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Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy - Indonesian Version

March 3, 2020

Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy is the second global picture of organizations serving philanthropy presented by WINGS that reflects on how we, as a field, can grow and strengthen philanthropy infrastructure worldwide.

Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy - Mandarin Chinese Version

November 25, 2019

Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy is the second global picture of organizations serving philanthropy presented by WINGS that reflects on how we, as a field, can grow and strengthen philanthropy infrastructure worldwide.

Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy

February 22, 2017

Infrastructure in Focus: A New Global Picture of Organizations Serving Philanthropy is the second global picture of organizations serving philanthropy presented by WINGS that reflects on how we, as a field, can grow and strengthen philanthropy infrastructure worldwide.

The Shrinking Space for Civil Society : Philanthropic Perspectives From Across the Globe

April 15, 2016

The shrinking space for civil society and reported violations to fundamental and democratic rights are a global phenomenon. Foundations and other philanthropic organisations have reported problematic laws in Algeria, China, Columbia, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Russia, Syria and Zimbabwe, just to name a few. And EU countries are hardly immune. Of serious concern have been ongoing challenges to civic rights in Hungary, UK surveillance programmes, anti-protest laws in Spain, counterterrorism measures in France, and attacks in Poland on the freedom of public media and the independence of the judiciary. In this publication, a group of European Foundation Centre members working across the globe share their thoughts on and experience of the shrinking space for civil society. This publication signals the EFC's ambition to scan the landscape on developments important to its members in an effort to contribute intelligence and capture the experience of foundations to make sense of the increasingly complex and interconnected world in which we all live. The insights from foundations and other philanthropic organisations on this issue are particularly valuable as these organisations, due to their funding practice and policy work, are often ahead of the curve in terms of what's happening on the ground.

Civil Society Space in Africa

January 1, 2012

If there is an event or a series of events that demonstrate the need to protect democracy and reclaim the space for civil society; it is none other than the uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East. These have reaffirmed the crucial point in democratic and transitional studies; that is; that economic development without political and social progress is not sustainable. By all standards and indices, North Africa was always rated highly in terms of economic performance, yet simmering underneath was a revolution as a result of the closure of the public sphere. So when in 2011, popular uprisings spread like bushfire in that region, many in academia, media, civil society and governments were caught unprepared. Change came from unexpected circles, challenging assumed doctrines and theories associated with the functionality of organised formations.

Transformative Innovations in African Philanthropy

November 1, 2011

This is a discussion of philanthropy in Africa in its many manifestations and how it seeks to address the promotion of wellbeing. Philanthropy and development are not new phenomena in Africa. Neither are they divorced from the questions of human wellbeing. For its part, philanthropy is intrinsically embedded in the life cycle of birth, life and death of many, if not all Africans. At any one given time, one is either a philanthropist or a recipient of one kind or another of benevolence. Though not a common or even user-friendly concept in Africa, philanthropy is a phenomenon perhaps best captured by the notions of 'solidarity and reciprocity' among Africans and some of the features that accompany relational building. As a result, therefore, culture and relation-building are central attributes in defining what philanthropy in the African context looks like.

Transformative Innovations in African Philanthropy, Briefing Summary

November 1, 2011

This is a summary of a discussion paper on philanthropy in Africa in its many manifestations and how it seeks to address the promotion of wellbeing.

The Legislative Environment for Civil Society In Africa A Synthesis Report

January 1, 2009

This paper is therefore a discussion of the legislative environment under which civil society, in particular organized formations, operate in Africa. It is based on twelve African countries (Angola, DRC, Ethiopia, Liberia, Mauritius, Mozambique, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe). In all these countries we studied civil/state relations, existing NGO laws and NGO policies, including other laws that have an impact on NGOs, national constitutions, processes and the general political economy of the third sector. The merging findings point to some interesting conclusions. More studies are underway in Botswana, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, and Swaziland. The findings from these will be integrated into the current paper. This paper is therefore work in progress -- nevertheless the countries studied already are significant to begin a discourse on state/civil society relations, public spaces, and the general legislative environment for citizens and their formations. One of the emerging findings is that the political context determined the emergence of these legal instruments.

Establishing a Civil Society Support Mechanism with the Pan African Parliament (PAP), the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM)

July 1, 2007

The Southern Africa Trust would like to thank the research team that was led by Bhekinkosi Moyo of TrustAfrica. He was assisted by Che Ajulu; Michele Ruiters and Nhamo Samasuwo of the Institute for Global Dialogue. The lead researcher wishes to thank Michele and Che for reading and commenting on the preliminary report. From Southern Africa Trust, appreciation goes to Neville Gabriel, Barbara Kalima- Phiri and Thembinkosi Mhlongo, who gave valuable support and input into the study. The study would not have been possible without the participation of various respondents throughout southern Africa and the rest of the continent. The Southern Africa Trust also extends its gratitude and appreciation to delegates who participated in the first-ever dialogue meeting between CSOs and the Pan African Parliament in May (7-8) 2007 at the margins of the 7th Session of the Pan African Parliament. Their contributions have been integrated into the report.