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Fostering Success for People Facing Barriers to Employment through SNAP Employment and Training:Promising Employment Program Models, Practices, and Principles for SNAP E&T Participants Facing Barriers to Employment

August 25, 2015

This brief provides information and resources about best and promising employment program models, practices, and principles for serving people facing significant barriers to employment in order to inform SNAP Employment & Training (E&T) state planning, partnerships, and implementation.

Webinar slides: Helping Opportunity Youth Succeed in Employment: Principles, Practices, and Innovations

June 11, 2015

These webinar slides present National Initiatives' report on employment program principles, practices, and innovations for opportunity youth. The slides give an overview of the paper and include presentation slides from two opportunity youth employment programs in the field, Roca, Inc., and Bright Endeavors.

Opportunity Youth Employment Program Case Study: Daybreak

May 29, 2015

This resource is a case study on Daybreak, a program that offers emergency shelter, street outreach, housing, education, mental health, and employment services -- including transitional jobs (TJ) within a social enterprise setting -- to help youth get and stay housed. Daybreak's target population had originally been young teens ages 10 to 18, but because of increasing needs the program now gives more attention to transition-aged youth ages 18 to 24.

Opportunity Youth Employment Program Case Study: Roca

May 29, 2015

The resource is a case study on Roca, a program that provides employment services, including transitional jobs, to opportunity youth. Roca's target population is high-risk, justice-involved young men ages 17 to 24, who are not in school, are unwilling or unable to engage in traditional social service programming, and are on track to adult incarceration.

Opportunity Youth Employment Program Case Study: Larkin Street

May 29, 2015

This resource is a case study on Larkin Street, a program that includes housing and medical care along with education, employment, and career services via their Larkin Street Academy. Larkin Street Academy "meets youth where they are" by offering a range of employment services including YouthForce, a job readiness class, the Institute for Hire Learning (IHL), and Wire Up.

Employer Engagement: Your Business Benefits When You Offer Job Opportunities to Subsidized Workers

November 19, 2014

Many transitional jobs (TJ) or subsidized employment programs rely on a strong network of employer partners who offer time-limited employment opportunities to subsidized workers. To cultivate relationships with new employers and build a robust network of partners, TJ or subsidized employment program staff may need to show employers how their business will benefit by bringing on time-limited subsidized workers.This resource is an example of the kind of one-page handout that program providers can develop to give to potential employer partners to help make the business case for offering time-limited job positions to subsidized workers. This resource is intended for use as a template that program providers can reference in creating their own, program-specific document.

Taking Care of Business: Transitional Jobs and Subsidized Employment Programs Benefit the Business Community

November 19, 2014

This brief draws from employer survey data, program evaluation evidence, and other relevant research to show how businesses benefit through partnerships with transitional jobs (TJ) and subsidized employment programs. The first section describes how businesses benefit by offering time-limited job positions to subsidized workers. The second section describes how businesses benefit by hiring employment program graduates into unsubsidized positions.We encourage employment program providers, administrators, planners, and other workforce development stakeholders to use this brief to formulate effective "business cases" for why employers should offer employment opportunities to subsidized workers or hire program graduates into unsubsidized jobs.

Employer Engagement: Your Business Benefits When You Hire Our Graduates

November 19, 2014

A central goal of transitional jobs (TJ) and many subsidized employment programs is to assist participants in securing permanent, unsubsidized jobs following program completion. To cultivate relationships with employers and build a robust network of hiring partners, TJ or subsidized employment program staff may need to show employers how their business will benefit by hiring TJ and subsidized employment program graduates.This resource is an example of the kind of a one-page handout that program providers can develop to give to employers to help make the business case for offering permanent, unsubsidized jobs to TJ and subsidized employment program graduates. This resource is intended for use as a template that program providers can reference in creating their own, program-specific document.

Employment Strategies for Young Families Experiencing Homelessness: FACT Summit Presentation

October 23, 2014

Presented at Heartland Alliance's Partnering for Impact: The Family Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) Summit on Family Homelessness, these slides offer best and promising practices, principles, and employment program models for helping young families and youth experiencing or at-risk of homelessness find and keep jobs. The slides also highlight the employment strengths and needs of families experiencing or at-risk of homelessenss.

Healthy Relationships, Employment, and Reentry

September 26, 2013

This brief will provide an overview of the evidence supporting the interrelatedness of employment, healthy relationships, family well-being, and recidivism. It will also give the perspectives of expert program practitioners who are successfully integrating programming related to employment, prison reentry, healthy relationships, and responsible fatherhood. Finally, this brief will offer program and policy recommendations for leveraging the positive impacts of healthy relationships on employment and reentry and vice versa.

Work Matters: Employment as a Tool for Preventing Homelessness and Improving Health

July 25, 2013

Poor health, unemployment, and homelessness are interconnected conditions that can exacerbate and reinforce each other. A physical or mental health condition that results in loss of employment can, in turn, lead to homelessness if an individual exhausts savings. Lack of housing increases an individual's exposure to disease and can worsen preexisting medical conditions. Poor health only makes it more difficult to secure and maintain employment to pay for housing. In short, employment is a significant social determinant of health. Employment-related services may be provided as part of a health center's case management activities. This guide supports integration of employment-related interventions with the already robust primary care and housing services being provided by health care for the homeless projects and related service providers.