Health and Gender Equity

May 1, 2016

Menstruation is a monthly challenge for billions of women and girls worldwide. On any given day, more than 800 million girls and women between the ages of 15 and 49 are menstruating. Challenges with menstruation go beyond practical management to issues that affect the girl and her role in the community. While more governments, funders, and other actors are now addressing issues related to menstrual health, many existing efforts are disparate and siloed, and the field lacks the research needed to mobilize more organizations to get involved.This report examines the existing research linking menstrual health to broader outcomes around health, social norms, and education; describes the current state of the menstrual health field; and explores opportunities to better support women and girls.  Top TakeawaysThere has been increased momentum from donors, governments, and other private players to address problems related to menstrual health, but the focus to date has largely been on "hardware" (e.g., products and/or facilities). Few governments, corporations, and NGOs are looking at menstrual health as a systemic problem and thus are missing the opportunity to address the problems sustainably and at scale. There have been limited rigorous evaluations of menstrual health programming to understand what works and is replicable at scale.Evidence about the impact of poor menstrual health on other health, development, and empowerment outcomes is scant, not statistically significant, and largely inconclusive suggesting a need to invest in targeted research to mobilize targeted players in the field.Girls' experience with menstruation is inextricably linked to a broader set of changes affecting girls during puberty. The field needs to explore where menstruation can serve as an opportunity to access girls at a critical transition point in her life. With finite resources available to address issues facing adolescents, understanding the links between menstrual health and a broader set of norms can help to identify if there is an opportunity to influence a cross-cutting set of outcomes and set girls on a longer-term path to success.

Ahead of the Curve: Insights for the International NGO of the Future

December 1, 2013

International NGOs have a unique and important role to play in addressing today's complex global challenges. But few of them are living up to their full potential. With support from the Hewlett Foundation, FSG researched how the most innovative INGOs are adapting to the disruptions in the global development sector and embracing four approaches to create greater impact.

Competing by Saving Lives: How Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Companies Create Shared Value in Global Health

March 1, 2012

This report looks at how pharmaceutical and medical device companies can create shared value in global health by addressing unmet health needs in low- and middle-income countries. Companies have already begun to reap business value and are securing competitive advantages in the markets of tomorrow.

Lobbying for Good

December 15, 2008

In their efforts to be socially responsible, most companies fail to wield their most powerful tool: lobbying. Yet corporations such as Mary Kay, Royal Dutch Shell, and General Motors are increasingly leveraging their deep pockets, government contacts, and persuasive powers for the cause of good. Not all kinds of socially responsible lobbying are created equal, however. This article explores which forms of lobbying are best for companies and for society.

Smarter Programming of the Female Condom: Increasing Its Impact on HIV Prevention in the Developing World

October 1, 2008

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative value of the female condom for HIV prevention within heterosexual relationships in the developing world. In the last ten years, the world has witnessed both historic financial commitments to HIV/AIDS and new prevention options, including biomedical prevention research, male circumcision, and a dramatic scale-up of voluntary counseling and testing. At the same time, where HIV remains at epidemic levels in many countries, there has been a growing commitment to treatment access alongside prevention programs. However, portions of populations, particularly youth and women, remain highly vulnerable to HIV infection. Accordingly, the global health community can benefit from a better understanding of how existing prevention options should be effectively and efficiently delivered to reduce HIV in the developing world. This report provides guidance for the global health community for considering how the female condom fits within the set of prevention interventions currently available.

A New Challenge for Global Companies: Successfully Managing MLO and NGO Relationships

January 1, 2007

A telltale sign of the growing importance of multilateral organizations (MLOs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to companies today is the increased human resources dedicated to managing relationships with them. Multinational companies today are investing the time and talent to ensure that their relationships with MLOs and NGOs are active and positive. Although the field is awash in articles about the importance of MLOs and NGOs to companies, remarkably little is documented about how companies can best engage these multilateral and nonprofit actors